Caregiver Confessions with Leeza Gibbons

TV and radio personality Leeza Gibbons knows firsthand the dark, lonely, and stressful emotions that can be triggered by caring for a frail or sick loved one. While caring for her late mother, who had Alzheimer's disease, she conceived the Leeza's Place support centers for caregivers -- sanity-saving sources of respite, education, and, especially, company. "Nobody's a natural-born Mother Teresa or Florence Nightingale all the time," she says. "I know I wasn't." In this Caring.com special, Leeza reveals 12 common "caregiver confessions," along with her uplifting practical advice. "You are not alone," she says.

Caregiver Confessions: Introduction

Video 1 of 13

See also:


When You're Feeling Guilt

When You Don't Feel Appreciated

When You're Sleeping Poorly

When You're in Over Your Head


When You Lose Your Temper

Family Is Being Torn Apart

When You're Just Not Eating Right

When You Rarely See Friends


When You Resent Being a Caregiver

When No One Will Help


Feeling Anticipatory Grief

After Caregiving Ends


over 1 year ago, said...

One big ad for a for profit company. I am sorry cannot relate to someone with all the resources you could ever want or need. I am sorry for her loss but please don't compare to those who struggle to do this with no money or resources.


almost 2 years ago, said...

Thank you i need to hear this i tak care of my son and my85 yer old mom its nice to no im not alone


over 4 years ago, said...

Just a sincere "Thank You" for all that you are doing


almost 5 years ago, said...

Bathroom skills are going down hill. Husband was always very neat and careful. now " not so much"!!!. I guess I've been spoiled over the years.So many changes in my loved one.


almost 5 years ago, said...

Hello ''I'mhereforyo­u', Thank you for sharing your thoughts! Caring.com has an online support group with Alzheimer's caregivers that you may want to look into. It's free and it's a great place to ask questions and share about your own caregiving experiences. You can learn more about the "Steps and Stages" program here: http://www.caring.com/steps-stages/alzheimers Hope this resource is helpful to you!


almost 5 years ago, said...

It's really nice to read what you have written. I have felt so lost and alone with the caring of my mom since this disease has struck her she has been with me and my family for two and a half years. Our whole family dynamic has changed having to share everything with her and I have felt resentful and angry. She will often ask me me if she is a burden or I'm I angry with her. I explain she is not a burden and as far as anger I'm not angry at her only at her disease. I tell her that when I lose it. The guilt isnthenhard part and the anger I have towards my brother who doesn't offer anything not even a couple hours a month. My husband and children do more for her than her own son. Yes I know I must let this go but it is really hard to do. Sometimes I feel there is not outlet.


almost 5 years ago, said...

The understanding this represents is something my family and friends can't provide. Thank you - it really helps


almost 5 years ago, said...

Joanne P.B. you are incorrect but very good at re-stating the pharmaceutical rhetoric I heard when I was reversing my mother's emphysema. Nearly 2000 people have followed what I did for my mother and have gotten well so again I tell you your are 100% incorrect. With emphysema it is quite obvious there is a pathogen proliferating in the lungs of patients. As the proliferation continues the body adapts by distending the lungs. The pathogen then grows into those areas and the body adapts further. Eventually the distending lungs (termed "barrel chest" by the pharmaceutical and medical industries) crowd the stomach and the patient's meal size shrinks. Eventually the patient cannot eat enough food to cover the energy required for normal body functioning and labored breathing. We have all seen these patients sitting in a wheel chair, on supplemental oxygen looking like "skin and bones." If you realize that all pathogens eat sugar (you would need the graduate course in Pathology that I took and that you did not take) you would realize that taking away the food supply of this pathogen stops the disease progression. Look up Dr. Kenneth Hunter and his cancer research at the University of Nevada School of Medicine. He states that cancer cells have 90+ receptor sites for sugar. He uses the same diet or something very similar. Also look up Dr. Fred Pescatore, M.D., a prominent New York City physician who wrote, "The Allergy and Asthma Cure." You may also think that asthma is not curable but you did not go to medical school like Dr. Pescatore did. He uses the same diet in his 8-step cure for allergies and asthma, by the way. Your rhetoric and arrogance sounds like that of someone in the medical industry. Please remember there are more than 57,000 drugs on the market and not ONE that cures a disease! Emphysema and COPD can be stopped and can be cured by first stopping their progression. It has already been done. Read the book, "How I Reversed My Mom's Emphysema" and Dr. Pescatore's book and Dr. Hunter's research and Dr. Hirohito Kita's research (he is at Mayo Clinic) then you will know these so-called progressive diseases are not terminal no matter what terms you put on them. I asked my mother's doctors why emphysema got worse so long after my mother quit smoking. They said they did not know, it was a mystery! That sounds more like Harry Potter than medical science. The reality is that the research is out there but it is very well hidden by pharmaceutical companies and others that are profiting from the billions of dollars worth of medications that only mask symptoms and have never cured anything and never will. Those developing the drugs do not understand the disease, how could they possibly develop a drug that cures anything. Masking symptoms as a means of curing disease is like turning off a fire alarm in a burning building as a means of putting the fire out. it is pure nonsense!


almost 5 years ago, said...

I agree I think anyone who has been through this illness has something of value to share so I say thanks to Leeza and one else who has something to share that helps.


almost 5 years ago, said...

Wow it just blows my mind that theres so many people bashing on Leeza , yes she may have money , but when its all said , and done she has still lost just like we are all losing . Get mad at the disease not someone trying to share their experience with us .


almost 5 years ago, said...

Knowing that I`m not the only one feeling anger, and voicing it to my momma. I hate seeing her go down hill , and she gets mad , and wants to be honery. I know she can`t help doing this . Also I`m the only one to see her through this, which I feel blessed to be able to be so close to my momma. I want to get all I can out of these last days , months , years . But you do get wore down . My mother is also deaf , and that makes it even harder to communicate. She hasn`t been deaf all her life , so it`s hard to cope with some days. So thank you Leeza for sharing your heart with me . God bless you.


almost 5 years ago, said...

Wonderful!!


about 5 years ago, said...

having someone openly express the frustrations along with the comfort of knowing i am doing something.


about 5 years ago, said...

HI Leeza: I saw you advertisement last night on TV regarding stem cell research and I am very interested in this. My wife Jina was diagnosed with early on-set Alzheimer's almost 5 years ago when she was 47. She was the epitome of health having being a professional performer in Cats and other productions in Europe and New York. The disease has progressed rapidly and she is now in stage 7. I don't know if there is anything that can be done but I hope. We have seen the best doctors here and in Asia but nothing. I want to thank you for bring such awareness to this terrible disease. I think most people associate this disease with older people and thus the lack of funding for research compared to other disease. The truth is that this is becoming more and more prevalent with younger people such as my wife. With someone being diagnosed with this disease every 59 seconds I believe it is probably very scary for the looming baby boomer generation. I have some ideas how we could raise awareness and hopefully increase funding for research. Thank you again - Harry Scott


about 5 years ago, said...

I echo the opinions of some of the others. It's nice of Leeza to share parts of her experience, as it may bring some funding/interest from other areas into this difficult arena, however Leeza's experience as a celebrity is quite different from my own. Also different from those of us that have to work hard to scrape by, much less try to do full time caregiving on top of that.


about 5 years ago, said...

Greg, I am happy for you and your Mom but sadly there is no cure for COPD or Emphysema, they are progressive disease's that only get worse over time, my Mom was fine after treatments for asserbations (spelling?) on & off for 20 years with COPD but the last few years before her death were very hard on her and me. I pray for continued good health for your Mom and hope your alternative way of treating her gives her many more years with you "-)


about 5 years ago, said...

thank you Lisa, I've been down that road too, very difficult to say the least. I struggled with resentment towards other family members, guilt, losing my patience,not attending family events and just being plain out worn out sometimes, you got it all right. I would do it all over again and I still miss my poor Mom more than anything in this world..rest in Peace sweet Mother*


about 5 years ago, said...

For those who can't afford help. Check in your communities and online for organizations that have grant money for respite care for the caregiver. One good resource is the Alzheimer's Association. Caregiver releif fund is also a good resource.


about 5 years ago, said...

I seriously doubt that Leeza's experience mirrors that of everyday caregivers who cannot afford outside help, have no immediate or extended family to assist, and still try to juggle the needs of their loved one with a full time job and all the housework, laundry, appointment and medication management and everything else that goes with just getting through each day. I'm sorry that she had to go through what she did and G_d bless her standing by her Mother and for what she is doing for others, but it doesn't help. One of the things I hear the most is that I'm doing so much and "you need to make time for yourself" ..... well intentioned but impractical.