Ways to Pay for Home Care

How to Pay for In-Home Care
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The cost of in-home care usually ranges between $10 and $40 an hour, depending on the location (urban areas tend to be more expensive), the type of care needed (simple help around the house is less expensive than skilled help with bathing, toileting, and safely getting in and out of bed, for example), and whether the caregiver comes from a licensed home care agency (more expensive) or is an independent home care worker (less expensive).

Here are some of the options you can explore to help pay for in-home care:

  1. Pay for in-home care with public benefit programs.
    If your loved one has very low income and few assets other than the home he or she lives in, some public benefit programs -- including Medicaid, PACE, VA benefits for veterans, and Cash and Counseling -- pay a limited amount for care.

    See how public benefit programs can help you pay for in-home care.

  2. Pay for in-home care with private insurance.
    There are at least two options worth looking into: If your loved one has a long-term care insurance policy, it may include coverage for in-home care. He or she might also consider converting a life insurance policy into cash to help pay for in-home care.

    SEE ALSO: Find In-Home Care Help Near You

    Explore options for using private insurance to pay for in-home care.

  3. Pay for in-home care with personal and family assets.
    Like most families, you'll probably have to rely on your loved one's and other family members' personal assets to pay most in-home care costs. There are several ways personal and family assets can be used help pay for in-home care, including tapping into the equity in your loved one's home and gathering contributions from those family members who aren't actively helping with daily care.

    Explore ideas for paying for in-home care with personal assets.

  4. Pay for in-home care with creative ways to lower costs.
    To lower the cost of in-home care, you might explore some creative alternatives. Find volunteers at a local church or high school to provide a few hours of coverage each week, or schedule a few hours each week at an adult day program.

    Find out more about how to lower the cost of in-home care.

    SEE ALSO: Find In-Home Care Help Near You


3 months ago, said...

Do I need liability for my mother's personal care aide?


4 months ago, said...

Awesome...!!


4 months ago, said...

Do you have services for kid or only for adults i have 12 year old girl that receives services i am with another agency right know but i looking to change to another one


5 months ago, said...

The lady that had a Veteran father with ALZ and Parkinson's needs to contact Pallative Care and Hospice services. This will ease your burden. It does not mean he will die tomorrow. If he qualifies which it sounds like he does you will have tremendous resources covered by Medicare. CALL them ASAP


6 months ago, said...

My husband had a massive stroke and I have tried Depends and doubling them, but the bed kept getting wet and during the night my husband is soaked. I finally am using a diaper called 24/7. More absorbent, I can use just two a day rather than go through 6 Depends. You can order them on Amazon.


7 months ago, said...

I'm happy to say the Long Term Care Insurance has come a long way. Having two mom's who are 93 and 94 respectively, and having lead another family member through a search for their significant other's Altzheimers diagnosis and care, I have seen and lived many of the struggles. Currently working with one of the strongest providers of LTC, I am happy to share, ours does include Home Care, as well as many other alternatives to nursing home and Assisted Living care (including helping to train and reimburse a relative who comes in to assist. What is even better, is if living in a participating state, there can be advantages that help in tax and estate preservation.


7 months ago, said...

When hiring a caregiver always consider an agency that has drug screened,ran criminal background checks and is licensed, bonded and insured. Agencies may be a little more but you are letting a strange into your home! It's worth it to have peace of mind. Not to mention the tax liability involved too.


8 months ago, said...

We are thinking above hiring a live in caregiver. My vision is poor and need the occasional ride to appointments. My wife's health is fine, however she does need help around the house..how much do you pay and it there a specific qualified person that we should be looking for??


9 months ago, said...

how much would you pay for taking care of two parents with one Dementia and one who is has mobility issues. Both have many health issues. We have to have 24 hour care. During the nights its mostly for the one parent more then the other.


11 months ago, said...

I am surprised you omitted the registries from your care options. It is a great way to find highly vetted individuals for in home care


over 1 year ago, said...

I'm glad that there are so many ways that we can pay for health care, my mother needs more than we can afford. I have been trying to take care of her the best that I can, but I have three kids to take care of as well. Thank you for all the great information, this is going to be really helpful to me.


over 1 year ago, said...

In home care is the most viable option for the elderly when is comes to the economics. Most elderly are sent to outside services because of bathing and grooming being to difficult for the care giver. We have found that using a walk in bathtub like the one at hydrodimensions.com had helped us. There are ways to "senor proof" your home so you can be with your loved ones longer.


over 1 year ago, said...

what to do when these suggestions are no longer options.


almost 2 years ago, said...

Crossed another threshold. Now have the wife in two depends nightly, with pad to keep leakage off the sheets/mattress. Daily wash the PJ's and pad. Then take disposal wash clothes to wipe her down. Now find that she is not going to the bathroom during the day. Now, know that it will be just a matter of time before she ends up with a rash, or infection, due to the wet depends on her. So how does one, manage this??


over 2 years ago, said...

I moved in with my 75 year old mother who has COPD, Diabetes, among other health issues, my father 67 years old with rectal cancer and my younger sister with acute diabetes and acute leukemia. I completely take care of all of them and the house..everything they need even taking my sisters dog outside to go potty because she can barely walk due to pain. My mother seems to think she's doing me a favor and I even get food stamps to pay for my own food. How can I inform her that it is I doing her the favor. She hurts my feelings and I just want to walk away, but I don't want to do that because I love them. She has no money to pay anyone, she can barely pay her bills and sometimes she cant. She says things to make me feel like I am free loading off her but I have no time to go to work I am always busy here. What do I do? I can't even afford to buy new undergarments while any extra money she does get she blows on things she does not need (almost fifty dollars on candy at the 99 cent store!).


over 3 years ago, said...

unknown


almost 4 years ago, said...

I am fiduciary and care giver for my dad, have to be through the VA his fiduciary. I am currently on disability and that is the reason I was able to care for my mom till she died and now my dad. Due to the time I put in as a caregiver and filling out endless forms and doctor records through the VA and the state I have little to no time for much else. I started filing his taxes 3 years ago, but after hours and hours at H&R Block have barely gotten his return for 2010 done, which I realized I had not put a bunch of deductions on that I ought to have. I have gotten extensions since. I have receipts but have no idea if he will owe taxes or not. The year I started doing them we had to use his money to make handicapped accessible this home. We had to meet standard requirements for home safety in order for the state to even allow him to live here. Our house, which had not been remodeled at all since my mom bought it 40 years ago and left it to us, was fraught with dangers, including mold, electrical problems, no walls in most of the upstairs, animals living under the floors and getting in through the old roof. For the safety of all of us, and for the accommodations for dad, we spent 100,000. of his money to make this home safe and state approved for him to live here. For that year I paid the IRS some 10,000. toward the bill which still has an outstanding balance on it. I realized after many visits to H&R Block that only the plumbing was deductible from the dissolving of his stocks, which have that estate tax on them. My concern is that when dad is gone, what do I do about the not filed IRS returns and what if money is still owed to them? Who is then responsible? He owns no home, his car and all his belongings were stolen by an ex girlfriend who moved him out of state the day she discovered he had Alzheimers. She changed the Will to all her, but we took his original Will and made it an irrevocable trust, at which point she had sent him here for me to watch him and then refused to ever see him again. She sold his car and his many valuables I have no idea what she did with. I have no access to any of that anymore. Now he lives on SSI and a VA Pension which barely covers his cost of living, and often I am putting some of my measly 700./month disability into his care costs. I tried to hire him an attorney but they charged me 400. to walk through the door, did nothing but retrieve his records from his former attorney and sent me a bill for over 700. more! I never paid that bill and do not think I should be responsible for it either. My greatest concern however is the IRS, can they come after me? All I own is my 14 year old car and half the house I live in, I have no assets, no money in the bank. I live day to day barely, and it costs so much just to feed him etc that there is not a dime left to pay anyone. Who is responsible for not filed IRS returns after someone dies if money is somehow owed? I doubt these past two years will amount to much owed as there was only his SS and VA Pension all of which goes to his care and is recorded with the VA. I am still trying to pay for his cremation which is 3,000. and have no idea how I will even do that. The VA pays for all burial except the cremation. If anyone has any ideas on this please let me know. As far as I can tell he will have debt when he dies and I will probably lose my home as I alone cannot afford to pay to live here. While I get 600./month from the VA to care for him that entire amount and then some goes to bills for this house. When he goes and I lose that 600./month I will no longer be able to even live here, so what happens then? I sell my half of the house, my brother owns the other half, and do what? There is already a lien on my house for a credit card debt from decades ago. It is only 1600. So there it is, house is liened, I own half, dad is so hard to care for but the kindest man I have ever known. He has ALZ, Parkinson's, spinal stenosis, arthritis, no longer walks or feeds himself, and is on a special pureed diet with supplements that cost me a fortune, but I HAVE to I WANT to take care of him. PLEASE help me figure out my next move. I had to quit teaching due to going on life support from COPD, where is all this going to leave me and my youngest son who still lives with me. Help if you can. ty and God bless everyone of you who cares for you parents, it is the right thing to do! D.


almost 4 years ago, said...

We can find all sorts of reasons for not offering free rent in return for live-in care, however, what can elderly and/or disabled people do if they cannot afford to pay for home care, and are not eligible for Medicaid, etc.? We decided to take a chance and haven't regretted it for an instant. We did check out our two young (23 & 23) military men with their superiors and learned they had excellent records, and were recommended for this type arrangement. We will look for military men in the future IF we have a need. Living near a military base has its advantages, but nursing schools, colleges and churches are other places to look for kind, loving people, who need help with their finances.


almost 4 years ago, said...

@Wellspouse-that is a very good point and an important advocacy issue. We rely so much on what family caregivers provide--they all need to be supported! @jrtfoxie It is great that you have found an option that works for you, but I would caution that people need to go in to that type of arrangement with eyes wide open. 1st: you need to find good people and no amount of background checking can absolutely assure that--but there are many great people out there and it sounds you have done a thorough job, but others are not so fortunate. Or, the situation changes over time and the live in caregivers start to have more and more influence (seen it so many times, I hate to say--often people the families thought were a godsend but things start changing and by that time they're so much "part of the family" it is hard to disentangle). 2nd: various liability issues esp. in the area of worker's comp/disability i.e. what happens if the person injures himself while working at the home--people need to get a solid answer from their attorney ahead of time and minimally probably need an umbrella liability policy (if you think homeowner's covers it, I'd ask a lawyer who specializes in this area before making that assumption). There are also tax and other issues (backup care, what happens when you need more physical care and you either move on to a care facility or need to bring in trained caregivers, how does the relationship end, etc.) that can arise. I know everyone has different situations and we all have to figure out what will work best for each of us, but in many years in geriatric care management (as well as a personal experience in my family) I have seen too many of the problems--and talked to so many individuals and families who didn't realize some of the issues that can (and do) arise. My warning would just be to completely understand the situation (and all the potential costs involved), whatever option you choose.