Author: Sarah Williams
Reviewed By: Brindusa Vanta

Assisted living facilities provide limited medical care, subject to state regulations, community policies, staffing and resident care plans. Although facilities may offer basic medical services, they can’t admit residents with complex health care needs. Additionally, a resident must move to a different setting if their requirements exceed a community’s scope of care.

Typical Medical Services in Assisted Living Facilities

Although assisted living communities primarily provide practical, hands-on help with activities of daily living and recreation programs, many also offer simple health care services. Generally, residents must pay for such services on top of the base care package fees. Some facilities have on-call or full-time nurses who perform periodic wellness checks and respond to emergencies. Depending on state regulations, communities often offer medication assistance, and some also provide drug administration services. If rules and licensing terms permit, communities might provide intermittent skilled nursing.

Facilities may contract with third-party providers for visiting health services, such as dental care, foot care and rehabilitation. Some communities offer on-site pharmaceutical and diagnostic services, such as blood tests and imaging. Caregivers typically coordinate off-site physician and hospital appointments, and facilities provide medical transportation. However, seniors with ongoing medical needs usually require a more clinically focused setting.

Other Options for Seniors With Medical Needs

Home health care agencies provide part-time nursing and therapeutic care in the comfort of a senior’s private residence. Services include wound care, pain management and nutrition therapy, as set out in a recipient’s personalized plan. Care teams consist of nurses, personal care aides and nursing assistants alongside physical, occupational and speech therapists.

Nursing homes suit seniors with more intensive medical needs. Staffed by registered nurses, licensed professional nurses and certified aides, such facilities provide around-the-clock care and supervision. Services include skilled nursing, rehabilitation therapies, dietary oversight and management of chronic conditions.          

Assisted living facilities provide limited medical care, subject to state regulations, community policies, staffing and resident care plans. Although facilities may offer basic medical services, they can’t admit residents with complex health care needs. Additionally, a resident must move to a different setting if their requirements exceed a community’s scope of care.

Typical Medical Services in Assisted Living Facilities

Although assisted living communities primarily provide practical, hands-on help with activities of daily living and recreation programs, many also offer simple health care services. Generally, residents must pay for such services on top of the base care package fees. Some facilities have on-call or full-time nurses who perform periodic wellness checks and respond to emergencies. Depending on state regulations, communities often offer medication assistance, and some also provide drug administration services. If rules and licensing terms permit, communities might provide intermittent skilled nursing.

Facilities may contract with third-party providers for visiting health services, such as dental care, foot care and rehabilitation. Some communities offer on-site pharmaceutical and diagnostic services, such as blood tests and imaging. Caregivers typically coordinate off-site physician and hospital appointments, and facilities provide medical transportation. However, seniors with ongoing medical needs usually require a more clinically focused setting.

Other Options for Seniors With Medical Needs

Home health care agencies provide part-time nursing and therapeutic care in the comfort of a senior’s private residence. Services include wound care, pain management and nutrition therapy, as set out in a recipient’s personalized plan. Care teams consist of nurses, personal care aides and nursing assistants alongside physical, occupational and speech therapists.

Nursing homes suit seniors with more intensive medical needs. Staffed by registered nurses, licensed professional nurses and certified aides, such facilities provide around-the-clock care and supervision. Services include skilled nursing, rehabilitation therapies, dietary oversight and management of chronic conditions.