Who is doing the most promising research for an Alzheimer's cure?

7 answers | Last updated: Dec 04, 2016
A fellow caregiver asked...

Who is doing the most promising research for an Alzheimer's cure?


Expert Answers

Paula Spencer Scott, contributing editor, is the author of Surviving Alzheimer's. A Met Life Foundation Journalists in Aging fellow, she writes extensively about health and caregiving; four of her family members have had dementia.

It's hard to say. Scores of research teams around the world are racing to find a cure for Alzheimer's disease; the central problem is that we're not yet sure exactly what causes the disorder in the first place. Until the disease process is understood, a cure per se can't be implemented. Given the probability that there are a variety of factors at play, both genetic and environmental (habits, general health, etc.) some scientists don't believe we will see a one-size-fits-all "cure." This is part of the reason there's a major push toward both prevention (because we do understand some of the factors that raise one's risk of Alzheimer's) and treatment (because millions of people are living with the disease and will continue to develop it before a cure is introduced). While a cure would obviously be an incredible and monumental development, it's unfortunately not likely to be a headline we'll be reading about in the foreseeable future.


Community Answers

Margieb answered...

Where do I read about the factors that raise one's risk? My paternal grandmother had it and lived into her 90's. Now my mom has it, 85 years old, and is progressively getting worse (naturally). I'm so afraid I've inherited some of the genes. At 59, I daily am forgetting things or doing silly things which scare me A LOT!!! Things like split second forgetting how to turn on my windshield wipers, or turn off a radio. As soon as I truly concentrate on the act, I do it... so is this Alzheimer's beginning or is it too much on my mind. I pray the latter but I'm afraid of the former.


Grannylove2 answered...

MargieB, I know exactly what you mean. I find myself doing really dumb things and forgetting stuff - most of it momentary. I have taken the quick little memory tests and pass with flying colors and have been told numerous times that it is only stress that is making me this way. I DO have a tremendous amount of stress in my life right now but how do they KNOW that's all it is? Where do we turn to get a definitive answer? Are there any tests that we could take that may would lead us to a better answer?


Dove answered...

When my mother died of Alzheimer's I went through a long period of fear that I might get it too. Every time I forgot something ,even for a moment I felt panic. I was so afraid it was a sign I was getting it. This went on for a good while and my doctor said I was so afraid of making a mistake or forgetting any thing at all that I was hurting my self.The things I worried about have not happened. I am now 75. So I think I have done well and I don,t worry as much now. So dear heart, slow down, take a deep breath and things do work out.God bless you. Dove


Gadjett answered...

MargieB - I'm 65 and take care of my mom who has Alzheimer's. I'm doing some of the same things you are doing - esp on the computer - and i've been working on one 'forever'! Like you say though, if I stop and just think about what I'm doing I can usually find a way to do what I was wanting to do (like save a change on a page the easy way)- or change windows. I'm trying Prevagen and feel like it's helping some already - I have my mom on it too and she seems to talk better.... I choose to think I just have too much going on in my life and that is what is causing my 'senior moments'!


A fellow caregiver answered...

Margie B, I know how you feel. My mother died of Alzheimer's, I'm 65 and the other day I momentarily forgot which was the hot water faucet and which was the cold. This sort of thing happens to me a lot. It's scary. However, if it makes you feel better--I have been a volunteer research subject on a big aging and memory study at a local university hospital for the past two years and as part of that study have taken many many cognitive tests and had many different types of brain scans. The researchers say my brain is normal for my age. I'm trying to believe them...


Rabbit howls answered...

I forget things too and it used to scare me alot. Now, I just remind myself that it's okay to forget where I put the keys as long as I don't forget what the keys are for. Hope this helps. Penn Medicine is doing alot of research for stopping Alzheimer's and Parkensons and making great strides in this brain-related research. Hopefully, in a few years.... Check out their website and you'll see.