How We Found the Best Hoyer Lifts
50+ Hours of Research
90+ Models Viewed
12+ Companies Considered
8 Companies Selected

What You Should Know About Hoyer Lifts

  • According to the CDC, overexertion injuries are twice as common among medical caregivers than employees in any other industry.
  • Hoyer lifts, or patient lifts, are a safe option for caregivers that transition those with limited mobility to or from a chair, bed, toilet, or a standing position.
  • Medicare, Medicaid, and other insurance options can help cover some or all the costs of a Hoyer lift.
  • Many Hoyer lift manufacturers also offer payment plans to help customers more easily afford their products.

Caregivers – whether professionals like nurses and home health aids or loved ones like spouses and children  –  are at risk for serious injuries. Lifting a patient without a device like a Hoyer lift can be dangerous, and musculoskeletal problems like neck and back injuries are the leading reason for missed days of work for those who work in healthcare environments. In fact, the rate of overexertion injuries in healthcare workers is twice as common as it is for workers across all industries. Preventing injuries is crucial, and having the right lifting equipment makes all the difference.

Many caregivers turn to patient lifts –  commonly referred to as Hoyer lifts –  to alleviate strain and reduce the likelihood of caregiver and patient injuries. These lifts look similar to the engine lifts traditionally seen in car repair shops. Other lift styles abound, with options that are installed in the ceiling and intended to move patients with limited to no strength, or more active designs that require some patient participation. Caregivers have many types and brands to choose from, but the thought of spending hundreds or even thousands of dollars on a lift can be intimidating. 

We’ve written this guide to help caregivers understand the patient lift market. Below you’ll find details on some of the best Hoyer lifts as well as other patient lift options. You’ll also find educational information on how lifts work and how to buy a lift and sling that fit a patient’s needs and budget.  

Hoyer Lift Basics

Hoyer Lift Basics

Hoyer is technically a brand name, but many people use the term “Hoyer lift” to refer to any patient lift, including those made by other companies. In the following section we’ve split patient lifts into three basic categories, with an explanation of each, so that you can understand their differences. We’ve also provided additional information on the slings used with these devices. 

Floor Lifts

The Hoyer lift – also frequently referred to as a floor lift, passive lift, or patient lift –  is a tall pole (mast) with a U-shaped base and an overhead horizontal bar (arm) with hooks (a cradle or spreader bar) on top. A patient sling, often sold separately, is suspended via loops or metal clips attached to the spreader bar via its hooks. The patient in the sling is raised, lowered, and moved side to side with the moveable horizontal arm that is operated via a hydraulic system. 

All Hoyer lifts look similar, but there are some key differences. Some of them are powered by a battery or a wall plug, while others have a large lever that needs to be repeatedly pumped by hand to operate the hydraulic system. Power lifts usually provide a smoother ride for the patient than a manual lift, but they are significantly more expensive. 

Overhead Lifts

Overhead lifts perform the same job as the more traditional Hoyer lifts described above and also require no work on behalf of the patient. However, overhead lifts have a different design and feature a motor on a track rather than movable arms and poles. The motor can be attached to a track installed on the ceiling or to a large freestanding track that arches above the patient with its legs on either side of the patient’s bed or chair. Both designs feature a sturdy cable that extends downward from the motor to clip to the patient’s sling. With both styles of overhead lift, the motor can move the patient from side to side as well as up or down.

Overhead lifts are usually installed over a bed to move the patient from the bed to a chair or commode. However, some patients may install extended ceiling tracks so they can move from one room to another, though this is uncommon and expensive. A more cost-effective option is to buy freestanding overhead lifts fitted with wheels that can be moved from room to room with relative ease.

Active Lifts

Also known as sit-to-stand lifts, these lifts are much different than both passive lifts and overhead lifts. They require the patient to have some strength and the ability to participate in the transfer process. Active lifts employ a sling that straps around the middle of the torso, rather than enveloping the whole trunk. The lift can be electric or manual, and it uses the sling and hydraulics to pull the patient’s body upwards into a “transfer position” while the patient faces the lift. 

Once in the transfer position, the patient’s feet are on a small platform and the knees are slightly bent, resting firmly against knee pads. The torso is supported by the wide sling around the waist and under the arms, and the patient leans comfortably back against the sling.

Anyone using an active lift needs the following:

  • At least some ability to grip bars with hands
  • A strong neck and back
  • The ability to sit independently at the edge of a bed
  • Knees that can bend well and legs that can tolerate some pressure

Slings

Slings are essential to the lift’s function and come in many shapes, sizes, and options. Most slings keep the patient in a seated position with the legs hanging outside of the sling, though there are exceptions.

Some common sling styles are designed specifically for the following:

  • Bariatric patients
  • Petite patients
  • Amputees
  • Disposable/single-use needs
  • Commode use
  • Patients who need extra back and neck support
  • Patients who use active lifts

Materials commonly used for slings include: 

  • Polyester
  • Mesh
  • Padded, quilted material
  • Sturdy single-use material

How We Chose the Best Hoyer Lift Companies

In order to select the best Hoyer lift, caregivers need to narrow their search to only the best Hoyer lift companies. Below, we explain the three main criteria we used to select the companies included in this guide.

Lift Variety

  • We looked for companies that offer a variety of lift models to fit different size homes and suit a range of patient and caregiver abilities. 
  • We only included companies that offer styles from at least two of the three major categories of lifts: floor lifts (also called Hoyer lifts or passive lifts), active lifts, and overhead lifts. 
  • Many of the companies on our list have both manual and powered models in each category.

Sling Options

  • Slings are often sold independently of lifts because sling designs are quite variable. We, therefore, opted to include companies on our list that have a large selection of sling styles. 
  • The companies we included have slings in a variety of sizes, shapes, and materials. There are even disposable slings, bariatric slings, pediatric slings, and slings with full back and neck support.

Industry Experience

A lift is a major investment for most patients, so it’s important to find one from a company with a proven track record. We’ve only featured companies that have at least a decade of experience. Shopping from companies with a long history gives you an opportunity to look at customer reviews that indicate how well the product functions over time.

The 8 Best Hoyer Lift Brands of 2022

Company

Lift Styles 

Available Models 

Available Slings

Accessories 

Price Range

Distributors

-Manual and power floor lifts
-Overhead ceiling lifts
-Manual and powered active lifts

10+ 

30+ styles

-Pads for slings

Lifts: $650-$12,300
Slings: $150-$576



Dealers and online retailers, including Walmart

-Manual and power floor lifts
-Power active lifts

6+

10 with many sizes

-Chains for bariatric slings
-Digital scale

Lifts: $566-$3,790
Slings: $41-$300

Amazon storefront, dealers, and online retailers 

-Manual and power floor lifts
-Powered active lifts

9+ 

8+ styles

-Digital scale
-Charging station upgrades

-Sling straps
-Replacement parts

Lifts: $3500-$3,000
Slings: $38-$220



Limited Amazon storefront, dealers, and online retailers including Walmart

-Manual and power floor lifts
-Manual and power active lifts

9+ 

14+ 

-2 different digital scales

-Sling chains and straps
-Replacement parts

Lifts: $860-$6,890
Slings: $67-$530

Through dealers and online retailers

-Power floor lifts
-Power active lifts
-Freestanding and ceiling overhead lifts

12+

20+ styles in 9 sizes

-Diagnostic software
-Digital scales
-Numerous spare parts
-Storage accessories
-Wireless controllers
-Protective wraps and straps

Lifts: $1,700- $10,885
Slings: $89 -$540

Through dealers

-Manual and power floor lifts
-Power active lifts

5+

16

-Digital scale

-Replacement parts

Lifts: $540- $8,072
Slings: often included



Through dealers and online retailers 

-Power floor lifts
-Freestanding and ceiling overhead lifts

20+

20+

-A variety of sling bars for lifts

Lifts: $1,920- $10,890
Slings: About $130-$755

Amazon storefront, dealers, and online retailers 

-Manual and power floor lists
-Manual and Power active lifts
-Ceiling lifts

18

12

-Spare parts
-Digital scales

Lifts: $626- $4,670
Slings: $70-$200

Amazon storefront, dealers, and online retailers

Hoyer by Joerns Healthcare

Most Industry Experience

The original Hoyer brand lift was designed by the quadriplegic Ted Hoyer and his associate Victor R Hildemann. This lift design, which may have been based on the earlier concept of an engine lift, was patented in 1958. The patient lift became so useful that the Hoyer name grew to be more recognizable than the generic term “adjustable base invalid lift” which Hoyer originally filed the patent application under. This innovative brand is still well known, and its lifts are now manufactured and distributed by the respected medical equipment brand Joerns Healthcare. 

Customers who are looking for a lift brand with a thoroughly proven track record will find Hoyer by Joerns an excellent option. Joerns brings over 125 years of industry experience to the already impressive history of the Hoyer lift. The company, which is headquartered in Charlotte, North Carolina, is trusted throughout North America and Europe to provide a diverse range of high-quality medical equipment to institutions and retailers. 

Overview of Hoyer by Joerns Healthcare

Below is an overview of the different lift models that are a part of the Joerns Healthcare’s Hoyer brand. Additional lifts are also available and can be found on the Joergens Healthcare website.

Hoyer Presence

HML 400

Hoyer Elara 500

Hoyer HPL 700

Hoyer Elevate

Lift Style

Power floor lift

Manual floor lift

Overhead ceiling lift

Power floor lift

Power active lift

Maximum Capacity

500lbs

400lbs

500lbs

700lbs

440lbs

Safety Features

-Display with lift activity
-Overload alert
-Service reminder
-Emergency stop
-Swan neck style allows lift close to patient

-Non-sway cradle for extra stability

-Soft start and stop
-Emergency stop and lower
-Gives light in dark settings
-4-wheel traverse track option to reduce caregiver effort

-Display with lift activity
-Overload alert
-Service reminder
-Emergency stop
-Compatible with different spreader bars for use with the best sling

-Display with lift activity
-Overload alert
-Service reminder
-Emergency stop
-Powered leg adjustment avoids caregiver strain

Price Range

$3,600-$8,200

$650-$900

$2,980 

$4,100-$7,500

$4,100-$12,300

Distributors

Dealers and online retailers such as Walmart, Vitality Medical, Direct Supply, and others

Dealers and online retailers such as Walmart, 4MD Medical, and others

Dealers and online retailers such as Direct Supply

Dealers and online retailers such as Walmart, Vitality Medical, Med Mart, and others

Dealers and online retailers such as Vitality Medical, Direct Supply, and others

Prices vary significantly depending on whether or not a built-in scale is included with your Joerns Healthcare Hoyer lift. Some dealers may only stock models with a scale, while others may only stock models without. Yet others may offer both options. For overhead ceiling lifts, the cost of installation may also be substantial.   

Pros and Cons of Hoyer by Joerns Healthcare Patient Lifts 

Pros:

  • Offers bariatric lifts as well as other lifts with unusually high weight limits.
  • Only brand with safety lighting, included as a feature of its Elara ceiling lift.
  • Many powered models include 2 batteries and an offboard charger so one can continually be charging while the other is in use.
  • Most models have an optional built-in scale and come equipped with multiple safety features for patient and caregiver protection.

Cons:

  • Battery-operated power lifts need to have batteries replaced daily or after each shift, depending on use.
  • Pricier models cost between $11,000 and $13,000, an amount many may find a significant barrier.

Lumex by Graham-Field

Most Affordable Active Lift

Lumex, which makes patient lifts and other mobility aids, is just one part of the Graham-Field company. Besides Lumex, Graham-Field owns eight other companies and sells a grand total of about 50,000 individual products. The Graham-Field company was founded in 1946, and in recent years it has modernized the way it runs its manufacturing and distribution centers. The brand has focused on making itself more environmentally friendly, installing LED lights, instituting recycling policies within its factories, reducing paper waste, and more. Lumex products are made in Georgia, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin.

Lumex lifts generally sell at the lower end of the price spectrum. For caregivers and patients who want to incorporate an active lift into the care routine, Lumex can be an especially smart buy. This brand offers among the lowest cost options for active power lifts, retailing for as much as $3,000 less than similar power active lifts from competitors. 

Overview of Lumex Hoyer Lifts

Below is an overview of the different lift models that are a part of Graham-Field’s Lumex brand. Additional lifts are also available and can be found on the Graham-Field website.

LF2090

LF1050

LF1031FP

LF2020

LF1090

Lift Style

Active power lift

Power floor lift

Manual floor lift

Active power lift

Power floor lift

Maximum Capacity

600lbs

400lbs

400lbs

400lbs

600lbs

Safety Features

-Emergency stop button
Low battery warning
-Large handles for easy movement of lift

-Emergency stop button
-Manual lowering mechanism
-Low battery warning

-Heavy steel design
-Easy to use hydraulic pump handle
-Foot pedal to adjust base without caregiver strain

-Emergency stop button
-Low battery warning
-Large handles for easy movement of lift

-Emergency stop button
-Manual lowering mechanism
-Low battery warning

Price Range

$2,100-$3,500

$1,300-$3,000

$566-$1,180

$1,500-$3,790

$1,880-$3,340

Distributors

Amazon storefront and online retailers such as Vitality Medical, RehabMart, 4MD Medical, and more

Amazon storefront and online retailers such as Vitality Medical, RehabMart, and more

Amazon storefront and online retailers such as Walmart, 4MD Medical, and more

Amazon storefront and online retailers such as Vitality Medical, RehabMart, and more

Amazon storefront and online retailers such as Vitality Medical, 4MD Medical, and more

Pros and Cons of Lumex Patient Lifts 

Pros:

  • 2 point slings can cost as little as about $40 from some retailers, although other more advanced designs are $200 or more.
  • Lift purchases often come with extra items such as storage bags for accessories and informational videos on how to use lifts.
  • Battery-powered lifts have limited 3 year warranties on frames and spreader bars, 2 year limited warranties on actuators, and a 1 year limited warranty on batteries.
  • Multiple bariatric lifts available that support up to 600 lbs, as well as three different models of manual hydraulic lifts.

Cons:

  • No ceiling or freestanding overhead styles available.

Drive Medical 

Most Affordable Overall

Drive Medical is one of the most well-known brands of durable medical equipment. Many individuals may already be familiar with Drive Medical thanks to its popular lines of wheelchairs, scooters, walkers, canes, and many other mobility aids. The brand has been in business for more than 20 years, and it has also recently acquired another company, DeVilbiss Healthcare, that has roots in the healthcare innovation of the mid-1800s. Drive Medical, which has headquarters in New York, has facilities around the world and a global customer base. 

Drive Medical is one of the most commonly available lift brands from online independent mobility retailers. Not satisfied with being widely available, Drive Medical also makes sure that its prices are affordable. This brand has some of the lowest cost patient lifts on the market, especially in its manual lift line. Caregivers who need a budget-friendly option and who are able to operate a lift by hand will appreciate how accessible Drive products are for their budgets compared to other brands.  

Overview of Drive Medical Hoyer Lifts

Below is an overview of the different lift models that are a part of Drive Medical. Additional lifts are also available and can be found on the Drive Medical website.

13240

13023

FLP600

FLNP600

STSP450

Lift Style

Power floor lift

Manual floor lift

Power floor lift

Power floor lift 

Power active lift

Maximum capacity

450lbs

450lbs

600lbs

600lbs

450lbs

Safety Features

-Heavy-gauge design
-Emergency button to switch to manual mode for emergency lowering
-Low battery warning

-Strong chrome-plated steel construction
-High-performance hydraulics allow gradual raising and lowering 

-Dual controls
-Low battery and weight overload alert
-Safety stop for obstructions
-Maintenance due alert 

-Dual controls
-Low battery and weight overload alert
-Safety stop for obstructions
-Maintenance due alert 

-Dual controls
-Overcapacity alert
-Object obstruction sensor

-Low battery alert 

Price Range

$1,630-$3,030

$500-$920

$2,500-$3,190

$1,900-$2,350

$2,700-$3,030

Distributors

Dealers and online retailers such as HomeDepot, Walmart, Spinlife, Vitality Medical, and more 

Amazon storefront, dealers, and online retailers such as Walmart, Spinlife, and more

Dealers and online retailers such as Spinlife, RehabMart, Direct Supply, and more

Dealers and online retailers such as Spinlife, RehabMart, and more

Dealers and online retailers such as Spinlife, Direct Supply, Vitality Medical, and more

Pros and Cons of Hoyer by Drive Medical Patient Lifts 

Pros:

  • Available at widely-familiar retailers, including Walmart, HomeDepot, and Amazon.
  • The manual design lift #13023 is available for between $500 and $700 at multiple retailers and comes with sling chains for extra security.
  • Multiple bariatric lifts support up to 600 lbs.
  • Generous warranties on several models, such as a limited lifetime warranty for lift frames and a 5 year limited warranty on electronics.

Cons:

  • Although it has many types of floor and active lifts, Drive Medical offers no overhead models.

Invacare 

Most Transparent Pricing

With retail settings in about 100 countries and with roughly 3,400 employees around the world, Invacare is one of the largest producers of home healthcare goods. The company began as part of Technicare in Cleveland during the 1970s, but it split off into its own brand following a merger of its parent company with Johnson & Johnson. Originally focused on wheelchair production, Invacare has always sought to improve the quality of life for those with disabilities. By expanding into producing patient lifts, Invacare increased its ability to help those even with the most limited mobility. 

Most Hoyer lift brands on our list don’t sell directly to customers. Instead, they sell to third party dealers who then turn around and sell to customers. Consequently, most makers of lifts don’t list their own suggested retail prices on their websites. Invacare, however, does. On Invacare’s website, it’s easy to see how the company itself believes its lifts and slings should be valued. Customers can use Invacare’s transparent pricing suggestions as a starting point, comparing retailers’ costs to Invacare’s suggestions.

Overview of Invacare Hoyer Lifts

Below is an overview of the different lift models that are offered by Invacare. Additional lifts are also available and can be found on the Invacare website. 

GHS350

RPS350-1

RPL450-1

9805P

RPL600-1

Lift Style

Manual active lift

Power active lift 

Power floor lift 

Manual floor lift

Power floor lift

Maximum Capacity

350lbs

350lbs

450lbs

450lbs

600lbs

Safety Features

-Non-slip footplate
-Easy sling attachment with low risk of disengagement

-Non-slip footplate
-Low battery alarm
-Easy sling attachment with low risk of disengagement

-Manual lowering back-up
-Low battery alarm
-Boom stops if meets resistance
-Pinch-protection on moving parts

-Allows 360 rotation of patient without sideways sway
Screw-in pin at mast base promotes stability

-Pinch-protection all moving parts
-Manual lowering in cases of power loss
-Boom stops if meets resistance 

Price Range

$860-$1,250

$3,200-$4,000

$2,000-$3,010

$440-$950

$3,160-$3,920

Distributors

Amazon store front, dealers, and online retailers such as Walmart, Vitality Medical, and more

Amazon storefront, dealers, and online retailers such as Walmart, Spinlife, and more

Amazon storefront, dealers, and online retailers such as Walmart, Direct Supply, and more

Amazon storefront, dealers, and online retailers such as Walmart, 4MD Medical, and more

Dealers and online retailers such as RehabMart, Zoro, and more

Pros and Cons of Invacare Patient Lifts

Pros:

  • Invacare sells many replacement parts for its lifts, such as hydraulic pumps and bases, that can be ordered through any dealer.
  • While Invacare makes roughly fourteen sling shapes, they offer these in different sizes and materials, giving customers lots of options.
  • Many lifts feature low-friction casters so they move easily and avoid strain on caregivers.
  • Some lifts have low under-bed clearance and a large lifting range to lift from both the floor and high surfaces.

Cons:

  • No ceiling or freestanding lift options.

Handicare

Largest Sling and Accessory Selection

Handicare, a durable medical equipment company based in Stockholm, Sweden, serves customers in about 20 different countries. The company was founded in 1986 by three men who were in a rehabilitation center due to paralysis. Since that time, Handicare has not stopped innovating for the benefit of patients just like its founders. With an emphasis on accessibility and patient handling, this company serves more customers with in-home care needs than it does hospitals and other institutions. 

For customers looking for slings and accessories that meet specialized needs, Handicare is the go-to brand. Handicare keeps its sling line inclusive with extra large and extra small options as well as options for amputees and other people with unique needs. The accessory line includes technologically advanced machine maintenance accessories as well as basic but functional items like padding for potentially hazardous metal bars.   

Overview of Handicare Hoyer Lifts

Below is an overview of the different lift models that are offered by Handicare. Additional lifts are also available and can be found on the Handicare website. 

EVA450EE

EVA600EE

Minilift200

C-1000 Bariatric Ceiling Lift

AP-450 

Lift Style

Power floor lift

Power floor lift

Power active lift

Ceiling overhead lift

Freestanding overhead lift

Maximum Capacity

450lbs

600lbs

350lbs

1,000lbs

450lbs

Safety Features

-Stable aluminum sling bar with reliable safety latches
-Encapsulated twin casters for easy rolling
-Emergency stop on control box
-Overload indicator

-Stable aluminum sling bar with reliable safety latches
-Encapsulated twin casters for easy rolling
-Emergency stop on control box

-Grip-friendly handles
-Anti-slip footplate
-Easy rolling casters
-Emergency stop on control box

-4 carry bar design and 2 motors to lift torso and legs safely at comfortable angles
-Emergency stop and lowering

-Indicators for strap replacement
-Special hooks keep sling loop in place
-Unsafe tilt detection alerts
-Low battery alert
-Emergency stop and lowering

Price Range

$2,830-$4,980

$5,930-$7,150

$3,840-$5,930

$7,880-$8,540

$2,650-$3,000

Distributors

Dealers

Dealers

Dealers

Dealers

Dealers

Pros and Cons of Handicare Hoyer Patient Lifts 

Pros:

  • Handicare representatives can put you in contact with local dealers in your area.
  • Impressive range of sling designs, with different sizes and a variety of materials, as well as custom sling options.
  • Carries several bariatric lifts, including a ceiling overhead lift that can support 1000lbs.
  • Offers foldable models for easy storage, as well as models with low legs to fit underneath furniture.

Cons:

  • Pricier lifts, with its cheapest models costing thousands of dollars.
  • There are very few online retailers that carry Handicare lifts.

Medline

Best Quality Assurance

The company Medco was founded in 1966, and it eventually morphed into the brand we now know as Medline. Originally focused on producing scrubs for healthcare workers, Medline branched out to offer a wide range of products and services to help hospitals meet patient needs. The modern version of Medline now offers care solutions to both individual consumers and to hospitals and other institutions. In addition to making numerous patient lifts, Medline consults with hospitals to help them reduce care costs and improve efficiency. 

Despite now being a large company with offices across 17 countries, Medline doesn’t stray from its roots of quality and customer care. This is one of the only companies in the industry that takes the time to transparently lay out its community values, responsible business practices, and quality assurance methods in a way that’s easy for consumers to understand. On its website, Medline unambiguously states that if a product has a problem, help with an exchange or a refund is just a call away. 

Overview of Medline Hoyer Lifts

Below is an overview of the different lift models that are offered by Medline. Additional lifts are also available and can be found on the Medline website. 

MDS88200D

MDS700EL

MDS400EL

MDS500SA

MDS600SA

Lift Style

Manual floor lift

Power floor lift

Power active lift

Power active lift

Power active lift

Maximum Capacity

400lbs

700lbs

400lbs

500lbs

600lbs

Safety Features

-Cradle design reduces sway
-Floor pick-up abilities protect caregiver from strain

-Ergonomic hand bars for extra control
-6-point cradle for added support

-Emergency stop and lowering mechanisms

-Fast actuator speed for safe lifting
-Low-profile legs slide under furniture

-Display shows battery charge
-Emergency manual lowering

Price Range

$540-$1,646

$2,500-$3,330

$1650-$2,356

$2,400-$3,650

$2,800-$8,072

Distributors

Dealers, including authorized online retailers like Vitality Medical and RehabMart 

Dealers, including authorized online retailers like Vitality Medical and RehabMart 

Dealers, including authorized online retailers like Vitality Medical and RehabMart 

Dealers, including authorized online retailers like Vitality Medical and RehabMart 

Dealers, including authorized online retailers like Vitality Medical and RehabMart 

Pros and Cons of Medline Hoyer Patient Lifts 

Pros:

  • Gait training options available on some lifts for those who are expected to recover some mobility through physical therapy.
  • Some models feature long-lasting charge batteries that last 80-100 lifts.
  • Latex-free construction enables those with latex allergies to find a lift to suit their needs.
  • Low base options for easy movement beneath and around furniture.

Cons:

  • No direct sales through Medline, and its website is only for businesses to place orders, not average consumers.

Hill-Rom

Best Sling Guide

Hill-Rom, founded in 1929, began with the simple but unusual idea that hospitals should be more like homes. The company initially worked to supply home-like wooden furniture to patient rooms. Decades later, Hill-Rom has acquired several other medical supply brands. Hill-Rom continues to blur the lines between home care and hospital care by bringing medical technology into homes through brands like Liko, Viking, Galvo, and more. Hill Rom’s patient lifts are used worldwide by both professionals and families to supply patients with the safest transfers possible.

Patients and caregivers who shop from Hill-Rom will appreciate how easy the company makes it to explore the available sling options. Customers can enter the patient’s weight range, physical abilities, and lifting needs into an interactive online “smart” sling guide. In real-time, the guide uses the information to produce a list of slings that are most likely to fit the patient. This feature makes shopping for a sling easy despite the numerous options.

Overview of Hill-Rom Hoyer Lifts

Below we created an overview of the different lift models that are offered by Hill-Rom. Additional lifts are also available and can be found on the Hill-Rom website. 

Likorall 250ES

Golvo9000

Viking M

Viking XL

Sabina ll

Lift Style

Power free standing overhead lift

Power floor lift

Power floor lift

Power floor lift

Combination power floor lift and active lift

Maximum Capacity

550lbs

440lbs

452lbs

660lbs

440lbs

Safety Features

-Speed limiter
-Electrical and manual emergency lowering

-Service required and overload indicators
-Quick-release hook system 
-Swing down armrest for extra stability 

-Charge status notification
-System alerts when ready or needs servicing
-Two speed options

-Extra arm provides greater flexibility
-Slingbar gives more space for larger patients
-Indicator alerts when service needed

-Anchor point close to patient for safe and secure raising
-Footrest and calf strap for support
-Emergency stop and lowering
-Slingbar safety latches

Price Range

$5,050-$5,160

$6,300-$6,700

$3,300-$4,500

$7,800-$8,078

$4,280-$5,190

Distributors

Dealers and online retailers such as Spinlife, Adaptive Specialties, and more

Dealers and online retailers such as Adaptive Specialties, Aidacare, and more

Dealers and online retailers such as Spinlife 

Dealers and online retailers such as Spinlife

Dealers and online retailers such as Spinlife, Med Mart, and more

Pros and Cons of Hill-Rom Hoyer Patient Lifts 

Pros:

  • Lifts are made of strong and environmentally-friendly aluminum and equipped with NiMH batteries.
  • Some models show how many lifts have been performed and provide maintenance-needed and overload warnings.
  • Most extensive overhead lift selection of all companies on our list to accommodate patients with different weights and care needs.
  • Offers some low-base models that work around low clearance furniture.

Cons:

  • Pricier lifts, with no cheaper manual models.

Bestcare

Best Overhead Lift

Bestcare, a mobility company with headquarters in Norcross, Georgia, was founded in 1993. The company is now closely affiliated with another medical equipment company, Medline, but it maintains its own line of products. Since its inception, Bestcare has diversified its collection of mobility products by branching into both consumer-grade and institutional-grade versions of patient lifts, not to mention many other forms of transfer aids. This company’s production values include the belief that machines should be made with as universal parts as possible. Bestcare strives to make many of its lift parts compatible with one another and even with other brands. This brand also puts an emphasis on comfort features and affordability.  

The most advanced lift option that Bestcare sells is its Luna Lift, an overhead lift design that boasts full room coverage. For caregivers who are concerned that most available lifts are too limiting, bulky, and difficult to move, Bestcare offers an excellent choice thanks to its innovative overhead track system. 

Overview of Bestcare Hoyer Lifts

Below we created an overview of the different lift models that are offered by Bestcare. Additional lifts are also available and can be found on the Bestcare website. 

PL400H

PL400HE

SA500

SA400H

SA400HE

Lift Style

Manual floor lift

Power floor lift

Power active lift

Manual active lift

Power active lift

Maximum Capacity

400lbs

400lbs

500lbs

400lbs

400lbs

Safety Features

-Durable steel construction
-Six-point sling for safe and secure transfers

-Six-point sling for safe and secure transfers

-Non-slip foot rest
-Warning for low batteries and over capacity loads

-Adjustable cushioned knee pad
-Compact size allows safe clearance in tight spaces

-Adjustable cushioned knee pad
-Compact size allows safe clearance in tight spaces

Price Range

$626-$1,550

$1,100-$2,080

$2,100-$4,320

$899-$1,210

$1,260-$2,080

Distributors

Dealers and online retailers such as AliMed, Wheelchair Liberty, and more

Dealers and online retailers such as RehabMart, Wheelchair Liberty, and more

Dealers and online retailers such as AliMed, Med Mart, and more

Dealers and online retailers such as RehabMart 

Dealers and online retailers such as RehabMart 

Pros and Cons of Bestcare Hoyer Patient Lifts 

Pros:

  • Has retrofit options, such as upgrading its manual PL400H lift with a battery power kit for a low cost.
  • Unique tracks for overhead lifts that are compatible with almost any wall and can provide full room lift access.
  • Updated spreader bars that do not individually swivel for greater simplicity and stability.
  • Offers a downloadable guide for caregivers to use to identify deteriorated slings that need to be replaced.

Cons:

  • Caregivers will most likely need to hire professionals to install specialty tracks for ceiling and wall-mounted lifts.

How to Get Financial Assistance for Hoyer Lifts

There are many financial resources available for those who need a Hoyer lift. Patients can work with Medicare, Medicaid, or Veterans Affairs to cover part of all of the cost of the lift. Private insurance can sometimes cover the costs as well. Finally, there are many disease-specific foundations that provide grants for Hoyer lifts and other equipment that helps patients live easier with their condition.

Hoyer lifts are typically considered ‘durable medical equipment’, or DME. These types of items can be rented or purchased with various forms of insurance covering part or all of the cost. Below, we’ll discuss the coverage options commonly available to seniors for DME.

Medicare Coverage for Hoyer Lifts

Medicare offers coverage for durable medical equipment (DME), including Hoyer lifts. A prescription is needed and coverage is only available for basic systems. As with all Medicare Part B coverage, patients must pay their deductible before having 80% of the cost of their lift covered by the program. Medicare might determine that you may only rent the equipment in certain circumstances.

When obtaining durable medical equipment through Medicare, an accepted supplier is required. Use the Medicare supplier search tool to find companies that supply Hoyer lifts and are covered by Medicare.

Medicaid Coverage for Hoyer Lifts

Medicaid coverage for durable medical equipment (DME) can be used for covering part or all of the cost of a Hoyer lift. Every state has different waiter programs for DME and these programs can change over time, so be sure to check with your state’s Medicaid program for more information.

State

Medicaid Coverage Waiver for Durable Medical Equipment

Waiver Program Information

State Medicaid Contact

Alabama

The State of Alabama Independent Living (SAIL) Waiver

334-242-5000

Alabama

The Alabama Community Transition (ACT) Waiver

334-242-5000

Alaska

Alaskans Living Independently Program

800-780-9972

Alaska

The Alaska Adults with Physical and Developmental Disabilities Waiver

800-780-9972

Arizona

855-432-7587

Colorado

N/A

N/A

800-221-3943

Connecticut

N/A

N/A

800-842-1508

District of Columbia

N/A

N/A

202-645-4614

Florida

The Florida Statewide Medicaid Managed Care (SMMC) Long-Term Care Program

877-711-3662

Georgia

N/A

N/A

404-651-9982

Hawaii

N/A

N/A

808-524-3370

Illinois

HealthChoice Illinois

800-843-6154

Illinois

The Medicare-Medicaid Alignment Initiative (MMAI)

800-843-6154

Indiana

800-457-4584

Indiana

The Older Americans Act Program

800-457-4584

Massachusetts

N/A

N/A

800-841-2900

Minnesota

651-431-2700

Missouri

N/A

N/A

800-735-2466

Montana

800-362-8312

New Mexico

N/A

N/A

888-997-2583

North Dakota

800-472-2622

Ohio

800-324-8680

Ohio

800-324-8680

Oregon

800-527-5772

Pennsylvania

The Pennsylvania Department of Aging (PDA) Waiver

800-692-7462

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania Self-Directed Services

800-692-7462

Pennsylvania

The Pennsylvania Physical HealthChoices Program

800-692-7462

Rhode Island

The Rhode Island Global Consumer Choice Compact Waiver

401-462-5300

South Carolina

South Carolina Community Choices Waiver

888-549-0820

South Dakota

The South Dakota HOPE Waiver

800-597-1603

Tennessee

The Tennessee CHOICES Program

800-342-3145

Texas

The Texas STAR+PLUS Waiver

877-541-7905

Utah

The Utah Aging Waiver

800-662-9651

Utah

The Utah Medicaid New Choices Waiver

800-662-9651

Vermont

The Vermont Global Commitment to Health Waiver

800-250-8427

Vermont

The Vermont CFC Moderate Needs Group Services Program

800-250-8427

Virginia

The Virginia Commonwealth Coordinated Care (CCC) Plus Waiver

804-786-7933

Washington

The Washington Community Options Program Entry System Waiver (COPES)

800-562-3022

Washington

The Washington New Freedom Program

800-562-3022

Washington

The Washington Medicaid Alternative Care (MAC) Program

800-562-3022

West Virginia

N/A

N/A

800-642-8589

Wisconsin

The Wisconsin Family Care and Partnership Program

800-362-3002

Wisconsin

The Wisconsin Include, Respect, I Self-Direct (IRIS) Program

800-362-3002

Wyoming

N/A

N/A

866-571-0944

Money Follows the Person Program

In addition to the above waivers, Medicaid’s Money Follows the Person Program (MFP) can help cover the cost of a Hoyer lift. This program is designed to help reduce the need for patients to stay in nursing or community facilities by providing funds to go towards the tools needed for them to live at home or with loved ones. The MFP page offers more detailed information on the program and how to apply.

Veterans Resources for Affordable Hoyer Lifts

Veterans Affairs provides coverage for a wide range of durable medical equipment. Veterans who need a Hoyer lift must already be a member of VA Healthcare (those who are not members can apply here). Members can then apply for durable medical equipment by supplying the VA with a doctor’s prescription. 

To apply for VA Healthcare:

  • Check your eligibility for VA healthcare. Most veterans with honorable discharge status will qualify for coverage.
  • Gather relevant information, including your Social Security Card, your military discharge papers (DD214), current insurance information (private coverage, Medicare, and Medicaid), and your most recent household tax returns.
  • Fill out VA Form 10-10EZ to apply for coverage. Alternatively, you can apply with assistance by contacting your local Veterans Services Organization

Additional Financial Resources for Hoyer Lifts

Beyond Medicare, Medicaid, and VA coverage, there are more options for covering the cost of a Hoyer lift. Some programs offer financial assistance, while others may be able to offer Hoyer lifts for free. 

Nonprofit Organizations 

There are many nonprofits that offer discounted or free durable medical equipment. Organizations like Goodwill frequently receive medical equipment, and contacting local stores can guide you to the equipment you need. Additionally, many disease-specific foundations offer grants to help patients obtain equipment and medicine to help fight their disease. Research foundations that focus on helping patients live more comfortably with their ailment, and see if they have a grant program available.

Every state has a variety of nonprofits that specialize in helping connect people in need with inexpensive DME. We created the table below to help you get started connecting with medical equipment banks and other related services in your state.

State

Resource

Services

Contact

Alabama

STAR helps people access assistive technology. The organization offers training, demonstrations and short-term equipment loans. It has alternative finance options and an equipment reuse program.

(800) 782-7656

Alaska

ATLA has an information service that educates Alaskans about the benefits of AT. Seniors can also access demonstrations, need assessments and short-term equipment loans. ATLA can help people access low-cost or free DME.

(800) 723-2852

Arizona

AzTAP offers demonstrations, training, technical assistance and consultations to help people access and use AT effectively. It also has affordable finance options and facilitates an online equipment exchange. 

(800) 477-9921

Arkansas

Arkansas' iCAN offers a reuse program and helps seniors access free and low-cost devices. In addition, there’s an information service, seminars and training that make it easier to find an appropriate device and use it effectively.

(800) 828-2799

California

Ability Tools is part of the California Foundation for Independent Living Centers. It offers equipment loans and a demonstration center to help people find the right device. Seniors can access its equipment exchange service and a reuse program. In addition, it offers financial loans and a repair fund to help fix broken wheelchairs.

(800) 900-0706

Colorado

Colorado’s ATAP offers assessments so people understand what devices can help them in their homes. It has demonstrations and training to help you get the most out of your device and equipment loans so you can try them before you buy. The organization also has funding assistance and can help residents find free and low-cost devices.

(800) 255-3477

Connecticut

CTTAP provides increased access to technology through device loans, demonstrations and a low-interest financial loan program. It also works with a community partner that refurbishes and sells used equipment at a significant discount.

(800) 537-2549

Delaware

DATI has resource centers that offer demonstrations and short-term equipment loans. Seniors can work with specialists to find AT solutions that meet their needs. The organization also facilitates an equipment exchange program.

(800) 870-3284

District of Columbia

The DC Assistive Technology Program runs a DME recycling program that provides devices to eligible residents free of charge. It also offers educational services, demonstrations and short-term equipment loans. Residents can access alternative financing solutions through the organization. 

(202) 547-0198

Florida

FAAST provides training, demonstrations and information to Floridians to promote AT use. A financing program can help people afford devices and the organization also has equipment loans and a reuse program.

(844) 353-2278

Georgia

Georgia Tools for Life can assess seniors' needs to help them find the right assistive device. They also offer demonstrations, equipment loans and help to find alternative funding. The reused equipment program provides people with free or low-cost devices.

(404) 894-0541

Hawaii

ATRC has a loan program so people can try equipment before making a final decision about purchasing. It also offers training, technical assistance and low-interest financial loans.

(808) 532-7110

Idaho

IATP provides information and education to encourage the use of DME. It offers assessments to assist with choosing the right device and low-interest financial loans can help people buy the equipment they need. Additionally, IATP has device loans, demonstrations, training and an equipment exchange. 

(800) 432-8324

Illinois

IATP offers demonstrations, training and financial loans to help people choose and purchase the right assistive device. A reuse program provides free equipment to eligible residents and the organization also hosts an equipment exchange program.

(800) 852-5110

Indiana

INDATA provides assistive device resources to Indianans of all ages and abilities. Short-term equipment loans are available and the organization offers demonstrations and training to help you make the most of your device. It has financial assistance, a refurbishment program and an equipment exchange. 

(888) 466-1314

Iowa

Easterseals Iowa Assistive Technology Program offers demonstrations, equipment loans and needs assessments to people throughout the state. The organization can also help people find financial assistance to purchase devices.

(866) 866-8272

Kansas

ATK provides demonstrations, information and training to Kansans. Its specialists are available to assess seniors' needs and its equipment loans allow you to try before you buy. ATK also has a reuse and recycle program.

(800) 526-3648

Kentucky

KATS Network offers demonstrations and has a library program that provides short-term equipment loans. Its refurbishment program redistributes devices to people in need and the organization can help you find financial assistance.

(800) 327-5287

Louisiana

LATAN provides information, advice and technical assistance to Louisianans who need AT. It has equipment loans and can also help people find alternative sources of DME funding.

(800) 270-6185

Maine

Maine CITE improves access to assistive devices through equipment loans, demonstrations and training. The organization also runs an equipment exchange program to help people buy and sell gently used devices.

(207) 621-3195

Maryland

MDTAP offers demonstrations, consultations and low-interest loans to people who need AT. It facilitates an equipment exchange program and has devices for loan at library locations around the state. 

(800) 832-4827

Massachusetts

MassMATCH has regional centers across the state that offer equipment loans, demonstrations, information and advice. It provides refurbished equipment for free to eligible residents and its alternative finance programs can help people fund DME purchases.

(877) 508-3974

Michigan

MATP maintains a directory of devices, funding, training, repairers and more to help Michigan residents access AT. It also offers equipment loans and demonstrations and facilitates an equipment exchange program for those who want to sell or buy used devices.

(800) 578-0280

Minnesota

The STAR program has device demonstrations and short-term loans available to help seniors choose equipment that can best help them. It also offers open-ended equipment loans for longer-term needs. The organization supports DME reuse through several programs, including an equipment exchange program.

(888) 234-1267

Mississippi

Project START increases Mississippians' access to DME through equipment loans, demonstrations and a reuse and refurbishment program.

(800) 852-8328

Missouri

Missouri Assistive Technology has demonstration centers throughout the state where people can see and try devices. There’s also an equipment loan service and alternative funding programs that help people access DME. 

(800) 647-8557

Montana

MonTECH can assess seniors' needs and make suggestions about devices to help them live independently. Its equipment loan program can ship many items free of charge anywhere in the state. MonTECH also has a financial loan program and runs an equipment exchange. 

(406) 243-5511

Nebraska

Nebraska ATP has device demonstrations and short-term equipment loans available. It can help people find funding sources for DME purchases and also runs an equipment exchange where people can buy and sell used equipment. 

(877) 713-4002

Nevada

NATC provides information and advice to Nevadans who would benefit from assistive devices. Seniors can access demonstrations, equipment loans and repair services. In addition, it has a refurbishment program that gives away equipment to people in need. 

(775) 687-0835

New Hampshire

ATinNH provides information, education and training to people throughout the state. Those interested in using AT can attend demonstrations or borrow devices to try at home. It also partners with organizations that refurbish equipment to sell at greatly reduced prices.

(603) 862-4320

New Jersey

The Assistive Technology Advocacy Center has equipment loans available and seniors can access device demonstrations. The center also runs a reuse program that provides low-cost equipment to people in need.

(800) 922-7233

New Mexico

NMTAP provides equipment loans, demonstrations and device training to promote the use of AT in the state. Seniors can also access a financial loan program and a reutilization program provides gently used equipment.

(877) 696-1470

New York

TRAID has regional centers across New York where people can find local assistance. It provides hands-on training, and its equipment loans let residents try devices before purchase. TRAID also has reutilization programs around the state that accept donations of used equipment. 

(800) 624-4143

North Carolina

The North Carolina Assistive Technology Program allows seniors to borrow equipment and offers demonstrations to help people choose the most appropriate device. It also reutilizes used equipment. 

(919) 855-3500

North Dakota

North Dakota Assistive has demonstrations, short-term equipment loans and a reuse program. It helps residents access loans and grants for funding DME and the Senior Safety Program provides some types of equipment free of charge to eligible people aged 60 and over.

(800) 895-4728

Ohio

AT Ohio has a device lending library and also offers demonstrations, training and technical assistance. The refurbishment and reuse program helps people access second-hand DME. 

(800) 784-3425

Oklahoma

ABLE Tech focuses on demonstrations, device loans and reutilization of used equipment. It offers education and training to people interested in AT and has low-interest loans available for those who need help purchasing devices.

(800) 257-1705

Oregon

Access Technologies, Inc. has information services to help people find alternative finance options and affordable DME. It also provides demonstrations and device loans, allowing people to explore their AT options.

(800) 677-7512

Pennsylvania

TechOWL has a device lending library, used equipment program and device demonstrations. It also has a unique program that uses 3D printer technology to design personalized devices and makes them for free to meet the needs of disabled people. 

(800) 204-7428

Rhode Island

Rhode Island ATAP is an umbrella organization made up of groups with specific AT focuses such as education, independent living and telephone equipment. Each organization provides equipment loans, demonstrations and reuse programs. 

(401) 462-7873

South Carolina

SCATP has specialists available that demonstrate devices and conduct training and workshops. The refurbishment program distributes devices to people in need. Seniors can also access equipment through short-term loans and the exchange program.

(800) 915-4522

South Dakota

DakotaLink offers consultations that can help people identify their device needs. It also has demonstrations, device loans and used equipment for sale. The program provides low-interest loans to eligible people to help them purchase DME.

(800) 645-0673

Tennessee

TTAP increases access to AT through funding assistance, demonstrations and short-term device loans. It also has a device reutilization program to help people purchase used equipment. 

(800) 732-5059

Texas

Texans can visit one of the 17 TTAP demonstration centers around the state to ask questions, see devices in use and borrow equipment. The organization also has a reuse program and can help residents find financial assistance options. 

(800) 828-7839

Utah

UATP has three locations where people can see devices in use and borrow AT to try at home. It also runs a reuse program and equipment exchange service.

(800) 524-5152

Vermont

VATP offers assessments by access specialists that allow people to identify their needs, try different devices and choose the most appropriate equipment. It also provides device loans, helps people find financial assistance and runs an equipment exchange.

(800) 750-6355

Virginia

VATS helps people access affordable AT and DME through an equipment exchange program and a refurbishment program that redistributes devices. It also offers demonstrations, equipment loans and advice for finding low-interest financial loans.

(800) 552-5019

Washington

WATAP has a device lending program and offers equipment demonstrations. There’s a reuse program and equipment exchange to help people find affordable DME and the organization can help seniors find alternative financing options.

(800) 214-8731

West Virginia

WVATS has an assessment survey that can help you identify devices that meet your needs and it also lets you borrow equipment to try at home. It has demonstrations, training and technical assistance. The organization also has a reuse program that provides free equipment to eligible West Virginians. 

(800) 841-8436

Wisconsin

Seniors can access information on selecting and using assistive devices through WisTech. The program offers demonstrations, training and equipment loans. It has a reutilization program and equipment exchange service, as well as financial loans available for those who need help purchasing a device.

(608) 266-9354

Wyoming

WATR can answer questions about assistive devices, helping people choose and fund their DME. Seniors can also access demonstrations and a reuse program. Additionally, WATR has equipment loans available, including WyRamp, allowing people to borrow access ramps for their homes. 

(888) 989-9463

Private Insurance

Private insurance sometimes covers durable medical equipment, including Hoyer lifts. Contact your private insurer or employer to inquire if a Hoyer lift is covered, if purchase or rental is covered, and what percentage is covered. You will likely need to pay a deductible before insurance coverage takes care of part of the purchase or rental.

Payment Plans

Due to the high cost of Hoyer lifts, most suppliers understand the difficulty a patient may have in paying for their products outright. Many companies offer payment plans, allowing patients to pay for the lift over a few months or even a full year. In some cases, these payment plans may even feature a 0% interest rate. Be sure to look at the financing page of a supplier’s website to see the types of options and rates they offer.

Buyers Guide: How To Choose A Hoyer Lift

Hoyers Lift Buyers Guide

There are many different lift types to choose from; however, there are a few steps caregivers and patients should take before making any final decisions or purchases. Following the five steps below will help ensure both patients and caregivers have found the very best lift for their unique circumstances. They can then purchase a lift with confidence. 

Step 1: Check in with the Patient and Their Healthcare Team

It’s crucial that you communicate with both the patient and his or her healthcare team before buying a Hoyer lift. Take the time to clearly explain your physical limits and why you need to purchase a lift for caregiving. If the doctor agrees that a Hoyer lift is necessary, ask him or her to give you any suggestions on which style or features will benefit the patient best.

In addition to communicating your needs and concerns, listen to the patient’s perspective. Being moved by a machine may seem unstable to the patient, even though in reality it could be much safer than moving them without a lift. Let the patient know that the first few times you use a lift it may be bumpy or frightening because it will be new to both of you. Be encouraging by emphasizing that it will be better after the learning phase, and listen carefully to see if the patient has any concerns about the safety and function of particular lift styles. Proceed with caution and medical advice if the patient has any phobias related to heights or confinement. 

Step 2: Consider Your Financial Options

The price of Hoyer lifts ranges from a few hundred dollars to several thousand, depending on the brand, design, and extra features. In any case, you may not have to pay the whole cost of a lift out of pocket. Below you’ll find details on a few financial assistance avenues that you can explore. Getting answers to financial help inquiries often takes time and paperwork, so start looking into your options early on in the buying process.

Medicare

Medicare covers Hoyer lifts as “Durable Medical Equipment” (DME) under certain conditions and with a prescription from a Medicare doctor. Medicare dictates strict definitions of “need” for prescribing and will only pay for the most basic manual lifts. It may help to be extremely specific about any pain, unsteadiness, dizziness, or other safety concerns that you have when lifting the patient. The more detail the doctor has, the more accurately she or he can assess how great the need is. 

If a Medicare doctor prescribes a Hoyer lift, you’ll be liable for 20% of the item’s cost, plus any deductible you have under Medicare Part B. Additionally, Medicare only covers lifts from certain suppliers. To find a Hoyer lift supplier, it’s best to use the Supplier Directory provided on the official Medicare website. In some cases, Medicare may require you to rent rather than buy a lift.

Medicaid

If the patient is enrolled in Medicaid, inquire if you have coverage for DME. Medicaid coverage varies by location, so you’ll want to speak with the experts in your area. For those who have been in a nursing home or other institution and who want to return to home care, a local Money Follows the Person (MFP) program may be able to provide assistance. Follow the link to find out if your state participates in this type of program. 

Insurance

Private insurance coverage varies dramatically from plan to plan, and getting a straight answer from a provider on the coverage of lifts may take some time and patience. Still, it’s worth looking into the possibility. Keep in mind that insurance can often be used in combination with Medicare.  Like Medicare, insurance may require that you rent rather than buy.

Nonprofit Organizations

If the patient has a particular condition that limits their mobility, look for disease-specific foundations that provide financial assistance to those with the condition. You may also want to find out if there’s a particular organization in your area that provides DME or home improvement assistance to those with mobility concerns.  

Payment Plans

Many large medical equipment dealers partner with banks or other companies to offer payment plans. Payment plans from Affirm and Paypal are especially common online. A payment plan may help you afford a lift when you don’t have the full amount upfront but you do have a reliable monthly income. Keep in mind that payments vary based on credit and other factors. Additionally, a payment plan may cost you more in the long run due to interest. 

Step 3: Ask the Right Questions on Lift and Sling Features

Whenever possible, obtain guidance from doctors or experienced occupational therapists on what kind of lift and sling the patient needs. If you have consulted experts but still feel like the choices you have are too broad, the following questions may help you narrow your options:

  • Weight: Is the patient’s weight within the safe working load for the lift and sling? 
  • Space: How will the shape of the lift work in the room(s) you intend to use it in? Will you need to move furniture, carpet, or other potential hazards to allow for easier movement? Is the space more suited to an overhead lift or a floor lift?
  • Tasks: What is the purpose of the transfers being made with the lift? Will the lift be used for transport to a chair, for using a bedside commode, or for some other purpose? Will you need multiple slings for different tasks? Does the lift need to be able to reach a person on the floor?
  • Abilities: Is the patient able to hold up his or her neck and head? Does the patient need extra support from a high back sling, or does the patient have specialized needs due to amputation, spasticity, or other conditions? Do you as a caregiver have any limitations that will make a manual lift impractical? Should the patient be using an active “sit to stand lift,” or does the patient need a passive lift that requires no work on his or her part? 
  • Extras: How interested are you in adding extras to your basic lift and sling setup? Will you want a digital scale attachment to monitor the patient’s weight? Do you think padding for some of the bars is a necessary safety precaution? Would you like your lift to have a digital display, extra batteries, extra charging ports, or any other accessory?

Step 4: Shop Multiple Retailers 

Very few patient lift manufacturers sell directly to customers and those that do often sell over the phone rather than online. In most cases, you’ll end up purchasing through a third-party dealer, either online or in person. In addition to online stores that exclusively sell mobility products, you’ll also find lifts at online marketplaces like Walmart and Amazon. It’s possible that the particular lift model you want will only be available at one or two locations, but in many cases, it will be offered at several different stores.

If you’re able to find your desired model at several locations, consider the following factors in addition to the base cost when making your choice:

  • Shipping: Is shipping free, a flat fee, or variable by location? How much does it raise the cost? You may need to call the retailer to calculate shipping without checking out.
  • Sling: Slings can cost anywhere from about $30 to a few hundred dollars. Do any of the companies offer a low base price and a free sling? Would the free sling work for the patient? Does buying the lift at one retailer and a compatible sling at another save you any money?
  • Customer Service: How much help from customer service do you need? Consider whether you’d like to see a lift in action at a showroom before buying. Also consider whether the company cooperates with Medicare or other forms of insurance (if applicable).
  • Assembly: Some lifts can be assembled without tools, others require minimal tools, and some require significant installation. For instance, you may need to hire someone to install the tracks of a ceiling lift. If so, enquire about the cost of this with the manufacturer or dealer.  You may want to get a quote on installation for multiple ceiling lifts to determine which is the best deal overall. 

Step 5: Get Training and Read the Manual

Before selecting a lift, it’s important to make sure that proper training resources are available.  An occupational therapist, a nurse, a home health aid, or some other healthcare professional should be able to assist you. Ask for a recommendation from a doctor if you’re not sure who to consult for training. Using the lift on someone without a disability before you use it on the patient may be helpful. It’s going to take some time to learn how to use the controls and slings with ease.

In addition to getting some hands-on training from a professional, you should also read the manual and watch any how-to videos with care. These materials can help you understand the limitations of the machine that may not at first be obvious. They can also help you understand how to charge and keep the lift in good working condition.

Frequently Asked Questions

Hoyer Life FAQs

Are Hoyer lifts covered by Medicare?

Hoyer lifts can be covered by Medicare, but only in limited circumstances. Generally, to be eligible, the patient needs to be bed-bound unless he or she has the assistance of two other people. A Medicare doctor has to write a prescription for the lift, and you’ll have to make a patient lift purchase from an eligible supplier. Medicare will typically cover very basic manual lifts, and the patient will be responsible for 20% of the cost plus any deductibles. Always check with the appropriate Medicare representatives if you are unsure how to proceed in the process of getting a Hoyer lift covered.

What are the biggest safety concerns when operating a Hoyer lift?

With a Hoyer lift, there is some danger of the lift tipping if it’s used improperly. There is also a danger of skin or limbs getting pinched in moving parts or of the patient falling from an improperly-fastened sling. Finally, if the caregiver is not careful during operation, the patient’s legs or any part of his or her body could inadvertently hit a bar, a nearby piece of furniture, or a wall. To avoid all of these dangers, it’s important that manufacturer directions be followed with meticulous attention to detail. 

Always check to see that the patient is within the weight limit of the lift and is using a sling that is appropriate for her or his body and abilities. Make sure that the area is clear of obstacles and that the sling is properly attached to the lift. Check for wear and tear from time to time. Finally, always give the task of transferring the patient your full attention, visually and verbally confirming that the patient is safe throughout the operation. 

Can I rent a Hoyer lift during a recovery period?

If a patient has had surgery or is recovering from an injury, they may wish or need to use a lift on a temporary basis. Thankfully, many lifts- both electric and manual- can be rented. Prices vary depending on location and other factors, but you’ll usually need to put down a deposit (perhaps of $100) and then pay a fee based on the number of days you use the lift. Some rental places may charge $25 or more per day, so if you’re using it for more than a couple of weeks it may be more economical to buy a manual lift.  

Can one caregiver safely operate a Hoyer lift?

This may depend on the brand and model, but in general, a Hoyer lift can be operated by one caregiver. However, hospitals, nursing homes, and other institutions require that two people operate the lift for added safety and to avoid lawsuits. Before operating a lift at home alone, check with the manufacturer that one-person operation is acceptable for home use. In some cases, having a second person to steady the sling as it ascends or descends can make the patient more comfortable even though it may not technically be necessary.  

What kind of maintenance costs does a Hoyer lift have?

Like most mechanical devices, a Hoyer lift will need occasional maintenance to keep it working properly. The most common maintenance cost you’ll have is battery replacement. Some companies suggest replacing the battery every 18-24 months, but this can vary depending on the brand of lift and the type of battery used. Always check the manual. Aside from that, you may need to replace parts due to wear and tear over time. 

Many dealers allow you to purchase practically any replacement part through their website, and sometimes you may be able to have a service person from the manufacturer visit your home to replace a part for a fee. Always enquire about both dealer and manufacturer policies on repairs and the availability of spare parts. In some cases, repairs may be partially covered by a limited warranty, typically of one to five years in length.