(800) 973-1540

How much does a live-in caregiver cost?

21 answers | Last updated: Oct 02, 2014
64px-hh6b80fd52d1
Q
An anonymous caregiver asked...
I need some basic information as to what the ball park cost would be to have someone or ones come into my home on a 24/7 basis to care for an elderly woman in early middle stage dementia. She used the bathroom three times an hour during the night and gets quite confused.
 

Answers
Caring.com User - Ann Cason
Caring.com Expert
Send a Hug or Prayer
Send a Hug or Prayer
A
As Founder and Director of Circles of Care, Ann Cason provides caregiving, consulting, and training services to individuals and public and private organizations involved...
68% helpful
answered...

Live-in caregivers cost from $700 to $3000 a week. There are many factors such as what part of the country you live in, what the living accommodations are and what See also:
How to Pay for In-Home Care

See all 144 questions about Sleep Problems
hours the person is required to be on duty. The ability to speak the elder's language is also a factor.

When the elder is up most of the night, you may have to pay someone to come in on an hourly basis. Many women who provide night time care, count on being able to sleep enough on the job, so that they can also hold down a day time job. Often, this creates more suffering in the home. The elder suffers and the caregiver suffers even more.

Have you taken this elderly woman to the doctor to find out what is causing the frequesnt urination at night. Often there is medication for this condition.

In my experience, young people work well for overnight care. Try to hire two people in their 20's or 30's who take turns on the night shift. Have them work from 10 p.m. to 6 or 8 a.m. Then find a person who needs part time work for a few hours in the day. Or find some one who will live in and fix bereakfast and dinner in exchange for room and board and stipend.

You could hire a professional care manager to supervise and support the helpers. Or you could do it yourself.

Think about what it is you need to continue taking care. Try to find enough care to form a team, a circle of care, people who will share. Try to create a feeling of sisterhood or brotherhood with the helpers.Then you can all work together for the benefit of all.

Call home care agencies to research charges and services. Call professional geriatric care mangers. Make an appointment with the doctor, Call the senior center to ask about local day care programs. Ask friends how to find helpers.

 

More Answers
64px-hh6b80fd52d1
43% helpful
An anonymous caregiver answered...

VERY similar sit'n in Westchester Co, NY and the agency is charging $210 per diem. Bro-in-Law was fed up being there, so jumped on first offer. Probably available for much less, esp considering the youth options in the first answer.

 

60% helpful
BillF answered...

I would have to agree with Ann. But I would be careful about just hiring any youth to care for an aging parent during the night.

Even when using an in-care agency it is important to know what screening they do for their caregivers. Each one has their own set of background checks and research.

If you have any more specific questions, I hope that you will visit our blog and ask one of our experts. We are even giving away Starbucks cards for the best questions. Check it out here.

 

11% helpful
Chief answered...

I have been a Nurse for 40 years, and am presently Director of Resident Care for Loyalton of Ravenna, in Ohio. All of your Adult Care Issues, Independent, Assisted, Nursing, Day Care, Respite, Hospice, etc. can be answered by contacting any Emeritus Senior Living Community. We are in 34 States. Or go to www.emeritus.com for helpful information.

In Good Health,

Janet Girecky, LPN,LVN/RCD

 

64px-hh6b80fd52d1
47% helpful
An anonymous caregiver answered...

The home care I hired is an hourly rate, the more hours, the cheaper the rate. In our situation, 24/7 is about $16 per hour. This is for companionship, medication reminders, light housekeeping, shopping, laundry, taking them to doctors appts, helping with toileting (especially at night when they need to go but are still in a sleep haze and present a fall risk.) They are not medically trained and cannot administer meds. At home nursing care in our area runs about $35 - $45 per hour. There are also adult day care centers that can suppliment the cost, one nearest to Mom and Dad charges $35 - $65 per day depending on level of attention needed and whether or not you need van transport. Keep in mind that socialization is important to their emotional well-being. Not only would day-care be cheaper, but it can be better, emotionally, for your loved one.

 

64px-hh6b80fd52d1
11% helpful
An anonymous caregiver answered...

unfortunatly , the children are so cheap , they don't want to spend some money for the parents , in most cases , it's parents money and they deserve to have the best care and the best care giver .

 

14% helpful
Sashasmom answered...

My mom is mentally on top of her game, but physically she is impaired. She needs help with getting out of bed in the morning, needs someone to clean her and change her depends, she needs help getting dressed, combing her hair, showering, fixing her meals, she has only the use of her right arm. She needs someone to fix her meals twice a day, doing her grocery shopping, her light house keeping, her laundry, etc. How much should I pay someone who does not have a certificate, and lives-in to take care of my mom?

 

64px-hh6b80fd52d1
56% helpful
An anonymous caregiver answered...

as a live-in caregiver, i sell myself too short. when hiring a live-in, please remember that living in is a perk for safety and should NOT be considered part of the compensation. Food is tricky, as most people are not on the same diet as the elder; therefore, causing the caregiver to spend their money on food.
when you consider the cost of sending one to a facility, a live-in should be compensated competitively. remember that this person will have personal expenses and taxes to pay. i tend to take too little, as i understand the fixed income and lack of financial support from children.

 

60% helpful
djopgenort answered...

I like the "circle of support" answer, as it most closely resembles what I've seen work (I live in a community where many people are "aging in place" -- neighbor is 97, & has one "night person", two "day nurses" who alternate). Bartering accomodations for care is a great concept, & CAN work well (can also be a nightmare with mismatched people!). It's important to be absolutely honest about care needed -- the two biggest problems I've observed is "glossing over" the level of care really needed, & overburdening one person (24/7 caregiving is the fast track for burnout)

 

50% helpful
djopgenort answered...

BTW, Don't "age profile"! Several of the best caregivers I've seen were in their late 60s or even early 70s! They had more patience, empathy, common sense & were more "on the same page" as their patients.

 

64px-hh6b80fd52d1
33% helpful
An anonymous caregiver answered...

FIrst, it will depend on where the senior lives. The area's economy will suggest what is paid.
Second, it will depend on the income of the senior. When a senior is on a fixed income, the budget will dictate what can be paid. Third, it depends on who you find. There are many competent people who will work for very little. Since a senior's income might be $2000 per month and they have bills to pay, a live-in caregiver might be paid $700 per month.

I have taken as little as $600/mo and no more than $1200. Although I have heard of people in affluent areas making $4000/mo.

If you need 24/7, your best bet is to hire a live-in. However, you will have to provide for time off and that might cost you more, if you can not provide that relief.

 

64px-hh6b80fd52d1
75% helpful
An anonymous caregiver answered...

As a seasoned RN who's worked in ltc facilities (skilled, assisted)and as a private caregiver (both under agency as well as private arrangement w/families) and as a family caregiver,my advice to families considering homecare for their loved ones is this: do your homework! As said earlier,look around, call around. But please don't be swayed by rhetoric eg that going through an agency is necessarily best because they "screen" people? Fact is, you can get very good caregivers through a newspaper ad or a nursing agency, and you can also get very bad ones. Think critically about those offering advice but are really just promoting their own healthcare agency/facility "for all your needs".

As a former GNA and CNA,how many homecare agencies and facilities are operated by people who've actually toiled as caregivers? Care-giving is hard work,and while it would be lovely to be compensated fairly by our employers,money shouldn't be the driving factor here.Many families also don't realize there's a huge gap btwn what's charged to the client,and what's offered as compensation to the aide.As someone else pointed out earlier, having a safe place to stay is considered a necessary labor condition, not part of a remuneration package. Granted, families do have budgets, but you really get what you pay for;Would you have your own child under the watch of someone from whom you're expecting quality childcare in exchange for free rm&board? Same logic applies.

 

64px-hh6b80fd52d1
20% helpful
An anonymous caregiver answered...

I use a caregiver in the Massachusetts area and pay around 1500 a month for 24 hour live in (they take the weekend days off). I also have a service: Prime Medical Alert[primemedicalalert.com] that my father uses to supplement the service when the caregiver is gone. It works out pretty nicely; you have to make sure the caregiver is reliable. I would recommend a background check.

 

50% helpful
MyerLemon answered...

I am currently a care-giver in Southern California for my 93 year old great aunt. She suffers from short-term memory loss, has stability issues causing her to use a walker, and can not be left alone.

Tasks: makes meals, safety and medication reminder, takes to appointments, purchases groceries and walks, call 911after a huge fall, making sure she is comfortable, safe, and joy.

Compensation: $100/day for 5 days/week Full-time residency free

Extra: Until a month ago I wad able to leave during the day + return in evenings for meals + meds. This had been an ideal set-up because I am a freelance designer and could go on meetings. However after the holidays her balance has significantly gotten worse to a point she needs 24 hour care. Considering requesting a pay increase or inform them to get additional help.

 

64px-hh6b80fd52d1
60% helpful
An anonymous caregiver answered...

I'm paying $175 a day for live-in caregiver in South Florida. Another caregiver comes to help hoist the patient out of bed and bathe her 3 times a week @ $15 per hr. (The live-in cannot move the patient by herself.) If the 2nd caregiver comes to fill in while the live-in goes to the store or to attend to her own needs, like going to get a haircut or dentist, the live-in still gets paid $175 for the whole day, plus the hourly rate for caregiver #2. The patient has advanced end-stage Alzheimers. She has required this level of care for 2 years. All in all, it's about $5250 a month plus expenses of the home, like water, electric, housecleaner, etc. The patient is my parent, and the money is running out.

 

64px-hh6b80fd52d1
43% helpful
An anonymous caregiver answered...

Do you people think we work for free, I've been doing caregiving for 19 years and its tough and very stressful ! If the relatives think we are to expensive, then why don't they tend to their own parents ?

 

38% helpful
HawaiianFood answered...

My mother lives with me; she is 97 and has moderate to severe dementia. I quit my job to care for her. I'm paid $1000 a month. But she pays the rent. However, it's pretty much unbearable. I feel like I have no life and I am sacrificing my own stable future because of my lack of income and not contributing to a 401k, etc. I am going to hire a live-in caregiver and rent a 2-bedroom 2 bath apt. for her to stay in. i I'll share a bedroom with my mom. I have $1500 month to pay, and that's all. She'll have evenings and weekends free. This is all I can afford and I will do everything I can to assist the caregiver. I don't agree that providing room & board is just providing a safe environment! Any more than I think a live-in apartment manager is being given a safe environment. I don't think anybody expects a caregiver to work for free. Some of us just don't have any more than to spend, and that's it. I sympathize, but that's all I have.

 

50% helpful
AHUSBAND answered...

MY WIFE IS GETTING PAID FOR ADULT CARE FOR A 91 YR OLD LADY at the rate of $13 AN HOUR. SHE IS PART TIME AND HAS THE FOLOWING TASKS: makes meals, medication reminder, takes to appointments, calls 911 for emergencies, makes sure she is comfortable and happy. She also does some lite house work incuding laundry and pet care (SHE HAS 4 CATS). SHE NORMALLY ONLY WORKS ABOUT 10 HOURS A WEEK, AND HAS STAYED WITH HER OVERNIGHT ON THE WEEKEND AND ONLY CHARGED $40 FOR THE NIGHT AND 10 TO 8 REGULAR HOURLY RATE FOR THE SATURDAY AND SUNDAY DAY PORTION OF THE WEEKEND. I BELIEVE THAT SHE IS UNDER CHARGING THE CLIENT AND I KNOW THE LADY'S DAUGHTER CAN AFFORD MORE. EVEN THOUGH THE DAUGHTER COMPLAINS THE EXTRA CHARGE IF SHE RELIEVES MY WIFE LATE, LIKE TWO HOURS LATE SOMETIMES, MY WIFE IS STILL TAKING HER CRAP. I AM GOING TO SHOW HER THIS WEBSITE AND WHAT OTHERS HAVE BEEN SAYING WHAT THEY CHARGE, SO THAT SHE CAN GET AN IDEA OF WHAT THE REAL WORLD ACTUALLY PAYS FOR HER KIND OF SERVICE. SHE ALSO WORKS FOR A NEWLY OPENED ADULT DAY CARE FOR ALZHEIMER PATIENTS AND THEY ONLY PAY THE STAFF $10 AN HOUR, WITH THE PROMISE OF HIGHER PAY ONCE THE CENTER IS ESTABLISHED AND THEY GET A GREATER CASH FLOW.

 

33% helpful
mamahelp answered...

I just wish there was more help from the government, I am a caregiver/friend of the family who cares for a 89 year young lady I call mama and that is what I think of her. I live in her house wih my husband. We have a room and we get groceries plus $200.00 a month. I care for her 24/7. She has severe alzheimers, she has severe ostheoparosis, diabetes, high blood pressure and she is incontinent (both). Family lives 2 hours away or more and only visit 1 or 2 time a month. They are in charge of her finances, bills, groceries and my pay. They say that uses up all her money from ssi, and there is no money left for more pay. I can't even get them to stay one day for me a break. I love her so much and feel like if I go I am abandoning my mama and I just cant do that. Anyone know of help in Texas?

 

Eureeka answered...

@mamahelp You should speak to the family about getting respite care. A lot of elderly people are eligible for this free of charge. I just went through a similar situation until my client passed a few weeks ago. I had found out that there were all these things he was eligible for that the family kept from me. There is a lot of support for caregivers, you should research what's available and bring it to their attention. Also, if that is all they are able to pay, she is definitely eligible for respite :)

 

 
Ask a question Ask a question | Add an answer Add an answer