Stroke and Depression

How to Deal With Depression After a Stroke

By , Caring.com senior editor
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A stroke can trigger depression

For most people, the word "stroke" brings to mind a constellation of problems, including paralysis and difficulty with speech. But if someone has recently had a stroke, you're probably well aware that the effects go well beyond the physical. The emotional aftermath can be just as overwhelming and far more difficult to sort out.

Although depression can strike anyone, those who've suffered a catastrophic illness may be more susceptible than other people. And when you throw a brain injury into the mix, the risk of developing a mood disorder becomes even greater. As many as half of stroke survivors will become depressed, according to James Castle, a neurologist at Stanford University.

Depression isn't just miserable, it may also make a stoke survivor more susceptible to pain and fatigue and may even delay his recovery.

  • In a study published in the journal Stroke, researchers reported that stroke survivors who were treated for depression demonstrated improved recovery in regular daily activities compared with those whose depression went untreated.
  • People who are depressed also tend to be less compliant with rehabilitation and more resistant to making lifestyle changes to prevent a second stroke.

Fortunately, depression can be treated. With the appropriate care, a patient will lead a happier life -- and life will be easier for you, too. Here are some practical things you can do if you think the person you're caring for is depressed after a stroke.