Paula Spencer Scott, Caring.com senior editor

Contributing editor Paula Spencer Scott is the author of Surviving Alzheimer's: Practical Tips and Soul-Saving Wisdom for Caregivers, and writes our Surviving Caregiving blog. She's written much of Caring's Alzheimer's and caregiving content, including Caring's Steps & Stages Alzheimer's resource and the FYI Daily and Self Caring blogs.

Scott has specialized in women's life-stage concerns (baby care, family care, self-care, elder care) from her first job as an editor at 50 Plus Magazine through stints as a Woman's Day columnist and coauthor of health books with doctors at Harvard, UCLA, Duke, and Arizona State. She's a 2011 Met Life Foundation Journalists in Aging fellow, awarded by the Gerontological Society of America and New American Media, and completed a National Press Foundation's Alzheimer's Disease 2012 fellowship.

In the late 2000s, she lost both her parents, in their 80s, to cancer; her father also had dementia and stroke. "In short order during that phase," she says, "I experienced just about everything that's on this site, from dealing with their illnesses to selling the family home and moving Dad, plus advance directives, end-of-life planning, hospice, death -- and stress."

Follow her on Twitter @PSpencerScott.

Recently Published on Caring.com

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  • What Senior Move Managers Do Senior move managers help plan and manage a move of any distance, such as from a longtime home to a communal living situation. They hire and s...

  • Quick summary The memory loss and other cognitive changes characteristic of Alzheimer's disease and most other forms of dementia can't be reversed. But there are some prov...

  • Dignity is one of those things we don't think much about until it’s gone. In the hospital, for instance: Ever hear the saying about hospitalizations, "Check your dignity a...

  • Why does it feel so good to stretch? Because it's a form of movement that both energizes and relaxes at the same time. Stretching requires deeper breathing, which sends oxy...

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  • Alzhiemer's Myth 1: "Mom can't have Alzheimer's -- she remembers all kinds of things." Alzheimer's disease affects newly learned information or recent memories first. Memo...

  • The decision to help an aging adult move out of a current home is a complex one -- both emotionally and practically. Above all, you want the person to be safe and well. How...

  • We all have good moods and bad moods. After all, the circumstances of our lives are always in flux. Sometimes, though, the timing, intensity, or trigger of a mood swing can...

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  • Untreated sleep apnea -- a breathing disorder in which abnormal pauses in breathing during sleep can cause someone to abruptly wake up -- is becoming more and more commonly...

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  • Preparing to have a loved one move into your home? Or interested in helping someone with early dementia remain independent for as long as possible, perhaps with outside hel...

  • So the Season has ended -- by which I mean caregivers' moment in the national spotlight. November was National Family Caregivers Month and National Alzheimer's Disease Awar...

  • It's a natural impulse to want to protect those who are frail or have dementia. We want to keep our loved ones as safe and well as possible. Unfortunately, when it comes to...

  • I've been lucky to talk to many amazing, wise caregivers and experts in caregiving over the years. These five quotes have stuck with me. The reason, I think, is that each m...

  • We all snap at the ones we love sometimes. It happens for a million different reasons -- or for what can seem like no reason at all. Actually, when a snap seems to come "o...

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  • Who is a caregiver today? A caregiver isn't a face in the crowd; a caregiver is the crowd. Him, her, you, me, spouses, adult children, old friends, siblings -- people of a...