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Respite Care in Assisted Living

Does anyone have experience with this?


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2 months ago

I learned very quickly that rehabilitation centers are predominantly nursing homes, as my first walk down the hall created a vision of one lifeless body after the other seeming to want me to understand their sadness and feelings of entrapment. Some could only talk to me with their eyes, but somehow their messages touched me. I could only wonder why age caused individuals to become emotions in crumbled useless bodies. I soon learned that the physically catatonic state was not as natural a process of aging as I had been taught that it was.
One of the aids of the rehabilitation center/nursing home felt the need to advise me upon my mother’s arrival that, “At a certain point, all older people fall into a totally dependent almost unconscious state. I don’t want you to be shocked when the same thing happens to your mother. Don’t worry, you brought her to the right place, she will be very well taken care of.” The aid continued by explaining that once the patient falls into the not really knowing what is going on state of mind; their job becomes much easier.
When seeking relief from the unwelcome reality speech being given by the aid of the rehabilitation center/nursing home, I became aware that my mother because of her age had been sent directly to the nursing home unit. As I looked into endless sets of crying eyes, I named the nursing home wing of the rehabilitation center/nursing home, the “Hall of the Hopelessly Aging.” Growing up, I remembered visiting nursing homes, so I was not shocked to see the slumped bodies sitting in wheelchairs. What I didn’t understand then, that I possibly know today is that the catatonic appearing human beings are often being assisted into becoming blobs of contentment. Are we ignoring the fact that our parents are possibly being robbed of their dignity, life’s savings, and safety while we are being conned into thinking that we are offering them a chance to live their golden years in peaceful safe havens? Could we be teaching that no one needs to care about anyone and that killing your family member and/or friend is revered if it helps you better your present position in your community? There is nothing wrong with profits being made from assisting the elderly, etc., but what happened to offering them at least some of their rights according to the US Constitution. Allowing a retired hard worker and possibly mentor the chance to live with dignity and safety could possibly offer higher profits with limitless potential. As you consider the profits gained by questionable rehabilitation centers/nursing homes, and assisted living institutions, think about where you are going to be when you need older age appropriate assistance. You could look forward to being punished for not wanting to eat bugs in your food. Or, you could joyously picture yourself being abused into sleeping in your waste after being given a laxative against your will because you are told that all old people get constipated.
Please, it is time to stop this almost legal elder abuse! We need to change the attitudes that abusing even those considered useless older people is worth working toward ending. We need to stand together in asking for a change in how vaguely the laws for the rights of the elderly are written and enforced. If we show that respect creates advantages for all, we will prove that violence and abuse are not the answers to success.

PeachesRight said...

4 months ago

What about respite care for the caregiver that needs a break?

PeachesRight said...

4 months ago

7 months ago

My family tried out Respite Care in Assisted Living for my grandmother after she was discharged from the hospital. She had colon cancer and was trying to recover from some treatments, but we were worried about bringing her directly home, where she would have little supervision. She does not drive and is cared for by family members when they have the time, so we looked into Respite Care in Assisted Living as a viable solution. She stayed in a senior housing community for two weeks and was cared for by the lovely community staff as she recovered and got used to eating again. The caregivers at the community were even able to offer mealtime support by catering to her unique dietary needs, and they provided transportation when she needed to check in at her doctor's office. At the end of the two weeks, we were able to bring her home and were better equipped to care for her needs. She has been recovering quickly ever since and we are so happy we used Respite Care as a transition between the hospital and home. I encourage others to try this out if they're worried about a loved one who's recovering from treatments/surgery.