What are Medicare Part A and Medicare Part B premiums, deductibles, and coinsurance amounts in 2010?

2 answers | Last updated: Nov 10, 2016
A fellow caregiver asked...

What are Medicare Part A and Medicare Part B premiums, deductibles, and coinsurance amounts in 2010?


Expert Answers

Medicare premiums, deductibles, and coinsurance amounts change each year for Medicare Part A and Medicare Part B. (For people who receive their Medicare hospital and medical coverage through a Medicare Part C Medicare Advantage managed care plan, premiums, deductibles, and co-payments are determined by the plan itself, not by Medicare.)

Here are the Medicare Part A and Medicare Part B figures for 2010:

Medicare Part A

  • Medicare Part A monthly premium. Most people do not pay any Medicare Part A premium. However, people who qualify for Medicare Part A with only 30 to 39 quarters of Medicare-covered employment must pay a monthly premium of $254. For people who qualify with less than 30 quarters of Medicare-covered employment, the monthly Medicare Part A premium is $461.
  • Medicare Part A deductible. For each inpatient hospital stay within any one benefit period, the patient must pay a Medicare Part A deductible of $1,100.
  • Medicare Part A hospital coinsurance. For the first 60 days of a hospital inpatient stay, the patient pays no daily coinsurance under Medicare Part A. For days 61 through 90 of hospitalization during any one benefit period, the patient is personally responsible for $275 per day. For days 91 through 150 of hospitalization, the patient is personally responsible for $550 per day. (These daily coinsurance amounts might be covered by a Medigap supplemental insurance policy, a Medicare Part C Medicare Advantage managed care plan, or employment-related private health insurance.
  • Medicare Part A skilled nursing facility coinsurance. For the first 20 days of a Medicare-covered stay in a skilled nursing or rehabilitation facility, the patient pays no daily coinsurance amount. For days 21 through 100, the patient must pay a daily coinsurance amount of $137.50.

Medicare Part B

  • Medicare Part B premium. Most people pay a monthly Medicare Part B premium of $96.40. People who first enroll in Medicare Part B in 2010, and those who are not yet collecting Social Security benefits, will pay $110.50. People with a yearly income of more than $85,000 ($170,000 for a couple) pay a higher monthly Medicare Part B premium, as follows:
  • People with yearly income over $85,000 ($170,000 for a couple) but less than $107,000/$214,000 (single/couple) pay a monthly premium of $154.70 per person.
  • People with income over $107,000/$214,000 (single/couple) and up to $160,000/$320,000 (single/couple) pay a monthly premium of $221 per person.
  • People with income over $160,000/$320,000 and up to $214,000/$428,000 (single/couple) pay a monthly premium of $287.30 per person.
  • People with income over $214,000/$428,000 (single/couple) pay a monthly premium of $353.60 per person.
  • Medicare Part B yearly deductible. Everyone with Medicare Part B must pay a yearly deductible of $155 before Medicare starts paying anything.
  • Medicare Part B coinsurance amounts. For most medical services, supplies, and equipment covered by Medicare Part B, the patient is responsible for 20 percent of the amount Medicare approves. If the provider of the service does not accept "assignment" of the Medicare-approved amount, the patient may also be responsible for amounts charged by the provider above the Medicare-approved amount.

 


Community Answers

A fellow caregiver answered...

But I have a health payment deducted from my social security check. I thought this was to pay for Medicare Part A. Isn't it? Then, I also pay for a supplemental insurance for Medicare Part B, the $96.40 which will become $104.+ in 2011, and a supplemental insurance for prescription drugs under Medicare Part D. I'm a lot for Medicare coverage. Is this the way it is for everyone?