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Where can I get mastectomy support?

3 answers | Last updated: Aug 29, 2015
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An anonymous caregiver asked...

I had Breast Cancer. After my masectomy, chemo, and radiation, I now feel ashamed of my one breast and I cry a lot. My oncologist has me on medications but nothing seems to help. I am not in a relationship because I don't want anyone to see me. Are there any support groups in the Lithonia Ga area for women like me who are or has gone through this and they support themselves as we travel down this long lifetime road?

 

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Doctor Logan answered...

As an Oncologist, I have found that women with breast cancer that undergo treatment then have a mastectomy are left to bear the less then happy loss and embarrasment. Consult a counselor for emotional assistance and consider an implant. Many women can effect a solved loss as the result of surgical processes. I recommend the saline filled due to the possibiity of poisoning by silicone. Some surgeons are useful at filling the breast with tissue from inside the upper-abdominal cavity that can be treated to assure non-regection. Actual use of implants is the most viable and esiest to effect without side- affects. Acceptance is crucial to effecting emotional and physical healing. Contact a support group in atlanta and discover the implant specialists that are in the area. Consult and get several opinions. The newest research is geared toward growing new masts from seed tissue and t-cells that dis-separate to form effective masts. Dr.Logan

 

candy22 answered...

I also had a mastectomy and only have one breast. I am not going to get a breast implant because I don't want the complications that go with it. I bought a breast form for a little over $300 at Nordstrom. It's made of silicone and you insert it into a pocket that is sewn into a bra. Nordstrom has the special bras with the pocket but they will also sew this pocket/s into any of their bras. When I found the right bra and breast form I found that I could wear ALL of my clothing, even the tighter tops without anyone knowing that I only have one real breast.

As for dating--I totally understand your embarrassment. But maybe it's a good test to find a guy that is going to stick by you through thick and thin. If a guy can't handle it--do you really want this guy in the long run? At least he still can see your one lovely breast. Embrace the fact that you still have one breast and you are alive and well.

I live with this problem of not accepting myself because of the loss of my breast. I know it isn't easy, but you have to remember how lucky you are that the cancer is gone. Consider the fact that you could have lost a part of your body that was more functional--like an arm or a leg or even a hand. Your breast didn't serve a super important purpose. Millions of women live with mastectomies and have the breast forms--not the implant--and live good happy useful lives.

I wish you all the luck in the world. Just try to be strong and positive whenever you can.