What is the average life expectancy for a heart disease patient after a bypass surgery?

5 answers | Last updated: Aug 21, 2017
Badbonehealing asked...

After a "typical" bypass - with the person being in reasonable physical condition otherwise, is there an "average" life expectancy?  I am asking for a very good friend that I am concerned about.


Expert Answers

James Frank is Assistant Professor of Medicine and Director of the Medical Intensive Care Unit at the V.A. Medical Center in San Francisco.

Unfortunately, it's not possible to answer this question over the internet. Your friend's life expectancy depends on many different factors, including what type of bypass surgery she had and how old she was when she had the bypass. Depending on the type of bypass surgery, the grafts can stay open for many years, which may be longer than your friend would live normally. So for some people, bypass surgery might be a cure. Your friend's doctor will be able to discuss her prognosis with her.


Community Answers

Conan2007 answered...

I had "quintuple by-pass surgery on 3-2-05--I was 57 at the time and now I am 68--in my case, I try my best to eat smart (no fried foods), and I walk 30 minutes a day--I had one artery that was 90% blocked--the other 4 arteries were 50-60%--I am VERY lucky so far--I also pray every day for another day.


Louise krekic answered...

To conan2007, much more physical activity than 30 min walking is needed. Fried food have little to do with heart disease, unless that is all you eat. Heart disease is mostly genetic and the damage od arteries is from insulin resistance and childhood infections that caused high fevers. Insuline resistance screws up our metabolism and infections damage the lining of the heart and blood vessels. Once the lining becomes raspy, the plaque deposits on them much easier. Check the new research on heart disease.


Atait4 answered...

Short answer.... there isn't one. Perhaps this may help shed some light...

Quintuple bypass at 36 ---- 24 years ago this fall. Made many aggressive changes. With the help of a very talented medical community .... changed the factors I could and accepted those I could not. Changes included, stopped smoking, lost 50#, very aggressive exercise.... ran several marathons, balanced diet, stress control and eliminating caustic components of my life. Had an angiogram 2 years ago. Native vessels are all gone.....BUT...4 of the 5 grafts are are in excellent condition with some collateral / back feeding. Not certain how many years I have left, but I am not stopping to look back! (Rumor has it that you can now garft to grafts ..... and how about 3D printed hearts..... whats not to look forward to ..... fight on on ... life is more that worth it!!)

Side note.....that medical community bunch... Marsha - yep I do remember that first walk, Laurie, Theresa, Steph, Tara, Josh, Liz Anne and a whole bunch more. Couple of Docs also... Doc. Durr, Doc. Nord, Doc. Ferrier, Doc. Vaughn-Whitley. Special note regarding Dr. Wojewski .... performed my bypasses.... it is my understanding that his handy work carries a notable history of longevity. Good news for those with the good fortune to experience his "handy work"! May he rest in peace and god bless!!


Delboy answered...

Triple BY-Pass in 1982 (35 yrs ago) in Adelaide ,South Australia and still going fit and well at 81, walk a couple of Km every day and enjoy a happy and relaxed life style. Don't know the answer to a long life after By -Pass, but keeping happy and keeping fit seems to have been the remedy for me! Derek Bee,