What kind of living arrangements are available for those under 65, but disabled, without a lot of money?

12 answers | Last updated: Nov 29, 2016
Peanut081981 asked...

I have my inlaws living with my husband and I, and we are trying to get them there own place. They are both disabled, unable to work, and under the age of 65. The only income they have is disability income. What type of living is available for those people like us who can't pay $35,000 a month?


Expert Answers

Nan Hayes is founder of MoveSeniors.com, the national resource network of Certified Relocation and Transition Specialists for seniors, and President of RightSized Living, a senior home transition service in Illinois.

If you have not done so, contact your local resources for information on seniors with disabilities. Your local Area Agency on Aging and your Aging and Disability Resource Centers can provide information about regional housing and assistance programs.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) supports the Section 202 Supportive Housing for the Elderly Program. The program produces about 6,000 units each year. Qualifications include at least one resident over the age of 62, with income below 50% of their area median income. The average income is around $10,000. Section 202 homes often have safety features and are located near support services.

While critics complain of limited availability, much will depend on the area in which you live. Other federally funded programs, such as Section 8, also support older persons. For more information, go to http://www.hud.gov/ and follow your state links.


Community Answers

A fellow caregiver answered...

apparently not if you're as young as i am.  i am 33 with multiple sclerosis and bipolar disorder.  these are both debilitating diseases that robbed me of any future.  you know, caregivers in my circle are really ticked that sites like this don't address the ongoing needs of THEIR situations since they will be caring for me for a much longer time.  hud only cares about you when you have children, and i will need some form of assisted living soon.  the average waiting list here is 5 years.  count 'em. FIVE !  i never got the chance to save money from work, attend college, or the like.....it's a damn shame that the needs of my demographic are never addressed...let alone the needs of my poor, tired, and burned - out caregivers who've devoted their unconditional love and support to me..........


Jplambert86 answered...

I'm in the same boat as the 33 year old with MS. I'm ten years younger with a spinal cord injury but living with my mother is not working for me at all. Before I was injured, I did not need medical insurance which has me kind trapped in a vice with doctor and medication coverage without allowing me to work and make any money. I'm working on going back to school but finding housing is impossible as far as i'm concerned. especially having been moved out before my injury and then moving back in afterwords due to the demands of the job i had. what about people under 60. younger people with medicaid/ or medicare.. i'll be forced to switch from medicaid to medicare in less than a year but have no idea what to expect and feel as if the government resources are kept secret, to make it difficult to utulize resources. my medications would cost me thousands a month with out medicaid.


A fellow caregiver answered...

There really isn't anything out there for people like you. I know many in your same position. Parents having to take care of them do to an injury. No insurance. No way out. Our president's new health care was to help people like you and other's however, at what cost. Plus, how much help? The parts I have heard of so, far are of little if any help to you. Now they are talking about cutting medicare, perhaps even medicaid. Now where will you be if that happens? I don't have an answer for you though I wish I did. I know you are hurting. I know you are angry. I feel your pain. I pray you will find your help. If you do I hope you will come back and share it with other's.

This is the only way we can help each other. If I find out anything and I will do research on it. I will come back and let you know. Till then God Bless you and keep you safe.


Intelligent viewer answered...

MS patients should know that there is a procedure that can be done to clear out the jugular veins in the neck and azygos vein if needed. This is called CCSVI. My husband had this done in October 2010. It didn't last BUT, it did work. He was walking without a walker or cane. His knee and ankle were able to bend at will. He plans to have the procedure repeated. There are places in California, New York and Georgia that I know of. Works best on Secondary Progressive. It appears that MS may be caused by a circulatory problem that backs up, dropping iron, stretching the vessel causing microleaks. Microleaks cause neurological problems...similar to a stroke. Correct the blockage so the blood can flow properly, iron doesn't build up, vessel doesn't stretch, body can heal. Good results were seen within 24 hours!


Slerriuqs answered...

@intelligentviewer, I know you're most likely trying to be helpful, but your information is incorrect at best and dangerous at worst. Decades of research have gone into this disease and they're nowhere near finding the cause - but yours is the first time in over 29 years I've heard of this. Please keep medical "advice" to yourself unless you're a doctor or researcher. The question was about getting living assistance anyway. There IS NO CURE for MS (yet). You remind me of those conspiracy folks in the 70s who touted Laetrile as the "cure" for cancer the govt and drug companies were keeping from us. So where is it now, eh? Haven't heard if it since then. I'm glad your husband found some relief, but again, please refrain from making definitive statements about the cause and cure for MS.


Intelligent viewer answered...

Sorry to have ruffled your feathers about the CCSVI information, but I AM a researcher and the CCSVI procedure is only new in the USA. It has been done for at least 10 years in Italy. I did not say it was a cure. I said it was a procedure. I also said it didn't last and needed to be repeated, but it does, in many, not all cases, help the patient. I understand that some people would rather not do anything but the standard treatment and that is their choice, but I mentioned this as an alternative treatment for those who have tried the standard and found it only hastens the disease process. In research, we look for things other than the status quo....or it fails to be research and only becomes repeat. When there is any relief for something from out of the ordinary treatment, it tells us another piece of the puzzle. People have a right to know what is available and make their own decisions. Those who do not wish to keep up with current research are free to make that decision as well. As far as looking for help for those under 65, that was answered. Perhaps you can read more carefully before you decide information is giving definitive statements about the cause and cure for any disease process, so you are not so disappointed to learn that it is stickly information on current research which MAY lead to more answers. Try not to be so hostile and closeminded.


Bc41129 answered...

I do agree. I for one am always looking for new research. Even if it is not available yet. It does give us hope that one day maybe they will have something to help us. This was given as information not as a cure like they said. They did mention it did have to be repeated because, it did not work the first time. Sure I know what you mean about all those fake cures. I hear about them too. However, there are alot of new research out there and I do like hearing about them. We all need hope. Something to cling to. Weather it is a cure or hope for a place to live. A new program to help us live our life better. I thought this was what this place was all about.

Let us speak and give this hope and those who read keep an open mind. Speak to your local reps. and doctors. Ask about what you read here. Find out search out. Learn! You never know when that one tip just might be the right answer for YOU!


Bc41129 answered...

I was just thinking what about trying to find someone like you that might be able to move in with you into an apartment. Share the expenses. Perpaps two or three of you sharing the expenses. Atleast you could find someone around the same age. Maybe disabled but, not in the same way you are. Someone you can help and someone that can help you till other arrangements could be made. You might talk with a councelor or doctor to see about arrangements or maybe a social worker. They might be able to hep you find someone like you that would be willing to do this. Place an ad in local paper and do some screening and back ground checking on them. It sure could not hurt to try.


Sruasonid answered...

I didn't think that poster was either "hostile or closeminded." He merely stated (correctly so, IMHO), that this thread was answering a question about LIVING ARRANGEMENTS for disabled folks under 65 without a lot of money. Frankly, I thought your posts were arrogant (MS PATIENTS SHOULD KNOW"), and your second one downright rude. Mr S was polite, even saying "please" twice, and only stating an opinion and/or his feelings about the Laetrile thing. He never called you names (as you did him), nor did he say he wasn't interested in trying new therapies or even hearing about them. And as for myself, finances around living arrangements is a serious topic for me too, so I also felt your post was out if place. Ok, you're a researcher. Fine. If this treatment has been used for 10 years in Italy, I'd think it would at least have been discusses in the US in all that time. Your placement gas me somewhat skeptical myself, now I think of it. And as for helping each other, say, that's what I'm doing. Mr. S was unfairly attacked and I'm here to say it. Let's stay on topic and avoid the name calling and judgments, ok? Please?


A fellow caregiver answered...

I am 50 with MS. Fortunately I had enough years as high income earner to qualify for a decent SSDI benefit. As well, I am married and my kids were grown and on their own before the disability became significant. First, there is a family caregiver benefit, do a search on this site, that can provide a stipend for a family member. A few hundred, but weaving an assortment of benefits together is the only way for the young disabled to get by. An accessible apartment, shared by 2 or more, with DIFFERENT disabilities and abilities seems to be a better blend. Someone might not be able to drive, but be able to do light housework etc. Combining modest resources and sharing expenses, is easier on us psychologically than living with a parent. Disabled or not, the desire for independence is part of the human spirit. Also call *2 from a local landline. It will get you in ocntact with the community resources coordinator. they can send a volunteer beenfit coordinator out to help get you qualifies for every available program. Enlist someone with strong somputer skills and apply for every grant you can find. Also, though humbling, the local churches can be a bounty of physical, spiritual and financial assistance. You need to let people know your needs. You are not alone. And after you learn the resources in your area, you will be able to help someone else. Every good wish, Jen Secondary Progressive MS and blind (written with dragon dictation) and my little computer hooked up to a big OLD monitor.


Imbunky2 answered...

Subsidized Housing for Disabled. Call your County Department of Social Services or Federal Housing and Urban Development. (My answer was much longer, but I couldn't remember my user name. LOL)