Kathryn Pears, MPPM, Geriatric Care Manager


Kathryn Pears is a dementia expert with over 30 years personal and professional experience. She has a Masters degree in Public Policy and Management and an Executive Certificate in Health are Policy from the Muskie School of Public Service at the University of Southern Maine. Following a 15 year career with the Alzheimer’s Association, Maine Chapter she started her own company, Dementia Care Strategies. Dementia Care Strategies trains and consults with families, health and long term care professionals and facilities, and aging and disability community agencies on the non-pharmacologic management of the challenging behaviors that occur with dementia. Ms. Pears has worked with numerous aging and disability-related state and national organizations presenting workshops on non-pharmacologic management of the challenging behaviors that occur with dementia. She is also a Master Trainer for the evidence-based Savvy Caregiver Program and was the Lead Trainer for the State of Maine’s Savvy Caregiver Program. Kathryn is a member of the National Task Group on Intellectual Disabilities and Dementia’s (NTG’s) Steering Committee and co-chairs their Group T working group that has developed a national model curriculum on dementia-capable care for adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities who are at risk for or have been diagnosed with dementia. A Lead Trainer for the model curriculum, she travels the country conducting workshops on behalf of the NTG. She is also a consultant in non-pharmacologic interventions for behavioral symptoms of dementia and clinic coordinator for the American Academy of Developmental Medicine and Dentistry’s (AADMD) new Project ECHO® ID and Dementia telehealth project that provides specialist consultation on ID and dementia to community providers in rural and underserved areas.

Why I Care

"Having cared for my father, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease at the age of 58, I understand the challenges families face on a daily basis, especially when it comes to behavioral challenges. My passion is helping family and professional caregivers understand and appreciate why individuals with dementia do the things they do. My mantra is, 'Behavior is communication.' Once a caregiver understands that most behaviors are triggered by something and have meaning, they can develop a tool kit of strategies and interventions. This improves not only the quality of life for the person living with dementia but their own quality of life as well."

Links

For more information about Dementia Care Strategies, its trainings and workshops, and how to contact the company directly, visit its website at www.dementiacarestrategies.com. You can also follow Kathryn Pears on Linkedin at http://www.linkedin.com/pub/kathryn-pears.


Recently Published on Caring.com

I'm concerned about wandering. Is there an ID bracelet that would be next to impossible for her to remove? — Aug 30, 2015
Wandering is a very serious issue so I'm glad you are reaching out for help. You have a couple of options. The Alzheimer's Association offers Medic Alert + Safe Return (...
Can tremors be treated or minimized? — Dec 16, 2011
Maria: You ask if tremors can be treated or minimized. Not being able to eat without dropping his food must be very frustrating and discouraging for your father. Tremors...
Why wouldn't a neurologist diagnose dementia or Alzheimer's? — Nov 16, 2011
I always advise people to get a second opinion so this is an option you might want to look into. Caring.com also has a Memory Clinic locator feature that will help you fin...
How can we get my mom with dementia to sleep? — Nov 08, 2011
Your poor father must be totally exhausted. This is a very common problem in dementia and are related to the neurodegenerative process that is occurring in her brain. It ...
What's the Best Way to Handle My Mother's Accusations That My Father Is Having an Affair, When He's Been Faithful to Her for the Forty Years They've Been Married? — Aug 15, 2011
1. Never argue. Arguing with a person with dementia is always fruitless and will only result in increasing everyone's stress. 2. Rule out any medical issues. Any sudden ch...
What's the Best Way to Handle Someone With Alzheimer's Who Gets Angry and Violent? — Aug 15, 2011
Behavior in general is almost never random. It is how the person with Alzheimer's communicates when they are unable to verbalize their needs or concerns. Anger and agitatio...
What are some fresh ideas I can use to keep my mother with Alzheimer's occupied? — Aug 11, 2011
You represent a sense of security to your mom and when you are not around she becomes confused and gets anxious. Caring for someone at home is very demanding and it is frus...