What is a Therapeutic Fib?


Sometimes referred to as “redirecting,” a therapeutic fib is a technique sometimes used to help communicate with someone who has dementia. Chief Caring Expert Dayna Steele elaborates on this tactic, and how it worked for her family.


7 months ago, said...

Something I am noticing as a caregiver to my brother diagnosed 5 years ago with Alzheimer's and worth sharing. As this terrible disease progresses I am having to "fib" a lot less, it appears that I am noticing more of a compliant, almost defeated attitude. I still receive resistance on the must do requests, ex, "Let's take your shoes off for bed," he's agitated but doesn't ask why just doing it. Yes, I was told as the disease progresses the caregiving may get easier with some tasks, is this is what is happening? I was also told, with me, the agitation will probably always be evident, that I see happening. I am noticing a lot of negativity as well it seems, tired more, so, I am encouraging rest. I have cut back on a 5 daycare program to 4, letting him watch movies, catnap all day, sometimes anyone needs to lay like lettuce. Progressing and changes are hard to watch, the beginning stage was the hardest is true, can't believe I hung in there with "our" journey but I now realize he was trying so hard to hang onto his old normal and self, sad to watch. Caregiving can be doom and gloom, no wonder many givers feel depressed, depleted. God Bless All


7 months ago, said...

My father was convinced that his wife had Alzheimer's and because no one knew she would not receive the help she needed after he passed. It caused a lot of agitation and ruination, and many sleepless nights. I finally convinced his doctor to "go along", and at his next visit, they discussed her care plan. Dad slept through the night and didn't worry again. With Alzheimer's, it is their reality we have to live in to meet their needs.


7 months ago, said...

Such a good suggestion, as my brother's doctor said 5 years ago, "Keep it easy for you." I do remember in his beginning stage, it wasn't working, just seemed to bring out more of the agitation and paranoia in him. He would call me on the fibs, accuse me of lying, I would attempt reasoning, forgetting that was useless with him, would hold firm with the fib but so much drama and work, and let's not forget the guilt we go thru! I've learned it's a must these days to keep him safe and as healthy as I can; getting him in the backseat, out of clothes, showering, and yes, I still hear "No not happening." He's in denial since day 1, and his old nasty traits are alive and kicking most of the time. Anyone other than me to help has to be knowledgeable with the disease and his personality, so, always tough finding the right fit. Each day/moment and person are different with this terrible disease, it's life changing for the afflicted and the caregiver, no book or seminar has the answer. "Fasten your seatbelt," words spoke were honest. God Bless Caregivers