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about 4 years, said...

The article mentions a study with expected completion in 2009 as if 2009 was still in the future. Would be good to update the article with study results. Thanks for mentioning catches associated with the recommendations.


about 4 years, said...

My wife has been diagnosed with early stage dementia and on Aricept. I don't know that it is doing any good. She has become more withdrawn, and not socialising any more. She is not reading much these days. She always was an avid reader. So the tips in the article have been helpful for me.


about 4 years, said...

While I know that in my case, sleep apnea (undiagnosed for probably 20 years) was causing trouble with high blood pressure, rapid resting heart rate, and possibly thyroid related problems, I'm unsure that it's linked to AD. Besides - my father is 92 years old, the pulmonologist mentioned sleep apnea with my Dad once about 2 years ago, and I asked him how he suggested I get him to comply with the CPAP, when he won't wear his oxygen. That ended that discussion.


about 4 years, said...

I do not believe there is a way to slow the progression of the disease. However, I do believe understanding the best coping mechanisms for behaviors attributable to Alziheimer's does promote a better quality of life for the patient and his/her caregiver, especially a spouse.


about 4 years, said...

"how to slow the progression" is not informative in this article. The article just tells me how to live with it and make it more manageable for the person with dementia. That I already know.


over 4 years, said...

A recent report from the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) revealed evidence from two studies that Sleep Apnea is a cause of the neurodegenerative dementias including Alzheimer's Disease. Patients who were treated with CPAP showed improvement. For details : www.neurotodayonline.com and go to "Obstructive Sleep Apnea Associated with Dementia Risk."


about 5 years, said...

what is your source for stating that the drugs mentioned in your article slow the progression of the disease? Many people are arguing that said drugs to not slow progression while other researchers state they can/do slow progression, hence my question as to your source. I started my mom on namenda and exelon patch at the time of diagnosis because there was hope the medications would slow the progression. Mom has not declined since she started the drugs and was diagnosed which was ;07. thank you


about 5 years, said...

is in the article to long on Alzheimer's. My Dad pssted away this past 8/24/2012. In our home . My husbsnd snd I took care of him for 3 1/2 years. I have to say it was difficult, but one of the most rewarding times of our lifes.my dad had Lewy Bodies dementia and Parkinson's disease. we tried all kinds of things to get his memory to hold on a little longer, but was never interested in anything we tried,so we were trying new things still no interest, so we would go back and try things that we had already tried. still no interest. Louie bodies dementia is one of the worst. forms of Alzheimer's. there is.we were told by so many family members to put him in a nursing home. We could not do that.I just hope they find a cure for all the patience to come.because to watch my father, to go from this light hearted happy man smart. To what he became. I am just so glad he's out of his misery. I pray for New Hope for all the people still suffering.I just wanted to write and say what a blessing it was to have my father with me and my wonderful husband that help so much. Not many husbands would take the time to help their wife out and love their father in law like they're own father.I am truly am truly blessed.what is 1 of the most memorable experiences we will have her off had I love my dad with all my heart it wasn't always like that. But today I can truly say he's a wonderful man and I wouldn't have changed a thing about him. Except for him getting this awful diseasemay God bless you dad you are with mom nowand I truly love you both with all my heart and soul and for what we went through with dad things will never be the same in my life what an amazing experience thank you God for giving us the chance to take care of my father.


about 5 years, said...

Present other ways to slow the progression, especially early stages. My husband has no interest in the ways suggested in this article.


about 5 years, said...

Explanation of what the two drugs my husband takes do.


about 5 years, said...

The info on a recommended diet and medications.


almost 6 years, said...

What a positive blog! It can give hope to many caregivers. http://www.lovemyoldfolks.com/when-to-intervene/ "Ž


almost 6 years, said...

Nice to see simple steps outlined. Printable to share with family


over 6 years, said...

very interesting article. unfortunately i am observing most of the symptoms. i have discovered routine and organization is a very important key to managing symptoms. also true about the caregiver taking time to care for self.


over 6 years, said...

Made me realize how important it is to try to keep the person busy with worthwhile activities that they enjoy.


over 6 years, said...

There is no way I believe that what a person who already has Alzheimer's eats - or what supplements she takes - have any effect on the course of the disease. Gingko is not a proven therapy for anyone; the tested pharmacological drugs help some people show fewer syumptoms for a little longer, but do not halt or delay the disease's progress, not from anything I have read. The time when a healthy diet would have impact on this disease in when people are younger - probably what we eat as children has a more significan impact on the growth - and ultimate resiliency - of the brain than anything that can be done in later decades. While the article gives good suggestions for helping people to best use what they've ( or their relatives have) got - and to reduce unnecessary stress - again - it is best to increase the brain's resources by engaging in many different activities when younger - and to keep up interests - not necessarily because they absolutely prevent AD, but because they give you more to work with as you age. There is a major genetic compoment in all this - but it also looks as if some of the same threats to our health that contribute to heart disease and some cancers - obesity, high blood pressure, poor diet, lack of exercise - also may set up some people for Alzheimer's or other dementias. I am just affraid that people may think that if they make all the recommended changes, the individual with Alzheimer's symptoms will be "normal" ... but this simply will not happen. Expectations that are too high lead to frustration for all involved.


over 6 years, said...

"Ooh, let's stretch out an article over five pages to get more clicks." FAIL! Because I leave petty little websites that resort to creepy click-throughs, Asta la Vista Beyotches!


over 6 years, said...

It was very informative, with a lot of information given. I learned many things I had not heard before.


almost 7 years, said...

yes I am going to check into the electronic reminders


almost 7 years, said...

yes


almost 7 years, said...

My mom was dx w/ "Dementia of the Alzheimers Type" in Jan of 2008. Honestly her symptoms began in May of 2005 while taking care of my dying dad who passed Dec 2005. The assisted living facility she is in now does not take Medicaid and we are all out of money except for her house, which my son (9) and I are currently living in. Since we cannot pay the assisted living they are expecting me to move her out end of the month. 10 days. I guess I'll just bring her home and take care of her here. (I have a very flexible part-time job). We did everything this article recommends and she remains on Namenda and Excelon patch entering or having entered Stage 3. She seems finally adjusted to the assisted living and I haven't found any openings in places that take Medicaid close to home. I am terrified of the effects her demise will have on my 9 yr old son, who is very self centered and unempathic. (He wants his old grandma back that knows who he is). I am confident my husband will use the same excuse for his 2007-08 business venture failures to take my son away from me; he says" I gave up my family to take care of my mom." He has 5 bros and sisters, I have 1. His mom passed in a nursing home after major complications from heart surgery in Dec. 2008, and his dad already remarried. Am I asking too much of my son and husband to stick with me until the end? I cannot apply for Medicaid until I get the last 2 years taxes done. I haven't even had time to take the christmas tree down. I worry her demise will be hastened by coming home and having only me to depend on again. She is not a wanderer as she has RA and is in pain when trying to walk w/her walker. We have no wheelchair yet. I know I can get PT in here couple times a week and Medicare should pay for some home health aide help, yes? we are in Ohio. There is more to the story as she is newly diabetic as an overdose of prednisolone over 2 mos. caused her to bleed out Nov 2009 at home and she has been from ICU to skilled nursing and back to assisted living since then. She had no history of peptic ulcers. I truly believe the ulcer must have been adjacent to her pancreas as she had never had any symptoms of type II or sugar probs before this 4 month course of prednisones. Thru it all she never complained once and was pleasant and compliant even if confused and now definitely in begining of Stage 3. She is constantly worried what her father is going to do or say when he finds out she is sick and seeing all these doctors! She thinks I'm her mom or twin sister alot, but i don't care. She is often smiling and so happy to see me. I am terrified of handling Stage 3 alone.


almost 7 years, said...

"Alzheimer's" is the popular generic for all kinds of dementia. However, there are other causes of senility/dementia besides Alzheimer's, and they should not be ignored.


almost 7 years, said...

Hi obbyscuba, Thank you for your question. If you'd like, you can post your question in our Ask & Answer section, here: ( http://www.caring.com/ask ). I hope that helps. Take care -- Emily | Community Manager


almost 7 years, said...

What is wrong with rising later and going to bed later? If that is their current pattern it seems better to go with the flow.


about 7 years, said...

Rereading the stream of comments it seemed to me and still seems to me that many of us are seeking information on anything that may help us. For me, one of the most helpful things has been the direct experience of others who are caring for an Alzheimer's affected spouse, sometimes referred to as your life partner. My life partner is slipping away. I don't believe there are drug cures for Alzheimer's. It is fair to ask then why I give him Aricept and Namenda. It's not because I am expecting a cure. It is to delay the onset of total cognitive collapse. I don't know if it's helped or not. The things other spouses communicate to me are small things that facilitate my efforts and help me to feel less alone. Feeding tips that help keep the affected spouse eating. Sleeping tips that help keep him sleeping at night rather than in the daytime and roaming at night. Pats on the head from others who have been there. Someone asked why it is mostly females that are considered in these comments. There are a some reasons I can think of: Spouses more often take care of each other. Since women often live longer, they get their Alzheimer's after their spouses have died. Also, in our culture, husbands are often older than their wives. While I see comments from many daughters who take care of their mothers, it also is not uncommon that mom is "placed" in a wonderful facility with lots of activities and stimulation. These comments that we write are an attempt to be helpful. Sometimes a little background puts that help in context so that it is easier to relate to a readers personal situation. We, as readers, are sometimes a little cranky if our questions aren't answered the way we would like them to be. We aren't getting enough sleep and we are exhausted from worry.


about 7 years, said...

It's not an especially long article, but I notice that a good bit of the information ti from 2009, we are now in 2011. To comment on the coconut oil and coconut milk, I would not give that to anyone with cholesterol issues. It's delicious and satisfying but the fact is that Thailand where they use it most has the highest heart attack and stroke rate in Asia. Higher even than India where butter is used for cooking. Indians go in for more whole grains, and that helps deal with all that butter. Olive oil is probably the best oil over all for health and so is sunflower oil. It's pretty hard to make proper curry using either though. So I would get unsalted butter and make ghee or purchase it in a good Indian or Pakistani grocery.


about 7 years, said...

gunfighter-- I tried coconut oil on the advice of a nutritionist that I trusted. this was based on one informal "study" with a man who developed dementia relatively early in life. his progress showed really nice improvement when given 2 tablespoons of coconut oil every day. I tried it with my father... he actually looked worse over time. however,after a year of getting his cholesterol down below 150 and using other vitamins and strategies to build up his functioning, I have since added the use of coconut milk to my cooking (such as making Thai or curry recipes), and occasionally sauteeing with coconut oil instead of butter, oil or other, and his cholesterol has shown no ill effects (the coconut oil has a shorter chain and therefore is broken down differently in the system, despite it being listed as high in saturated fats). all I can say is try it for a few weeks, and if there is no sign of improvement, back off.


about 7 years, said...

this is a very good overview of what could and should be done. we have some very good days here, use most of the herbs and vitamins related to his medical conditions, as he has had side effects from every known medication for dementia except aricept. Most important was finding a neurologist who is a D.O. and actually is up on what vitamins and herbs work. Just as with any chronic illness, your trust in the doctor is as important or moreso in the treatment as what he prescribes. There are some new concoctions out there that also act in the same way as Aricept, so be careful what you mix. I have read and been told to be careful about Vitamin E as it is also a blood thinner of sorts and can cause problems if they are also on medication of the same.


about 7 years, said...

Can someone tell me why is it, when we tell the physicians that we do not want them on any medications (other than vitamins and baby aspirin), they go behind your back and do it anyway? We noticed my mom was very spaced out the last 2-3 visits but weren't sure why. We just got a bill from the pharmacy for Namenda and Aricept, which we did not authorize. Home Health got doctor to prescribe anyway.


about 7 years, said...

Especially for Grannylove2 and sarahnel. My husband and I are in our mid 70s. I care for him at home. He is not entirely bed bound but he spends nearly all of his time in a horizontal position either in bed or on the couch. He is incontinent and often needs to be fed. He has almost no interest in anything and sometimes becomes unreasonably fearful and if we are on a doctor's visit, he may place himself on the floor and refuse to move. I write to serveral people who are in "my stage group". One of them, Sallie, has a bed bound husband. All of these guys are in stage 3. We derive considerable help and comfort from each other and a marked reduction in the feelings of isolation that occurs in caregivers (especially for this deaf one who doesn't function in groups). When he was diagnosed around 2006, the neurologist in charge of the study spoke to me at length and told me that while he would recommend Aricept and (later) Namenda, in fact, nothing has been proved to work. And many of these ideas relating to diet, exercise, mental stimulation and antioxidants have not been shown to reduce the onset of Alzheimer's at all. I am a physician (as it happens), I have read some of these articles and this is the sad truth. There are new medicines being developed based on more recent research on the changes involved with Alzheimer's. I have said this before but my goals with my husband are for him to feel safe and loved. I know he is going to die before very long and this is inevitable with Alzheimer's. Life can be prolonged by artificial means but I will not subject him to that.


about 7 years, said...

dear one of Mort, when we ask if anyone has any experience with something, that is what we are wanting to know. It is not necessarily a wholesale endorsement of any form of treatment. I personally have found that most medicines do not help my mom and therefore, I do not want to keep "experimenting" with her. If someone out here has something that has worked and their case is similar to mine, I might consider it but I know from experience the doctors are not always the guys on white horses they would like us to believe and that there are alternatives that are better and with less side effects than their pills..


about 7 years, said...

what are your thoughts on coconut oil for alzheimer's treatment?


about 7 years, said...

These are largely unproven ideas and shouldn't be perpetuated in a forum that I would like to be able to trust. Even the salutory effects of Donapezil in higher doses haven't been conclusively proved. As a friend of mine says: In God we trust; all others must show data.


about 7 years, said...

zoe, with this disease NOTHING is ever simple, short and to the point. I thought the article covered several great points and having lived with my mom's Alzheimer's for 9 years now, anything that will help me is welcomed. If you really want answers, you will have to take the time.


about 7 years, said...

I thought it was a excellent article. I would like to put their ideas into practice but I don't think I can remember them.


about 7 years, said...

calling my name over and over for 2 days now .. think i'm going mad omg . try ed changing her thought nothing has worked


over 7 years, said...

I found it very helpful!!! thks


over 7 years, said...

This article consistently implies a female patient. Is this information provided by an unbiased source and truly only valid for women, or is the author a feminist and men can also benefit?


over 7 years, said...

We all worry about the Alzheimer patient, but don't forget the caregiver. The amount of stress for the caregiver is monumental. We need to take some time for ourselves, so that we can continue to care for our loved one. Get someone to sit, so that you can get out to shop or have lunch with a friend. Don't lose contact with your friends. I know it always helps me to cope better with the situation.


over 7 years, said...

My husband has Alzheimer ,and we care for him at home. I love this web site so that I can find helpful ideas in caring for him. He is bed bound, and totally dependent on us for his care. I have to feed him, since he can't hold a spoon. I wonder if there is anyone out there caring for a bed bound patient, if so I would love to hear from them. I agree with this article you really need to become organized. It can take away a lot of stress to the care giver,


over 7 years, said...

The commets are all worth thinking about I'm trying right now the diet, is very important, and relaxing in a quiet inviroment it helps to minimize the depression and agitating stages to my knowledge right know it works 70% of the time and with patiants but in reality the desease will never go away.


almost 8 years, said...

Eating habits in referance vitamins


almost 8 years, said...

My wife a former chage nurse has demetia or worse. She denies her condition and becomes vey angry when I try to suggest things such as reading your reports. I donot let her drive and have not renewed her drives license. Any suggestion? Bobcares


about 8 years, said...

Found this to be comforting as my husband is in early stage and going thru tests just yet. He was put on Aricept only last Friday after seeing a neurologist about his memory loss in some areas.


about 8 years, said...

Thank you for these types of articles. My Mom was diagnosed 9 years ago. Thanks to our great God and medicine advancement, she is still able to dress, bathe, and live almost a normal life. The progress of her desease has really been halted. She lives with me and I provide her total care making sure she eats good balanced meals. Other than her short term memory, she can remember quite interesting stories from her past. I must say, sometimes she makes up quite a bit of adventerious stories of places she has never visited.


about 8 years, said...

It was not too many years ago that society would not openingly talk about this.Passed off as a mental health disorder, many people were confined to institutions way before their time. I wonder how long it will be before a cure is found?


about 8 years, said...

I thought the answers were good. We are all looking for a miracle cure....It's just not out there ! Yet. God Bless us all.


almost 10 years, said...

i came here to get answers, not for a phd--the article is too long