3 Ways to Help You Pay for Long-Term Nursing Home Care

3 Ways to Help You Pay for Long-Term Nursing Home Care
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The cost of nursing homes can range widely, from $3,000 per month up to $10,000 per month and more. How much a nursing home charges depends on geographic location, staffing levels, any specialty care offered, and size and quality of the physical facility. A facility with a special wing for Alzheimer's/dementia residents, for example, might charge more for that special care. Also, when you discuss fees with a facility, ask how often, and by how much, those fees have gone up in recent years, to get an idea of what you can expect in the coming years.

Note: Skilled nursing/rehabilitation care is different. The nursing home care discussed here is long-term, nonmedical residential care for someone who can no longer live on his or her own. That's different from acute, short-term skilled nursing or rehabilitation care that usually follows a hospitalization or a specific injury or severe illness. That kind of acute care is provided only at specially licensed skilled nursing or rehabilitation facilities and generally is paid for through Medicare and other health insurance. (Some long-term care nursing homes listed in this directory also have skilled nursing or rehabilitation wings.)

Learn more about some of the options that might be available to help pay for your loved one's long-term nursing home costs:

Public benefit programs | Private insurance options | Personal and family assets

You might also be interested in assisted living, which generally costs from $2,000 to $5,000 per month. Assisted living offers your loved one the benefits of community living and support for Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), though it's not ideal for someone who needs significant medical assistance. Find out more about how to pay for assisted living


about 1 month ago, said...

My mother is in need of a nursing home. She is unable to take care of herself. She has very little money but has V.A. benefits and medicare. What do I do?


about 1 year ago, said...

I recently went from Assisted Living to Nursing Home but don't know yet if Long Term insurance is going to pay. Big concern.


over 1 year ago, said...

My mom. Is in a new long care and Medicaid is paying for it. The nursing home. said because. She make 1600 a month. She has to give them. 1400 I was just. Wondering if. that was true or does. Medicaid. Pay it all


over 1 year ago, said...

My father is in a nursing home and he is private-paying until he pays down to $2000.00. At that time, we'll apply for Medicaid. My question is, before we apply for Medicaid and while he still has the money, can we pay for his funeral and headstone? He already had a funeral estimate but never paid for it.


over 1 year ago, said...

I am looking for a comfortable, place with excellent staff for my dying brother. Do you cover hospice clients?


over 3 years ago, said...

Check out Local Nursing Homes for up-to-date reviews, nursing home blogs, and senior living advice.


over 5 years ago, said...

@povdds, I am not aware of Medicare paying for a social worker. I think you mean Medicaid.


over 5 years ago, said...

Thanks, Scott . . . given the topic of the article, I should have mentioned that Medicare paid for all the social worker services. The social worker was able to give us excellent information about all the services we were eligible for and how to pay for them as well (and how to manage the daunting forms and paperwork).


over 5 years ago, said...

Great point by povdds. When a close relative of mine needed care, we were in great need for that kind of service. Whether it be a social worker or a "geriatric care manager" or a "care coordinator", the service is invaluable. Many of the leading long-term care insurance policies today will pay for the services of a social worker or geriatric care manager at the time one needs to being to use the policy. Scott A. Olson


over 5 years ago, said...

Reasonably good article, but definitely basic. Here's one major item the article left out: the Huge Benefit of finding a good social worker. We went through a difficult but very rewarding time caring for our relatives, and everyone we talked to about providing care gave us their individual inputs -- nurses gave us what we needed to provide nursing care, physicians told us what meds and treatment we needed, etc. etc. and that was great but . . . when the social worker arrived, we found someone who could put it ALL together, tell us what we were eligible for, etc. etc. All of a sudden, the vast number of little parts and individual pieces of the health care system were assembled into a finely-running watch. The Social Worker was like the conductor of the orchestra. Their inputs were the most valuable part of the overall process, and I cannot imagine going through all this without one. By the way, as a conflict of interest statement, neither I nor anyone in my immediate family or circle of friends is a social worker.


over 5 years ago, said...

Long Term Care Plans"¦the time is right! A 55 year old can buy coverage anywhere from $1800 per year for a basic plan to as much as $4000 per year for a very comprehensive plan. The point is that "significant" coverage is somewhere in between and a good plan should be tailored accordingly. LTC insurance protects retirement income. NY gives a pure 20% credit for total premium paid!


over 5 years ago, said...

Another funding method will be the CLASS Act. One of the worst fiscal nightmares facing our country is the reality of long-term care. Most Americans still think that Medicare covers the cost of long-term care. The CLASS Act helps to address this problem by making a very clear statement: You have to pay for your own long-term care. You either have to pay for your own long-term care by using your savings, the average $50 per day CLASS Act benefit, long-term care insurance, or a combination of these. The CLASS Act will not be an option for those who are already disabled (and unable to work) or those who are retired and do not want to work. Most of the 10 million Americans who own LTC insurance own it because they've seen family spend down their assets before qualifying for Medicaid. The CLASS Act will help alert the rest of the country to the fact that they need to plan for their future long term care needs. There's a lot of confusion about the CLASS Act. Here's a list of 13 facts about the program that are tucked away in the legislation: http://bit.ly/13_Facts_About_CLASS_Act Scott