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3 months ago, said...

They provide most current films and also video clips on their checklist. http://vidmateapkz.com A great deal of crazy people will invest their time by amusing.


about 2 years ago, said...

This is going to sound so awful, but i want a divorce. i will still stay and look after my husband, till the time comes when he needs to go in a home, but i dont want to be married to him any more, truth be said if this awful Alzheimer's had not happened, we would not be together now. but this is not the man i loved, and was not for a long time before it kicked in. im not a wife to him i am a skivvy to him. need to get my life back on track if poss and cant do that if i am married, im 53 and peter is 67. Am i so wrong comments please


over 4 years ago, said...

WHAT IS ANY TRUTH IS THERE TO COCONUT OIL SUPPLEMENT BEING ABLE TO REVERSE SOME DEMENTIA?


over 4 years ago, said...

My mom is 80. She cannot put together words that make sense. She doesn't want to eat. She can't sleep. She gets up in the middle of the night and puts different foods together like ice cream and avocado, but doesn't eat it. She put lipstick on her eyebrows. She says, "This is not my house". She doesn't walk very far. If it weren't for her care giver, she wouldn't change her clothes, or brush her teeth, or comb her hair. She is very near-sighted but won't wear her glasses anymore. She wakes up in the night, (well, really, she isn't sleeping and turns on all the lights).


over 4 years ago, said...

My friend(Max)is in a memory care home.He was a graduate e engineer and a bright man.He did drink 3 /4 cans of beer daily-and manhattan cocktails on weekends-do you think thjis contributed to his dementia? he is 85 yrs old and has had dementia for 2 yrs.I remember actor Paul Newman drank beer and he did not get dementia-does alcoho; consumption contribute to memory loss?


over 4 years ago, said...

My husband is now at the final stage of FTL Dementia. A PEG has been discussed and I would like to know about the pros and cons of this. Many thanks,


over 4 years ago, said...

Is here therapy available for early stage Alzheimer's ?


almost 5 years ago, said...

My wife has vascular dementia. She can not eat herself. She has to be fed by me. She can not take bath her self. She is to be bathed by me. Dressingand groomeing also by me.While walking with wheel chair or walker she is to be escorted by me for fear of falling. Unless some body is present she will not go to toilet for fear of falling. She can not pass her time on her own therfore she wants all the time some body with her. She forgets immediate things. She repeats anything many times till care giver gets annoyed. She is impatient and adament too.She is emotional. Onseeing some body new she starts weeping and she also feels happy.Good part is that her eye sight is ok her hearing is ok,her smalling is ok. She never sleeps soundly.She is practically awake all the time. She can not sit for more than half an hour in the chair due to back pain in the lower weist region. She had burning in urethra while urinateing and otherwise too. With all these symptoms i would like to know what is her dementia state ? This is because I could not do this. Please help me. Thanks.


almost 5 years ago, said...

Does 'Severe' Alzheimer's correlate to Stages 6 and 7, or just Stage 7?


almost 5 years ago, said...

It covered a lot. I realize by seeing the early, mid, and late stage symptoms of mild Alzheimer's, about where my husband is on the progression. I think that early, sustained use of the Exelon patch has helped a LOT.


over 5 years ago, said...

I've had mom for seven months at my home ans although i can't explain the changes i've seen them. she doesnt seem to really know who anybody is except my sister. she is incontinent but she was trying to get to the bathroom now she thinks she was already there and we have to force her to get up to get changed and cleaned up. sometimes i will tell her to eat and she doesnt understand because she's almost deaf and going blind from cataracts and glucoma. i get frustrated trying to help her i know she cant help it. she is 85 and thinks she's just a young girl. she cries for the babies that she doesnt have and every day she cries thinking that she was just told that her mother, or father, or her husband or children died. she wants to go home and keeps waiting for someone to pick her up to take her home. to bathe her or to change her clothing she thinks she is being sexually violated. she wakes in the middle of the night yelling telling her children to get down get to bed or get up for school. i get grumpy sometimes because i have a husband with diabetes and two of my grandchildren living with me because of two of my children going through divorce. I love my mother and try to do all i can, lately she doesnt want to eat. after a bite she says she cant eat anymore. give her sugar foods and shell eat -sometimes. she lays on the couch all day amd sometimes might get up and walk around the kitchen table because shes supposed to be somewhere. the last couple of days she doesnt seem to want to do a whole lot of anything i dont understand what stage she is in, or how fast this disease really progresses. my sisters and brothers know but they just stay away because they cant deal with it .


over 5 years ago, said...

I've had mom for seven months at my home ans although i can't explain the changes i've seen them. she doesnt seem to really know who anybody is except my sister. she is incontinent but she was trying to get to the bathroom now she thinks she was already there and we have to force her to get up to get changed and cleaned up. sometimes i will tell her to eat and she doesnt understand because she's almost deaf and going blind from cataracts and glucoma. i get frustrated trying to help her i know she cant help it. she is 85 and thinks she's just a young girl. she cries for the babies that she doesnt have and every day she cries thinking that she was just told that her mother, or father, or her husband or children died. she wants to go home and keeps waiting for someone to pick her up to take her home. to bathe her or to change her clothing she thinks she is being sexually violated. she wakes in the middle of the night yelling telling her children to get down get to bed or get up for school. i get grumpy sometimes because i have a husband with diabetes and two of my grandchildren living with me because of two of my children going through divorce. I love my mother and try to do all i can, lately she doesnt want to eat. after a bite she says she cant eat anymore. give her sugar foods and shell eat -sometimes. she lays on the couch all day amd sometimes might get up and walk around the kitchen table because shes supposed to be somewhere. the last couple of days she doesnt seem to want to do a whole lot of anything i dont understand what stage she is in, or how fast this disease really progresses. my sisters and brothers know but they just stay away because they cant deal with it .


over 5 years ago, said...

A GOOD "BREAK DOWN" OF THE VARIOUS STAGES, WITH SPECIFIC NOTATIONS. IT DID LEAVE ME WITH A QUESTION, THOUGH. I NOTICE MANY OF THE FACTORS, BUT ALSO NOTE THAT SOME ARE IN ONE STAGE, AND SOME ARE NOTED AS A DIFFERENT STAGE. CONFUSING. GEEZER81


over 5 years ago, said...

My mother is 93 and is probably in the moderate stage of Alzhiemers. She is in an assisted living community. She can carry on lucid conversations with us but will talk about her grandchildren sleeping over or seeing spiders on the ceiling. None of which is true or happens. She cries a lot and can't understand why we had to sell her home of 61 years. She gets confused as to time and claims someone has changed it. Also when she can't find something she thinks it has been stolen. Suspects the caregivers for everything out of the ordinary. She doesn't want to participate in any activities and is easliy frightened by noises. She becomes angry when she thinks about her home and the furnishings. She wants to see them. We tell her they are in storage but most have been sold. It's hard to tell her lies, however, it would crush her to know they are not still hers. She says she wakes in the middle of the night and cries and doesn't know why. From time to time she will talk about my father, who died many years ago, as if he is still here. She has a hard time understanding how to use the telephone. She will sometimes think the TV remote is a phone or the numbers written on a board are connected to the phone. If she has an appointment coming up she will get ready for it days ahead of time and be confused as to when it is even though I have told her every day. I'm trying to be very patient with her but find it very hard as it can be so exasperating. Even though she does not live with us, it seems most of my time is consumed with her care. I feel so bad for her as she is so miserable and sad. I feel like a jailer and have put her in a prison. She constantly talks about moving from there and buying a house. This is horrible to say but I almost wish she was at a stage where she wasn't aware of her surroundings so that she would not be so miserable and sad. I hate to feel that way but I also hate to see her suffer when there is nothing we can do for her.


over 5 years ago, said...

Please explain the medical reason people die of Alzheimers..I am new to this (my husband was diagnosed 2 yrs ago), and do not understans the clinical reason why this disease is termed terminal.


almost 6 years ago, said...

@Anonymous We're very sorry to hear of the pain you described. It sounds like you may be experiencing depression, which is a serious health problem that requires attention and care from a doctor or licensed medical professional offline. This is not a problem that can resolved in the comments section of an online article. Please immediately seek help by calling your doctor, 911 or a toll-free crisis hotline, such as 1-800-784-2433 or 1-800-273-8255. We've also emailed this information to you, and hope you will follow-up to receive help offline immediately. Caregivers can also find information about burnout here: http://www.caring.com/just-for-caregivers. For caregiving respite, please consider contacting your local Area Agency on Aging (http://www.caring.com/local/area-agency-on-aging) or hiring an in-home care service provider (http://www.caring.com/local/in-home-care). Thank you!


almost 6 years ago, said...

I don't know what to say, but does anyone really care? I ve been thrown away and allI want to do is sleep. The pain both physical and mental is too much. AllI know has ever reallycared they areimpatient. Goodbye


almost 6 years ago, said...

My husband sleeps most of the day; doesn't remember day; time or past. Asks questions like when are we going home? Where are mom and dad? How old am I? He reads all newspapers and books out loud. Always says they put in new words or sentences that make no sense. He either eats like there are no tomorrow or won't eat anything for two or three days. He doesn't remember medication; where he put hearing aids or glass's.


almost 6 years ago, said...

very helpful, direct an easy to follow.


almost 6 years ago, said...

Hello opp, Thank you for your comment! If you'd like, you can post any questions you have in our Ask & Answer section, here: ( http://www.caring.com/ask ). I hope that helps! Take care -- Emily | Community Manager


almost 6 years ago, said...

Parent taking aricept and vitamin b12 shots any natural meds to help memory and behavior?


almost 6 years ago, said...

does the person who wrote this have alzheimers? They wrote "often forgets to refill prescriptions" at least three times!


almost 6 years ago, said...

The informatiom i read helped me altho some of it was mild , moderate and severe, it seemed the person i was thinking of had some of the symptons of all three stages.Thank you for sharing.


almost 6 years ago, said...

It was alittle confusing, I was lost in the different stages until I figured it out. I still am not sure what stage my husband is in, but thank-you.


almost 6 years ago, said...

I'm 50and lost both parents, a grandmother on my mother's side and grandfather on my father's side to Alzheimer's. I have ADDHD and have suffered all my life with it. I have always forgotten things and am worried I won't know if/when I will have Alzheimers. Does Alzheimer's affect a person in a different way and/or is there something I should look for?


about 6 years ago, said...

Why do they sometimes become very mean and threatening?


about 6 years ago, said...

In spite of all efforts by many doctors and by caregiver now I have come to coclusion that my wife's dementia can not be cured. She is 71 years old. She had stroke due blocked arteries in brain about a year and half back.She recovered from her physical problems. But after six months of stroke she developed vascular dementia.Is there any remedy for this by way of medicine or some therapy like physiotherapy. I have not heard of single case of this nature getting cured. Please enlighten me.


about 6 years ago, said...

Its very hard to get nmy mom to it or drink...any ideas caregivers....


about 6 years ago, said...

the different stages. And what to expect.


about 6 years ago, said...

While these stage identifiers are helpful, a person with Alzheimer's/Dementia may exhibit symptoms from more than one category; thereby making it difficult to pinpoint the exact stage of their condition. If you are not sure in which stage your loved one is, ask their psychiatrist and gerontologist. Open dialogue with your loved one's primary physicians can provide mutually beneficial information, and better care for your loved one.


about 6 years ago, said...

Hello b5468, Thank you very much for your question. Here is an Ask & Answer page that may help answer your question: ( http://www.caring.com/questions/what-is-silent-aspiration ). Take care -- Emily | Community Manager


about 6 years ago, said...

What is silent aspiration?


about 6 years ago, said...

I WISH I HAD THIS INFORMATION WHEN MY FATHER BEGINS SHOWING THIS SYMPTOMS BECAUSE MY MOM AND MYSELF WE DIDN'T KNOW WHAT WAS WRONG WITH MY DAD. THE INFORMATION WILL BE HELPFUL TO UNDERSTAND OTHER PEOPLE AND FAMILY.


about 6 years ago, said...

Hi Dkeeton, thanks for your comment. That's a great question. It is possible for dementia to result from strokes. To learn more, take a look at the article here: ( http://www.caring.com/articles/non-alzheimers-dementia ). I hope this helps. -- Jeff


about 6 years ago, said...

My mother had a stoke and after that is when her momory started going. Could a stroke bring on the dementia?


about 6 years ago, said...

My father died of this desease six years ago. My mohther and I attended to him in his last hours, in the end I believe it was his heart that gave out. We had signed a release statement to let him die at home, and were at his side when he passed. While he struggled to breathe, we were beginning to have a change of heart because at that time, it was not easy for him and us. This all took place during a hurricane and the phones to our Hospice center were knocked out. We had no choice to let him go, with us doing our best to comfort him.


about 6 years ago, said...

I t hink whoever wrote t his is in early stages of Alzheimers. They repeat the same thing several times. For instance, under Mid Mild-Stage Dementia Symptoms, repeats forgets to fill prescriptions/often forgets to fill prescriptions. I found it helpful but lets face it, not everyone with early Alzheimers is on medication so you mention it a bit too much as a symptom. Also, everyone needs to understand that the busier you are, the more likely you are to forget something or miss it ocassionallly. It may not mean there is anything wrong with you regarding early alzheimers. See your doctor if you have multiple symptoms.


about 6 years ago, said...

It's so depressing. I have a 74 year old friend who lost his home. His kids don't want him, so now he's living with me. He seems to exhibiting Mid Mild Stage symptoms. It's just sad


about 6 years ago, said...

I may not leave many comments but that doesn't mean I'm not reading everything. Things are definitely deteriorating with my George and it's getting more and more difficult. Lately he does not want to wash up and his answer to most every thing is "NO." Doesn't seem unhappy but is definitely completely confused.... ClaraV


about 6 years ago, said...

Hi roofette, Thank you for your question, it's a good one! If you'd like, you can post your question in our Ask & Answer section, here: ( http://www.caring.com/ask ). Take care -- Emily | Community Manager


about 6 years ago, said...

What type of professional does one need to see to diagnose and to obtain any helpful medications? The family doctor or a specialist?


about 6 years ago, said...

Having a better idea where we are in this process of the disease......thanks!


over 6 years ago, said...

Hi anonymous, Thanks for your question. It's hard to tell the symptom of Alzheimer's from only one symptom. But, if you'd like to get a ballpark idea of what symptom your loved one is in, I'd suggest taking our short questionnaire in our Steps & Stages program, here ( http://www.caring.com/steps-stages/alzheimers ). I hope that helps. Good luck and take care -- Emily | Community Manager


over 6 years ago, said...

what stage are they in when they wake up aand think it is time to take their medicine again?


over 6 years ago, said...

Hi D.K.P's daug­hter-in-, Thanks for your question, it's a tough one. If you'd like, you can post your question in our Ask & Answer section located here: ( http://www.caring.com/ask). Good luck, and take care -- Emily | Community Manager


over 6 years ago, said...

Thank You! I promised to be open and honest about meds care ect. and what he could expect about what is coming or going to happen because of this disea but their is nothing good or positive. It is all really bad and depressing and the life expectancy is short he also has Lewy Body Dementia. How much do i tell him?Every time i read anything it makes me want to cry and i don't want to make him anymore depressed than he already is.


over 6 years ago, said...

Thank you


over 6 years ago, said...

Hi scate, Thanks for sharing your experience with us, it's very helpful for other caregivers to know they aren't alone when seeing these symptoms. Excessive sleeping ( http://www.caring.com/questions/alzheimers-sleeping-a-lot ), and asking to go home ( http://www.caring.com/blogs/caring-currents/i-want-to-go-home ) are common symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. If you'd like to learn more about each symptom, you can check out the links I've provided above. Take care -- Emily -- Community Manager


over 6 years ago, said...

My husband has alzheimer's and sleeps 16 to 42 hours at a time. He asks me frequently , "Where were we before were here. When are we going to go home?


over 6 years ago, said...

Hi jbarmymom, thanks for your comment. Temper and aggressive behavior can really appear at any stage and can start as early as the first stages. Not everyone becomes aggressive or has a temper thought, it can depend on the person, what kinds of medication they are on, and the situation they are in. Thanks again for your comment! -- Emily | Community Manager


over 6 years ago, said...

Temper Do some get really mean and at what stage


over 6 years ago, said...

I was surprised at how many of these symptoms he has.


over 6 years ago, said...

Hi why, thanks for your comment. As you may have already discovered, Alzheimer's is a complicated and difficult disease. But you don't have to feel alone. Caring.com offers a great Alzheimer's tip program, Steps & Stages http://www.caring.com/steps-stages/alzheimers. After taking a short quiz, you'll be given practical tips on dealing with the symptoms that you are seeing. We also offer a great support group area called Stage Groups. If you have specific questions you'd like answered, you can also always post a question to our Ask & Answer section, here: ( http://www.caring.com/ask ). I hope these resources help get you started. -- All the best, Emily | Community Manager


over 6 years ago, said...

so what i do about it iam all hes got he dont want any one to but me sometimes its ok sometimes .its better then it was ?why


over 6 years ago, said...

My mother passed away from complications of Alzheimer's disease in May 2003. I found this site and just wanted to use it to compare the symptoms my mother went through as the disease progressed. It gave me chills as I read about each stage and the symptoms associated. In a way, I re-lived what I saw happening to my mother on a daily basis. The symptom stages are identical to what she went through. I guess more than being "helpful", this article made me realize what was going as she got closer to the end of her life.


over 6 years ago, said...

My grandma is in the mad last stage i'm so worried about her i don't know how I'm going to cope with all the grieving and who will i talk to Victoria (13)


over 6 years ago, said...

the desciption of the symptoms seen in each stage.


over 6 years ago, said...

My mother is late Moderate Stage I believe. My father passwed away almost 3 years ago. My mother and the rest of the family were by his side when he passed. She somehow believes that he is alive and has left her for another woman, and they had a baby and live up north somewhere. She naturally is upset about this and when I tell her she is having a false memory, or must have had a bad dream, and that Dat died, she is then upset about that. So, she is either upset that he has left her or upset that he died, and then upset that she can't remember it. Wereally don't know how to handle this or if it even matters, because a short while later it starts all over. I know there is no miracle anwser here, I'm just sharing. thanks,


over 6 years ago, said...

Hi anonymous, Your may find some cleaning tips on this question page: (http://www.caring.com/questions/how-should-i-clean-skin-after-incontinence). You can also post your question in our Ask & Answer section here: (http://www.caring.com/ask). I hope that helps. -- Emily


over 6 years ago, said...

My husband is in need of more personal hygiene. How can help him when he needs to go to the bathroom? I don't feel he cleans himself very well.


over 6 years ago, said...

Hi mwr, Thanks for your comment. I'm glad to hear you wife is doing well in her nursing home. It's also wonderful to hear that your sons are able to visit so often. If you'd like input on your question, you can ask it here in our Ask & Answer: (http://www.caring.com/ask). I hope that helps. -- Emily


over 6 years ago, said...

my wife was diagnosed n 2002, today she thinks I'm her father(most of the time) and cannot remember which of our sons is which, names, etc. she is happy in a nursing home in Jax. my sons and I got to see her weekly, is a visitor every other day, too often?


over 6 years ago, said...

Helpful only in that a few items in the Late/Moderate Stage would seem to match those of my Jan's. She long ago could not longer write or read. So she is incapable of a note as a reminder. In fact her whole thinking process is in dissaray. Yesterday we were in what I think was our last interview with a Medicaid social Worker with the Department of Elder Affairs who told me she thought Jan was ready for Assisted Living help but not for a Nursing Home. I disagreed. She can no longer be left alone and can do absolutely nothing on her own. How this woman came to her conclusion I don't have a clue. Still, I think she is going to approve Jan for the Day Care Program.....which is approved by Medicaid for Alzheimer's clients. I am beginning to think that even people in the know tend to perceive an Alzheimer's person differently. At one point of the interview yesterday the person asking the questions told me her questions were stated in such a way to find out if we were telling the truth. I didn't care for that statement! I have learned that I have trouble judging one person from another with the disease. And I have lots of trouble with charts that categorize different stages of the disease as well. That is to say I have trouble placing my Jan in any category. Most of the time she doesn't fit. Our Neurologist recently told us that she was about to go into the final stage and that it would go much faster than the Early Stages of the disease. I said, how long? He said probably less than a year. It moves much faster in Early Stage people. Perhaps six years for a duration. We will see. I do appreciate the work you people are doing and it has helped me in many ways.......especially the different circumstances of those who comment. That in itself helps me place my Jan on a spectrum. Thanks and good luck..... Jean-Paul


over 6 years ago, said...

To have best results from treatment me and many doctors prescribing medicines are to be coordinated critically. That needs intelligent. Unfortunately medical professionals themselves never co-operate with each other because of commercial interests. If that attitude is changed the discease will easily get cured or stabilised. I heve done that and my wife is improving slowly. I am confident that another six months and she will be restored to condition before stroke.


over 6 years ago, said...

Mainly four stages are involved in diseases that is Pre-dementia,Early,Moderate and Advanced these stages are concerned with progressive patterns of cognitive and functional http://www.biblehealth.com/alzheimers/alzheimers-stages-are-based-on-the-progression-of-disease.html


over 6 years ago, said...

going by what ive read,my mother cant haver alzheimers


over 6 years ago, said...

Lo encuentro muy educativo. Ha sido de gran ayuda. Gracias.


over 6 years ago, said...

Stop drinking and eating things with asparthame. And give up soda/pop.


over 6 years ago, said...

easy to read


over 6 years ago, said...

Under the Mid-Mild stage description, the writer twice wrote "forgets to fill prescriptions". Early sign of Alzheimer's? Hopefully not. My mother had this terrible disease and I wouldn't want it for anyone.


over 6 years ago, said...

My mom who is now deceased suffered for over 20 years with many physical issues,some of which I have at present. She also had dementia but showed symptoms totally different from my father-in-law that we are caring for now. They also said she had "White Matter Disease". What exactly is that and am I destined to inherit it?


over 6 years ago, said...

I was not clear about some symptoms my father-in-law shows and this made them more clear to me. It also showed me some things we "missed" as a sign that he indeed had a problem.


almost 7 years ago, said...

SOMEONE PLEASE FIND A CURE QUICK!


almost 7 years ago, said...

Anyone with this horrible disease in the family,caretakers,spouses ect please go to Alzheimers Spouse .com absolutely the best site for care givers an spouses on the net,wife was placed in assisted living home June 1st after 3 years of trying to care for her at home,without that site I would have been lost an at the mercy of health professionals that havn't a clue,not all but the majority are only guessing as far as I'm concerned


almost 7 years ago, said...

I like the way all the stages are explained, particularly what to expect and how to deal with them. Thank you.


almost 7 years ago, said...

doctors said my dad has protein amyloids in the brain. that caused alzheimers, but their is no medication for this disease. is that true. they took a biopsy of his brain to determine this. was that nessary.


almost 7 years ago, said...

Just knowing where he is at. It brought me to tears. Hopefully the rest of the family will read this and take it to heart too.


almost 7 years ago, said...

My advice is for you (and other family members) to keep a pad of paper nearby and document the changes you are seeing. This is all a part of this wicked disease so I implore you keep in mind she cannot help what she's doing, as hard as it is to believe. Meanness toward family is very familiar to me, then there will be the sweet times, the silent times and the sad times, etc. But yes, take her to the doctor (on a regular basis, because this IS a disease) and start jotting the changes now and take them with you. A doctor familiar with the disease will understand you see something different than he is seeing. My mother's doctor had her draw a simple clock one day to see if she could still do it. She could, but he didn't make it clear he wanted it to be a good size to work with and her drawing was so small it made it difficult for her to add the numbers to it, but it gave him some inkling of how she was doing. They have several simple 'tests' they can do to see how their cognition is, and that can be somewht helpful. Read all you can about this disease, and encourage others in the family to do so as well. Some of my family members didn't understand and tried to make my mother 'responsible' for her behavior, but that was an outlandish request of them----they cannot help what is going on with them, and it's very frightening for them, too. One day your mother will not be able to dress herself or make it to the potty, so read up on the progression and start getting things in place to help YOU cope, because this is the roughest ride I've ever been on. Bless all of you on this sad journey---ours is over, but this is still a very painful, sad topic for us, and I would do anything to help. All I can give are tips, but this will vary from person to person and the progression varies, too, so it's hard to pinpoint very much. And I agree with others who have commented----just when you think you are 'used' to their newest 'behavior', it changes just that quickly, and you are off to the races again, trying to cope with the newest. Very hard to keep up AND keep your sanity and health intact. Devastating is a mild term for what this disease really is.....and yes, love them like they are the same person they've always been---this will help you in the end, in my opinion. And somewhere, deep down in there, there is a part of them that knows you are doing the best you can to help them, so yes, love them like you always have.


almost 7 years ago, said...

I am having a difficult time figuring out what stage my mother-in-law is in. She is taking medication for alzheimers/dementia. The only things that she will do are feed herself, get dressed and undressed, and go to the restroom alone. She doesn't cook, clean, drive. If we attempt to do things around her house she gets on to us saying that she will do it, she never does. She has recently become mean. Tries to throw things and is verbally abusive to family members. She knows everyone, she remembers things from long ago. She is sharp as a tack some days and "silly" other days. Do we need to get her back to the doctor to see if things have changed? She is good as gold around everyone but family. Her doctor would think nothing has changed.


almost 7 years ago, said...

my Father was diagnosed 1997 and passed 2006. I lived and watched the progression take my dad away. He was a retired pharmacisist, old school motar and pestal druggest, a very smart man. About two yrs befor he died he no longer knew who I was. Honestly that is when he died to me.I, my mother and sister where holding his hands when he took his last breath, reciting the lords prayer over and over. for those who are dealing with thier loved ones and alzheimers, love them every day like they still know you, I think it helps


almost 7 years ago, said...

Well we entered a new chapter in this dreadful disease. My husbands appetite was very good almost too good, last couple of weeks he would want to eat everything in site. Now all of a sudden the appetite is completely gone. In fact if I wouldn't push to eat at least 1/4 of what he used to eat he wouldn't eat at all. He seems to stay in bed more & more ("it feels good", Conversation has been limited for some time, now it's almost non excistent If sure feels like we have entered the latent stage of the disease. Life has been like a roller coaster ride, one week you think you have a handle on the situation, until a new dilemma arrives


almost 7 years ago, said...

MY MOTHER WAS IN MID SEVERS STAGE OF THE DISEASE AND SHE HAD GRAND MAL SEIZURE AND NOW SHE IS WALKING AGAIN AND SPEAKING AND MAKING A CONNECTION WITH EVERY THING FOR THE LAST FOUR DAYS OR IS THIS THE CALM BEFORE THE STORM!!


almost 7 years ago, said...

to all you caregivers, as one with Early Stage Severe AD, i and others like me are greatfull, whether we act like it or not. You see you live in a world of so called reality, we live in an ever changing world of non reality. To Kay'sonegirl my heart goes out to you, but your MOM has won the battle she is free now, a state I look forward to. If you with I run a blog: http://living-with-alzhiemers.blogspot.com/ , I try to get pictures of those set free, if you with to send me one to post, Please do so, all I request is first name, year of birth and year set free. I try to pay homage to those who have gone before me. God Bless, Joe


almost 7 years ago, said...

Being diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease can flood the patient and their loved ones with a variety of emotions and concerns. Currently, scientists are studying Alzheimer's Disease from several different angles. Advances in medical genetics, pharmacologic therapy, and stem cell research hold promise for the Alzheimer's patient. All scientific research, past, present and future, serves to promote more accurate diagnoses and provide more effective care plans for patients, loved ones and caretakers. Here is a nice PDF by BrightStar Care on how to identify Alzheimers, Dementia and age-related memory changes http://www.brightstarcare.com/download/Identifying_Alzheimers.pdf


almost 7 years ago, said...

How long can a person with alzhiemers expect to live?


almost 7 years ago, said...

This certainly helped me some - From the onset (about three years ago) I made the decision to never mention the words Alzheimer or Dimentia to my husband. I felt if he knew he would become very depressed. He has never mentioned it to me either. He will say at times "I don't know what's wrong but I think I'm losing it." He seems to be content 95% of the time, We laugh at his short-comings and get through the day. I do pick up alot of the slack so he may not notice that he isn't able to do what he did in the past. He was the handiest guy in the world - there was nothing he couldn't fix or do and enjoyed it. Now he can't count, tell time, doesn't know the seasons of the year, can't shower alone, dress etc. Sooo we do everything together - actually we are joined at the hip. I'm not complaining - if the shoe was on the other foot he would do the same. I think I'll stop - I can go on and on but am resigned to the fact that "it is what it is." Thanks for listening - forgive any misspellings I can't us spell check in these comments... ClaraV


almost 7 years ago, said...

Hi, My wife is in her sixth year of Alzheimer's and her Neurologist (a very good one), tells us that she is ready to go into the final stage (what you are calling the sever stage) and when she does he thinks she won't last a year. That's pretty severe. My question to you is, why are there symptoms in early to late severe stage that apply to my wife and others that don't. For example, my wife hasn't been able to answer a phone, take her meds when the time comes, or even what they are. She cannot read, write or even sign her name, she cannot dress herself or bathe herself and has lots of trouble with toiletry functions. She wears depends. I literally have to do everything for her. She even is beginning to have trouble eating....but not swallowing. She doesn't seem to have come to the stage of recognition yet. That is, she does recognize people, however can have trouble with names of friends but not so with family. She has never become disoriented and in her second year (4 years ago) she lost her ability to drive because she failed the cognitive tests. I now live with the fear that she will suddenly not know me and that this will be the beginning of the end. Sorry for being so transparent. I am a tired caregiver who thinks he can do it all....and never asks for help. JP


almost 7 years ago, said...

My mom eats all the time....can't remember what she has eaten at all so gets more....leaves trails of food across the floor as she eats while walking. Gaining weight and my fear is she won't be able to wipe herself as she is widening quite a bit and finding it more difficult to get out of her chair as a result. I leave her a list of what she has eaten but she doesn't read it. Very unaware of it actually. Yet, she is horrified when I tell her "that's your 4th chocolate pudding today". Not sure what to do as she does the majority of her eating at night when I'm sleeping. She has celery sticks and apple sauce right in the front of the fridge but grabs the pudding. If we have a chocolate cake in the house, she will eat a LOT during the night and the trail of crumbs is quite obvious.


almost 7 years ago, said...

Funny you would mention memory as a guide to which stage they are in. My wife, we are told by her Neurologist is in the Late Moderate Stage, ready to go into the Final Stage (or Severe Stage) Sometime in the Early Stages of the disease she lost the ability to read, write, drive a car and a few other things you mention in the Severe Stage. Now, in the Moderate Stage she cannot dress herself, has trouble with toiletry, has trouble eating, literally she cannot do anything for herself, but her memory has not gone along with what you are saying. She will remember that someone called, but not what they said. She never talks about family, however can usually be nudged a little to name some of them. I guess I would say she is already living in the moment. She does not wander or even get mad. She cries easily. I have begun to believe that each Alzheimer's person is different and seems to follow their own personality.........is it fair to say that? Thank you, Jean-Paul


almost 7 years ago, said...

Certainly the information will help me to put patient's condition to doctor in the most accurate fashion.Thank you caring dot com.


almost 7 years ago, said...

Jan, my mother just passed on Labor Day, but what I want to tell you is this----PLEASE be sure the home she is in is very much aware of her swallowing problem. She should be monitored by them at all meals and they probably should be giving her pureed foods and thickened liquids. I put my mother in a nursing home in Feb., and they did not properly monitor her in so many ways, I won't bother to tell you. But I've never been so shocked in my life to see someone slip away so quickly. It was like water thru my fingers, she went so fast, and right before my eyes. I want you to not feel like you're 'bothering' the staff at the home, and go as high up as necessary, but ASK them what they are doing to help your mother eat and drink. And TELL them you want reports about how it's all going, and follow-up---get down to business with them, so to speak. My mother was 90, and they would not do a feeding-tube surgery because doctors felt she would not survive the surgery, so I did not want to put her thru something so painful only to have her die in that manner. I would never have told you she was in the last stages, so it is very hard to determine what is going on with them, I now know. She still knew us and we could still have lucid conversations with her. In fact, just two days before she slipped into a semi-coma, she was riding in my car from the hospital to a new nursing home, talking about how she thought she was missing a hair appt., and we talked about what a beautiful day it was. Two days later, she was about to die, and I was devastated. It took her 10 more days to finally slip away, but I'll never get over it. I am sorry to be so melancholy, and I don't want to depress, scare or upset you, but when I saw what you said about swallowing, the alarms went off in my head, and I just wanted to tell you to be vigilant NOW. My mother suffered from 'silent aspiration', which I never knew about----when food and water go down the 'wrong pipe' they won't cough or choke, and you will NOT even know it's happening. The staff at the home should be very well-versed in this scenario, so please just be a task-master and be a pest if you must. It's your mom and no one cares about her the way you do, so please advocate for her safety while eating. Also, if they vomit, this could also be easily aspirated, so this is definitely the time for the staff at her home to be put on notice you expect everything to be done to keep her safe while eating and drinking. My best to you and your mom. This is one of the worst diseases I've seen---so sad and devastating to the patient and family, and not unlike a cancerous type disease, in it's own odd way. Bless you for being there for your mom, and I'll keep you both in my prayers. Ask that nursing home staff SPECIFICALLY about silent aspiration......you should be able to get an idea of how much they know just by asking that question. If they don't appear to know, be sure to mention this to the higher-up people in the administration there----if they truly don't know, they MUST be educated and immediately so....


almost 7 years ago, said...

I am not sure how to understand what stage of dementia my mom is presently in. She barely says anything anymore and is so fidgety just wanting to get out of the day room at her nursing home to go to her room to go to bed or go to the bathroom, although she removes her diapers and has peed on her chair/floor. Trouble swallowing food; eats very little. Doesn't understand my Dad just died. She is just very happy when I visit which makes me feel good. Just scared of what to expect next and don't want her to lose weight.