5 Kinds of Medical Care Someone With Severe Dementia May Still Need

You already know that your loved one's doctor can't really cure or treat severe dementia. And routine screenings for breast, cervical, colon, and prostate cancer are no longer recommended for adults over age 75 (it's now advised to consult with one's physician on an individual basis). But that's not to say an older loved one with dementia needs no medical care at all. These often-overlooked kinds of medical care can add greatly to quality of life:

1. Routine dental cleanings and care

Reason: Untended infections can cause pain and delirium, and even death if the brain is affected. Your loved one may not be able to articulate the presence of a dental problem, which means the infection could run rampant before it's detected.

2. Eye care

Reason: Vision problems are a common cause of increased agitation and confusion, as well as falls that lead to broken bones. If your loved one wears glasses, be sure they're kept clean and in good repair. An eye doctor may also be able to screen for progressive eye conditions, depending on your loved one's condition.

SEE ALSO: Find Memory Care Near You

3. Flu shots

Reason: Frail, older adults tend to have compromised immunity. Flu is a preventable disease, and uncomfortable when it's experienced.

4. Podiatry care

Reason: Older feet can develop infections in the toenail beds. Unclipped long nails can be a falling hazard. And diabetics need routine inspections for cuts and scrapes that can lead to infection; left untreated, the person may be at risk for amputation.

5. Visual inspection for bedsores

Reason: People who spend the majority of time in wheelchairs, chairs, or bed are at high risk for pressure sores. If you can't do this inspection yourself, it's wise to have a professional do so.


almost 2 years ago, said...

And how do you get these services when Mom is house bound??? Can anyone comment or advise...


almost 2 years ago, said...

That's why we us girls take mom / mother in law out for a pampered day. It helps alot we all sit and get ours done to.


almost 2 years ago, said...

Very good to know. We always keep on top of my mother in laws needs. Even if it's a small one. We want her to be as comfortable as long as she can.


about 3 years ago, said...

As always good advice... and accessemnt of your own situation is crucial....


over 3 years ago, said...

These are very appropriate guidelines but unfortunately my hubby is bedridden and these trips are not accessible unless taken in an ambulance (frightening for those with mid stage severe dementia) to a hospital. Thank you for listening! Need help in Ontario


over 4 years ago, said...

All the information Thank-you so much!!


over 4 years ago, said...

Yes, as a CNA; I did know about the dental, vision problems ( my mother has macular degeneration & the bed sores. But lately I have noticed her toenails are much harder, growing much faster, curving/curling & are more often getting fungus problems. I have now been clipping her nails weekly & using a scipt from her doctor.