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Is there a law that limits how many residents a Certified Nurse Assistant can care for?

42 answers | Last updated: Oct 19, 2014
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Q
An anonymous caregiver asked...
Is there a law that limits how many residents each CNA (Certified Nurse Assistant)can care for? I have seen one CNA care for up to 20 residents at a time before. Are the laws different for each state?
 

Answers
Caring.com User - Carolyn  L.  Rosenblatt
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Carolyn Rosenblatt, R.N. and Attorney is the author of author of The Boomer's Guide to Aging Parents. She has over 40 years of...
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answered...

I do not know of a law that specifically limits the number of residents a CNA can have at any one time. I don't claim expertise on that point. The See also:
11 Signs It Might Be Time for Assisted Living
law does give some guidance on how many hours per day of nursing care a nursing home resident must receive. The laws that affect nursing facilities are both from the Centers For Medicare/Medicaid Services (CMS) and from state laws and regulations. In that regard, they do vary from state to state. For instance, in California, there is a state law setting nurse/patient ratios in hospitals while other states don't have the same law.

You do not say whether you have a loved one in a nursing home, or what the cause of your concern is. I suspect you are close to the problem of overworked nursing assistants and have raised the question because it affects the care of someone close to you. If that is your situation, it is important to raise your concerns with the facility where you are seeing this overload on CNA's. It does not sound safe. Have you spoken to the director of nursing?

It has been historically true that long term nursing care facilities were understaffed. Whether that is different where you are depends on many factors, including the attitude of the administrators and the availability of CNA's. Many facilities are out of compliance with applicable laws about staffing. I know from my own experience of working as a nurse's aide in nursing homes, lifting, moving, bathing, feeding, dressing, transferring, turning, cleaning and checking bedridden residents that no one can safely care for 20 infirm people like that at the same time. If that is what you are seeing, I hope you will speak up about it and try to get it changed.

 

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FrancesC answered...

I am a CNA in the state of Georgia and I can tell you in Georgia there is not a LAW that regulates how many people a CNA can care for. There are, however, state regulations enforced by the Georgia Department of Community Health that specify what the caregiver to resident ratio must be in assisted living (also known as personal care homes) and nursing homes. You should search your state's regulation web sites to find the information you're looking for or call your local council on aging. Start with http://www.ncoa.org/ and search for your state.

 

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An anonymous caregiver answered...

i am happy with that answer because its so sad to see thosecnas worked to death like that i was one my selfe i took care of 21 patients night and when i got off my shife i socked my feet took ahot bath but my body wouldent let me move the next i cryed because i need my job and i like taking care of my patients but bodys telling me no please give me some advice.

 

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FrancesC answered...

Anonymous: Have you considered working for a health care staffing agency such as Home Instead, Visiting Angels or Bright Star? I don't know what part of the country you're in, but in my area these places are always looking for CNAs to be placed with people who need help. I have worked for a couple of different agencies and the ones I worked for did temporary assignments (one or more days) as well as long-term assignments. I don't know what these agencies pay in relation to a nursing home or assisted living, but in all of the assignments I've had I have done one-on-one care as a CNA. Maybe this is something you could consider, as the work would be at least a little less taxing physically. Hugs and prayers to you and best of luck with what you decide.

 

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An anonymous caregiver answered...

i know what u mean.. i work noc shift full time and i have almost a hole sation to my self and i have 24 - 28 residents it just depends on how many cna we have working that night..... i really think this is not right... cause not just taking care of each and everyone of them i also have to get 5 of them up every morning starting at 5am and i have to have them up by 6:30am when my shift is over... that is to much... i really hope there is a law agains this...

 

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An anonymous caregiver answered...

As I see it there is no answer to the question. My wife come home every night tired as hell, maney time crying because of the abuse that goes on at her job. I am 57 years old and I will not allow to placed in a nursing home where the CNA's are working there life away. Administrators seem not to care and the only thing they are looking for is the money. the revolving door attitude is alive and doing very well. I say CNA's enough is enough stand up for what is right. It is the right thing to do.

ENOUGH

 

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Unimpressed answered...

I work in Washington state at a long term care facility on NOC shift, and I regularly have 18-22 residents a night. When someone calls in (or does a no call, no show like last night) I have 30-33 people a night. I agree, it is simply too much to do, and i go home feeling like I did a substandard job.... I hate that feeling.

 

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An anonymous caregiver answered...

I am also a CNA in Georgia. I have been certified since 2002, and have had a full share of being overworked.... and underpaid!! There is no law in Georgia but maybe this is something we should try to get into law. Not only are we putting residents at risk, we are putting ourselves at risk. People pay for good, quality care to be given to their loved one. If you have 1 CNA with 20+ patients clearly that cant be done!! I once had an entire unit (36 residents) to myself... no help at all from the 2 nurses... out of those 36, 12 HAD to be up for breakfast the next morning-no exceptions!!! Thankfully I'm no longer at that facility.

 

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lady75 answered...

I work in a facility that is so poor. All they think of is the money. There are 3 aides at noc(which is my shift) One nite they put me with 30 residents and I have to get 7 up for morning shift. so that nite I could only get 5 but the day shift lied and said I got 2 up. I do rounds at 4am and getup at 5am. But i finished at 5:30am. The day shift also complained I left residents soaked and soiled. And the DON and Administrator told me I didn't do rounds all nite, of course the believe the day shift. OHH did i mention how nice that facility is in CO. It has its large wolfe spider, sliverfish on residents, and snakes. I'v seen and killed about 5 bugs that were on the residents. and I've only been there 1 yr.

 

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An anonymous caregiver answered...

I worked at a Nursing Home here in Anderson SC. I worked a total of 5 months.... I was making 7.75 an hour before I was Certified and didnt get a raise when I got Certified. On our nights when we were short we had 29 patients to take care of between 2 CNAs. They worked us like dogs, assisting patients to bathroom...changing them and showering atleast 2 every night... the facility has a hold on any raises and we didnt get any more money for more to take care of. We only had 1 charge nurse and she didnt help at all because she was too busy doing her job of 58 patients. My heart couldnt take it anymore... we never had time to sit and talk with any of them when they needed us, because we were so busy trying to get them all changed and taking care of their personal needs...we never had time to talk with them... it's so unfair to the residents and the CNAs. I am currently unemployed from this place.CNAs really do need to take a stand somewhere. Demand that all the residents have better mental and physical care.. and basicly pay the people who are and want to become CNAs.. it would work alot better than what it is now. More people would be willing to work and more willing to help.They are currently 22 CNAs short and more are quiting. They have pests problems too, roaches that are so big they could nearly tote you off, big spiders and even worse...we have seen snakes in residents rooms.Too bad that residents families dont see these things going on. I dont think they would be too happy.

 

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An anonymous caregiver answered...

I work in a hospital in the state of Ohio there are days when I have 40 patients. They say that there is mo set number because we have the rn & lpn who help us. What they don't take into consideration is that they don't help us at all. It's crazy that they think we can take care of all those people and they get the proper care. And then complain to us about patient satisfaction.

 

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An anonymous caregiver answered...

I work for a nursing home in Virginia. I have never seen a faciliitywere the Director of nursing and the administrator really doesn't care about the care of the resident. I work on the night shift and have had up to 40 residents in one night. I don't care who you are you can not give quality care to the residents with that many resident. I am getting to believe just like everything else when the state come into these nursing home, I think they are paid under the table or just refused to get involve in what is really taking place in these facility. Instead of coming at a certain time or in the window, I think they should pop up anytime unannounce. I know when they come into our building, our administrator or someone warn us over the intercom. If you're doing what you're supposed to do, why would you have to warn anyone. Also doing those days when the state is here, we get more staff added on to the schedule, other department help out with feeding, we get more help than we know what to do without. Even the DON help out which she rarely does. It's just a show. If the state not there, they don't care how we make out. Heaven forbid if you get sick and the take you out they will give some people a surrent and other they don't. To be frankly honest, if I know that nursing was going to be like this, I wouldn't gotten involve. Please offer me some suggestion Sincerely, Offer Hopes

 

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An anonymous caregiver answered...

Am so sorry for you all and for myself, I read all your comments and I cry because am going through the same thing too, I also got injured on the job and they have light duty beside my name and a doctors note, but they throw me on the floor any way doing the same thing, one day I was there by myself on the floor what a joke... there is so much I want to say, but it's no use saying it my MRI don't look good and they know and still working me like am nobody, I adore the residents, the family and the residents love me, am so happy when they told me thanks and hug me... am there for them, some of them understand when I take more than 15 min to answer the call light, they know when we are short staff because they have to wait for a while or listen to my promise that i'll be back in a few mins or they are next it's horrible... Am getting ready to go back to school because I don't know how much longer my back will last sometimes my legs go to sleep while am walking I want to save what I have left, I work everyday I call in 1 day and I didn't get pay for it even though I got hurt on the job. Been there 2 years call in 2 times 1 with the flu I caught there most of the staff caught it, and the second time is my back from from the injured I got there, am one of their best employee if not the best and reliable worker also...

 

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An anonymous caregiver answered...

I am a current cna in CA I work noc shift. I usually have 19 patients a night with 12-14 incontinent of b&b. 6 extreme fall risks. With 2 get ups sometimes more. All depends on if my coworkers decide to come to work..... dragging and bitching about how tired they are..... when my coworker (cna) calls in or is a no call no show I have had 36 patients for up to 3 hours alone. Needing to answer call lights/change/turn/take vitals/chart/emergency. There is NO time for error. Im am a very compassionate person I feel so bad for my patients. I do a damn great job when my coworker shows up. I cant seem to get away from all the stress :( please helpppp

 

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Humble9 answered...

We as nurses and CNA need to organize. The owners have money and own the government. It would take many people together to change this, one or few people will just get hurt. The only thing owners care for is money, unless it's nonprofit place. If I was more computer smart I would start a site where all the healthcare workers could communicate and organize to help our residence who worked all their lives and now are being exploited by the ones who pray on the weak, sick. (I don't see how else I could describe that.) For now I will do what I can and the best I can to help my patients. OUR PATIENTS DESERVE BETTER then 50:1, 20:1, or 15:1 THEY ARE PEOPLE LIKE YOU AND ME. I just wonder would the owners want to stay at a place where one person takes care of 15 patients when they get older?

 

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An anonymous caregiver answered...

I am a cna and worked 3rd shift. The residents do not get the care they deserve! I usually have 25 residents. By the time I get one round done, it's time to start the next round. We are overworked and underpaid. I also wish there was a law. I never want to be in a nursing home. We do the best we can but, it's not enough. So sad!

 

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An anonymous caregiver answered...

I am a nurse and my wife is an aide in another facility. My wife called me upset about a 20:1 ratio on an evening shift...I nearly called the state health board, but she had already spoke to the supervisor to provide an extra person from another unit. Her facility wanted her and and another aide to do 40 residents on an evening shift. In my case it is often at night to have 30:1. There are no specific state guidelines, but the facilities do provide the state with how many hours of assistance each resident is getting on an average. If staff is short, then it is impossible for the facility to truthfully say this many contact hours are being used for each resident and in my opinion this is where the un-safeness and the fraud is implemented, because the are getting reimbursed for hours not provided. If those contact hours for ADL,S to Medication to Therapy are not provided, state and private funds are being stolen.

 

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An anonymous caregiver answered...

I work at a combination physical rehab/nursing home. I've usually got anywhere from 26-34 patients every night, and I'm expected to get a full set of vitals on at least half of them, toilet everyone, do 4-5 showers, pass out all the dinner trays, feed everyone that can't feed themselves, collect empty dinner trays, and get everyone into bed at a decent time. Many of my patients weigh almost twice as much as I do (I weigh 140lbs) and I'm expected to transfer them on my own. Also, since housekeeping staff, cooks, and maintenance all leave at 7pm, I do all of their jobs on my hall as well. And the worst part? I don't even make enough money to live on my own. STNAs/CNAs are the most overworked and underpaid people in the country.

 

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An anonymous caregiver answered...

I work in a nursing home in Arizona. I work on a sub acute unit. My ratio is 19-22 to1. My supervisors think this is normal for noc. I've only been here for a month, and I've never worked like this before. I'm labeled the complainer because I refuse to let them think this us ok. I told them I understand your running a business and your goal is to make money, but I refuse to be treated this way. I quit after 4 days of work telling them that ratio affects the quality of care I give, and I'm not comfortable with that. They promised to get more aides on the floor. I've yet to see it so far. Oh and I have 6 get ups.

 

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Greensburg pa. answered...

I am cna in the state of pa. I absolutly loved my residents. In august of last year I was fired for complaining about the two other cna were out smoking and I was resposible for 42 residents.At the facility had a rule that only one cna could leave the floor at a time. On this day when I went to the DON she told me shut up and do your job or your fired. She didnt want to here anything about it she fired me and denide me unemployment I believe that it is time to pull together and stand for our rights and fair pay for the work we do.We are so important to the health field but get treated like garbage

 

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An anonymous caregiver answered...

I am a Director of nursing at a small SNH/Rehab. in NY State. Not counting nurses, Day Shift=8 CNAs and 2 Unit Assistants, Evenings = 6-8 CNAs and 2 Unit Assistants and nights = 3-4 CNAs. This gives most a ratio of 1 CNA/8 residents; nights 1 CNA/16 residents until 6am, when 2 day staff some in early to assist. Not all facilities are understaffed, although we are tighter at times, and not all DONs are evil!! Yours is the most important job in the facility.

 

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Over 30 yrs. Exp. answered...

I'm glad to hear there are facilities that look out for the care of the resident. I have been a CNA since 1982 and recieved my STNA in Ohio in 2006. I have worked in many aspects of the medicial field, throughout my years as a nursing assistant. Nursing home, hospital, ER, ICU, Rehab Unit, EMT, Vent Rehab, just to name a few. I have been trainned on the job for many skills that nursing assistants are not required to do, which classifies me as a Tech in some jobs.

I have taken care of more residents than any one caregiver should ever safely be responsible for, but with people calling off and management usually not scheduling enough CNA's to cover these situations when they happen, then that leaves the CNA's who are there to carry their work load, along with the other persons. All these residents have to be cared for, no matter how many people are working that day. In the state of Ohio, we have the state who comes into the nursing homes to do surveys, and unless it has changed recently the ratio of CNA's to residents is 1 to 13. But, unless management knows that State is due in for their yearly survey, this usually does not happen. The DON from NY, above, seems to be trying to make sure the residents of that facilitity, received the best of care. My hat is off to her for trying to make a difference, by scheduling more CNA's to cover when there is more work to be done, in the morning hours. The only question I have for her is how many residents does your facility house? If your ratio for CNA's and residents is 1 to 8, that is fanastic, having the extra time to talk to a resdient, give a hug or be able to do thoes extra little things that CNA's would love to do for their residents, but don't have the time due to working short. Thank you to all the management and DON's out there who are trying to make a difference in the care that can be delivered, without thinking strictly the money aspect, but the care of the residents.

 

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An anonymous caregiver answered...

Here is the big joke: Nursing homes can use their director of nursing and any number of non direct care licensed nurses as part of their staff. This helps keep them covered with the state. All the while the direct care nurses and CNAs suffer with low staffing/insane work loads.

 

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An anonymous caregiver answered...

According to my administrator and DON. There is NO law for patient to caregiver Ratio. So we can NEVER call our self short. I work in Kentucky in a 102 bed facility. I work hard I don't stand around I do my job. But No matter how hard I work it's never good enough. I work 7-3 and that's when all the family members are visiting. I have 20 some odd resident to care for and it takes time to get to all of them for changing, turning bathroom visits showering and feeding. I know that everyone's mom and dad is special and important. But I am only one person and I hate how the residents who's families visit get more care than the resident's who have no one. I will get to everyone eventually but everyone can not be first!! there is only so much time in between feeding's that I have to get everyone cared for! Everyone want's "Mr. Jones" took to the bathroom and changed or what ever he wants every time he calls which is every 10min because his daughter comes in and yells and threaten's to call STATE! but Poor "Miss Smith" who has no family and no visitors gets left sitting wet because your busy making sure "Mr.Jones" window blinds are open at exactly 1pm for the best sunning time and his tv to be on channel 13 for his show and is bed to be maid like he made it at home with the 3 pillows placed in there special spots on his bed and what ever else he decides is important that day. no one cares about "Miss smith" That is until some one "important" see's her sitting there and want's to know why she hasn't been done and your answer is I'm trying but we're short staffed and I'v been caring for "Mr. Jones". Then you get read the riot act about how your not short. that manage your time better and no excuses will be heard. Then please tell me what I'm doing wrong. Tell me what I need to do to get the 100s of things required for each resident in my short 8 hour shift done. Tell me your way and I will try it but don't bark at me all i'm doing wrong and only say no excuses and just get it done. That helps NO ONE least of all my residents!!!

 

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tncna answered...

where can we go to start a petition for a law to be passed for cna to patient ratio to be a lower number, and better pay.

 

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Evil Corporations answered...

It is not always the Director of Nurses or the Administrators fault that Nursing homes are understaffed. They get their orders from the board and/or corporation that owns the place. Most DON's want to have more cnas on and the corporate jerks will tell them no because too much money is coming out for cnas and they need to cut back. What these idiots do not realize, it takes money to make money. When you have proper staffing and equipment, you will have satisfied customers and you will always be full. :-) I have been a cna for 14 years. Only once have I seen a corporation actually care about their patients and workers. And they are one of the most successful medical corp in the country. Oh, and as to your question, most states have ratios but they allow these facilities to count a nurse or med aide as a caregiver. So, if there is a ratio of 12 patients to one caregiver and there are 20 patients and it is just you and a nurse, the state allows this. Which is ridiculous. Most nurses don't even like to answer lights in LTC. That's if they have the time to between meds, finger sticks and treatments. Basically, unless the states change their laws, the cnas and patients are screwed.

 

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An anonymous caregiver answered...

reading the comments make you shake your head because I work in a nursing home as well in VA and its hard taking care of 30 residents and 4 of them are either in a wheel chair or in a wheel chair and dead weight . to have no help should be against the law , why because if someone was to fall or something was to happen what do we say to the family besides you cant watch everyone at one time !! up and down the hallway from the time you come in to the time you leave . the boss doesn't care , she has no problem letting go people or cutting hours and that right there should be against the law too .. smh , I could go on and on about this nursing home . I just wish a change will come , better yet come and shut her shit down !!

 

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An anonymous caregiver answered...

I have been a CNA in IN and IL off and on for over 10 years. Over the years, I have worked all 3 shifts at one time or another, but am currently working NOC...and have been for the past several years. My current facility is BY FAR the worst I have ever worked at! There have been multiple times in the 1 year I have worked there that a call-in has caused there to be only one aide in the entire building attempting to care for between 45 to 60 residents! Twice, that one aide was me. One of the times, an Evening shift aide was allowed to stay over to help me until 2am-but not allowed to stay later-even though she was willing to do so-because if she stayed that would give her overtime. The other time, I was forced to work the entire 10pm to 6am shift as the only aide and i think our census was 52 at that time...and one of the halls is a locked Dementia unit that at the time had about 10 residents. No attempt was even made that night to find a replacement for the CNA who had called in...and the DON and the ADON _who are both supposed to be "on call" both refused to come in and work the floor. they would rather severely endanger their residents than inconvenience themselves or "lower themselves" to work as a CNA for one night. But far from this only being a problem every once in a while when someone calls in...it is actually standard practice to schedule only 2 Aides in the building on weekends and 3 on weeknights and right now our census is 71. The locked Dementia unit is "my" hall-I even applied separately to work that hall when it first opened. The dementia unit is currently at full capacity with 17 residents...and that is definitely a handful to care for alone...because let me tell you...Alzheimer's patients DO NOT all sleep at night-in fact this is often when behaviors escalate the most. But i signed up for it and i could handle it...IF the 17 residents on the locked unit were my only responsibility. BUT THEY AREN'T! I also am expected to care for the 13 residents on another hall outside of the locked unit!

 

Jullissa answered...

I used to work 3rd shift.. I had 6 people to get up.. I got them dressed in bed st 2am.. Because its impossible to start at 5am & have all ready. I had them up by 3am.. Poor residents.. But really this is what they want.. I now work 1st shift. I am constantly on my own since there's call offs ,, or new aides. I work at a regular pace...I won't rush .. Because if I show them. I can get run the hall by myself.. They will expect it. No ,, not happening.

 

STNA-in-OH answered...

I had the same question recently and came across this helpful site.

http://www.theconsumervoice.org/sites/default/files/advocate/action-center/Harrington-state-staffing-table-2010.pdf

 

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An anonymous caregiver answered...

I am a RN in Ohio. The facility that I work in has a 1-6 ratio STNA to resident. We expect exceptional care and staff accordingly. We are non-profit and rely heavily on donations to supplement our home, we truly put all of our revenue back into the care of our residents. Approximately 95% of our residents are medicaid.We cater to the poor with the with a mission to provide for the elderly poor. Everyone has a private room with a private bathroom, shower, microwave, and fridge. We have a long waiting list for admission, have had citation free dept of health state surveys the last two years and always score well above state average in both resident and family satisfaction surveys administered by the state. We love our residents and staff.There are good facilities out there ( I work in one ) you just have to find them.

 

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An anonymous caregiver answered...

I work in new york, i have 10 patients to care , i have 4 h to wash , dress,brush teeth, brush hair,... Some times i can not give an appropriate care to them the time is not enough. The new owner dont care . 7-3 knew to have 6 aids = 8 patient / now 5 aid = 10 patient I was happy with my work but i want cry now , is to much to much

 

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An anonymous caregiver answered...

I work in NC and i have between 21-31 residents every night. I work in a 200 bed facility we may have 4-5 aids on the floor at one time. There is no law here and they will kill you with the work load.

 

Crotchity answered...

If you see that conditions are unhealthy or unsafe, regardless of the ratio, it is important to write a letter and make a phone call to the state.

We had a relative in a nursing home for a sad, brief time. It was unsafe, unclean and under staffed. I wrote letters of concern and made phone calls, even though we were one of the fortunate few to get out alive.

The place was closed within a month.

I had no way of knowing if we were the only ones filing complaints.

Even if you are an aid, you can report abuse or neglect. It is our duty and responsibility as human beings to look out for those who are unable to look out for themselves.

Please care enough to speak out and say something.

God bless each and every one of you.

I am so sorry to you who are working under such sorrowful conditions caring for our loved ones.

 

past CNA answered...

I know how all you feel, I was a CNA working fulltime & PRN, I`d pull double shifts, & the main hall I worked on usually had 35-40 residents. & kept getting asked to watch other halls. thats just too many people for one person to take care of with out incident. think about 150 residents total with only 6-7 CNAs a shift to take care of them all. there were many times I worked double shifts without even getting 5 mins the whole to rest or eat. I think there needs to be a 15 patient to CNA ratio, that way they get the care they really need & deserve.

 

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An anonymous caregiver answered...

As a newly licensed RN, I can understand the concerns about one person having too many patients, whether working as an aide or a nurse. I recently quit a job at a facility after my first full day of the floor alone. This facility had one floor of sub-acute care, and one floor of long-term care in which I worked for this story. First shift alone was only a half a shift with 20 patients. First full shift, I had 20 patients for the first half, and then the entire floor of 40 patients by myself, with 3-4 CNA's. If it were not for the aides, I would have not made it through. Long story short, I had 2 major med passes, was behind all shift on both even with help at the end of each, and felt quite inadequate and overwhelmed. In the end, I knew this was the norm for that floor and I was not about to continue to risk the patients' lives or my licence for the experience. I hear stories from my nursing friends about their jobs, and I really wonder why there are not limits in place to ensure safety of patients and the employees. One day I hope I can make a change because it's not about it being too much work, but again, it's about safety and the reality of what one person can really do safely and properly in the allotted time frame.

 

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An anonymous caregiver answered...

My mother, who had hip surgery, has been in a CMS highly rated rehab/nursing center for two weeks. The CNAs and RNs that work with my mom are super nice. And unfortunately, they seem to also be understaffed. I may know the CNA response time more than some other residents' family because my sister and talk to her everyday and we alternate the days that we go up there. I stay for 5 hours every time wheeling her to the little courtyard and assisting her with whatever she needs.

She has to be on Lasix and has to use the restroom often. When she was first there, she couldn't get from the in the wheelchair to the bed by herself and I have no training in transferring a patient correctly. So she pushed the call button. 15 mins later, still no response. I decided to help her. I was nervous that she'd put too much weight on her leg or lose her balance but thankfully she didn't. When my siter or myself weren't there that first 5 days, she often times had to use her diaper because she had already waited 30 mins for someone to respond and couldn't hold it any longer. Thankfully she can now get into her wheelchair safely on her own. BUT she has a hard time getting it over the thresh hold of the door. We have spoken to the care manager 3 times saying that we think they are UNDERSTAFFED. Finally talked to a therapist who told me the right person to call. So I have now told her that the CNAs seem to be understaffed and can't respond to the patients in a reasonable amount of time!! I can see them with other patients when I'm there. No one is just sitting around. It looks like the director of nursing is going to add another CNA to the night shift but I told her I'd be glad to write and call the owners to get her permission to add more CNAs and RNs. I think she needs the families to take a stand for their loved ones to push the owners into releasing more funds for staffing. It's not high quality care for patients to have to soil their diaper, stay in soiled diaper for up to an hour, or get stuck in a doorway tryingto enter or leave their bathroom.

I don't want to just stand up for my mom, I want all elderly patients to get the best care possible. This for-profit company will not be allowed to provide minimum care so that they can prosper to the highest degree possible. I will keep paying attention to my mom's needs, and will check in with the other elderly residents and their families, to ensure that the elderly are not being neglected. And I will ask the CNAs if the facility is actually trying to add more staff so that they are not so overworked.

 

Fight for your right answered...

To all the strong, patient, compassionate, proud, loving, and caring CNA 's out there I would like to say, It's time for us to speak for the elderly keep our heads up and stop complaining it is time for us to stop hiding and stop pouting and stop crying for our residents and fight for them and their rights. We care we are the only people who understand them. They love each and everyone of us. We know they are being charged alot of money for excellent care. That we all know is a lie. We know they are being neglected come on, 28 to 40 resident to one Aid be real. We know better"excellent care". We just don't have the time because we are only one person to all 15,20,28, and 40 residents. I feel every one of your pain, because I have, and still work with those residents. I just cannot leave them behind. We most defiantly know that we are under staff no matter what shift we all work. But if you stand back for a minute and look at the bigger picture. They are asking for our help in helping them. They have all suffered enough. When are we going to stand up for our residents. The ones we see ,every day. The ones we can't get enough of. Hurting ourselves over I think it's time to stop crying we are going to all be there someday would you want to be treated like that. Its time to make laws on how many people per person to take care of our grandparent/residents. We are amazing people we get paid less then most people. We work really hard and love all our residents because their loved ones are too busy. So they come to nursing homes and pay the automate price in us to love support and care for there loved ones. So nursing assistants. You call yor self a NAC then fight for what's right fight for them so we can have more quality time with them get to know them better. Smile again instead of being over worked and busted.

 

Concern CNA answered...

I also work as a CNA Jacksonville, Fl.We are also understaff working with 1:20 residents it sad because the people we take care of have to be treated like this you don't have time to show compassion.IT's a in& out thing.I love talking with my residents&it's sad that We don't have the time.They always tell me sit down in talk for a min rest yourself.I just smile in say I would love to be I don't have time.It's sad that there is no time for a conversation.Sometimes We as CNA are the only people they have.I always look at it like the no one knows their density you just might end up&one of these beds.How would u want to be treated.IF ANYONE KNOW OF SOMEONE I CAN Write to CALL.I Would appreciate it.Someone has to do something.These companies just don't. Care about their staff or the quality care of Our residents.It's not just the Nursing home.I work it's going on all over Jacksonville.

 

100% helpful
Greatful Admin answered...

Having been in the long term care industry for almost 30 years as an owner and administrator, I agree with those that believe nurse aides and nurses. There are some excellent caring people that work in the long term care world and they are not in it for the money. Having said that, the recent problem we have is finding qualified aides that want to actually show up for work. We schedule for a 1:10 ratio yet we get so many call offs the staff works short a lot more than they should. This is a self inflicted problem by the aides. The most a DON or Administration can do is get enough people hired, trained and on the schedule. Then it's up the aides to show up for work. Yes there are legitimate reasons to call off, but a can of peaches falling on your head or it's too windy out are not legit. (and yes, those are real excuses I have had in my career). The other issue is that everyone has been cutting reimbursement for nursing home care. From the feds to the State (in Ohio here) to insurance companies, they all want more and to pay less. Yes there are some bad operators out there and I personally despise them as they give the rest of us a black eye. Yet it seems they rarely are ever closed down. For all of those that read this blog, I say thank you for caring and the great jobs you do, the residents need you more than you know. Keep up the good work and be proud of the work you do!

 

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An anonymous caregiver answered...

Might be time for a lateral career change. Some CNA's are finding switching over to EEG or EKG tech's a better way to stay in the health field but without a lot of the hassle and underappreciation that CNA's go through. If you are looking for a healthcare career change you might look into this EEG Technician Online Training Program, http://www.proprofs.com/training/course/?title=MjAxMTY3D

Hope this helps, hang in there you are worth it!

 

 
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