Our father is a victim of financial elder abuse.

1 answer | Last updated: Jul 19, 2010
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Caring.com User - Carolyn  L.  Rosenblatt
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Carolyn Rosenblatt, R.N. and Attorney is the author of author of The Boomer's Guide to Aging Parents. She has over 40 years of...
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This is a sad and distressing situation. I'm am sorry that your family and your father have been victimized by this abuser. I suggest that there may be civil, as See also:
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well as criminal remedies available to your family, depending on where you live. First, you might consider consulting an elder law attorney who deals with financial abuse issues and find out if you can get a restraining order against the abusive former caregiver. She is out to do anything she can to get your Dad's money, and the criminal court may move too slowly to stop her right now. Civil courts do have power to issue restraining orders but the laws vary from state to state, and what can be done depends on a number of factors. Next, I suggest that you find someone your father trusts, such as a friend, clergy member, doctor, his estate planning lawyer, or other to assist your family in starting a conversation with your Dad about the relationships with all of his kids. If you can begin to spend time at all in effort to re-establish trust among family, it's a start. You can seek the advice of a professional, such as a psychologist, social worker, or other mental health professional to guide you. Your father's behavior may be a part of changes in his judgment due to illness, dementia, or other conditions. If he can be persuaded to have a complete examination of his mental status, it could help. Medication might be needed to help if a treatable condition is diagnosed. In the meantime, stay in close touch with the district attorney who is prosecuting the case against the abuser and let him or her know that the abuse is ongoing. Perhaps the criminal court can take steps to stop her from having access to your father also, while you are awaiting her trial or next step in the criminal prosecution of the matter. A court order to prevent contact could also be issued by the criminal court judge. Next, I suggest that you find someone your father trusts, such as a friend, clergy member, doctor, his estate planning lawyer, or other to assist your family in starting a conversation with your Dad about the relationships with all of his kids. If you can begin to spend time at all in effort to re-establish trust among family, it's a start. You can seek the advice of a professional, such as a psychologist, social worker, or other mental health professional to guide you. Your father's behavior may be a part of changes in his judgment due to illness, dementia, or other conditions. If he can be persuaded to have a complete examination of his mental status, it could help. Medication might be needed to help if a treatable condition is diagnosed. In the meantime, stay in close touch with the district attorney who is prosecuting the case against the abuser and let him or her know that the abuse is ongoing. Perhaps the criminal court can take steps to stop her from having access to your father also, while you are awaiting her trial or next step in the criminal prosecution of the matter. A court order to prevent contact could also be issued by the criminal court judge.

 

 
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