Aging in Place Gadgets


family_couch

Ninety-five percent of people 75 and older say they want to stay in their homes indefinitely. This desire for independence is perfectly natural, but for their children, it's also a recipe for worry -- that they'll fall, forget to take their meds, or just need assistance. You can make your parents' home far safer and more comfortable by investing in some of the new devices aimed at elders who have made the choice to "age in place."

Solutions for safety worries

"Seniors can really get in trouble because they feel like they're losing their grip on independence," says Susan Ayers Walker of SmartSilvers Alliance. Ayers monitors technological advances aimed at helping seniors hold on to their independence as they age. These technologies also help the children of aging parents, who worry that Mom is going to fall down the stairs, leave the stove on, or forget to take her medication if no one is around to notice.

Here's a worry-by-worry guide to some innovations -- several tested and recommended by Walker -- that can make all the difference if you're concerned about your live-alone parents' safety or just their day-to-day ease of living.

  1. YOUR WORRY: My parents won't be able to reach me in an emergency.

    TECH SOLUTION: Big-button cell phone. According to the Pew Research Center, many seniors won't use a cell phone even in an emergency. They find them too complex, can't manage the tiny buttons, or can't read the screens. A big-button phone like the Jitterbug ($147), designed specifically for seniors, could give you and your parents peace of mind. It's an easy-open clamshell with extra-loud speakers, big backlit buttons, a bright screen with easy-to-read numbers, and a straightforward service contract (at an additional cost). The Jitterbug One-Touch takes simplicity a step further, with just three big, impossible-to-miss buttons -- one for 911; one for the operator, who will connect your parent to anyone she wants to reach; and one preprogrammed to connect your parents to you or another family member. Such phones cost $10 to $80 per month for the service plan in addition to the cost of the phone.

  2. YOUR WORRY: My parents can't clean the house.

    TECH SOLUTION: House-cleaning robots. This one isn't as Jetson as it sounds -- the iRobot family of automated cleaners ($120 to $500) is available at your local big-box store. Although you could hire someone to clean your parents' home, Walker points out that being able to vacuum on their own in between visits from the cleaner goes a long way toward restoring your parents' sense of dignity and control. If a box of cereal spills, they can let the tiny, effective iRobot Roomba handle it with the push of a button, rather than struggling with an upright vacuum. The Scooba, which washes floors on its own, can prevent your parents from slipping and falling while trying to keep them clean, and the Looj -- the rain-gutter cleaning robot – can, over time, save on the cost of having a handyman do the job.

  3. YOUR WORRY: My parents will zone out, let the shower get too hot, and get burned.

    TECH SOLUTION: Temperature-activated flow reducer. It's relatively low-tech and can cost less than $40, but this gadget sure does work (search for it online using the key words temperature-activated flow reducer). A screw-on faucet attachment prevents burns by shutting off the water from a sink or shower if it gets too hot.

  4. YOUR WORRY: My parents won't remember to take their medications -- or they'll take the wrong ones.

    TECH SOLUTION: Automatic pill reminders. By the time a person reaches age 70, says Walker, she's probably taking about 12 medications. The inability to take them unsupervised accounts for up to 40 percent of nursing home admissions. Fortunately, many devices available now can remind your parents to take their pills and keep them from getting their prescriptions scrambled. These range from pillboxes with alarms and timers to services that will send your parents medication reminders by phone, e-mail, or pager. MD.2, for example, is a monitored dispenser that you or a caregiver can load and refill, and your parents can dispense all their pills right on time, with one touch of a button. Rescue Alert will monitor your parents' pillbox electronically and alert a dispatcher if the lid isn't opened when it's supposed to be. Do an Internet search for medication reminder for a tour of the many options and find the one that's the best fit for your parents. Prices vary.

  5. YOUR WORRY: My parents will burn themselves cooking, or leave the stove on and start a fire.

    TECH SOLUTION: The Safe-T-element Cooking System. This device consists of cover plates you can install over existing stovetop burners that limit how hot they can get and automatically shut off the stove if they reach a certain temperature. Prices vary.

  6. YOUR WORRY: My parents will fall and won't be able to get up.

    TECH SOLUTION: Personal Emergency Response System (PERS). These home devices connect your parents to a 24-hour call center with a push of the button. The transmitter can be worn on a neck pendant or bracelet and sends a signal to the call center via a receiver connected to your parents' home phone line. Your parent can push the button after a fall or any kind of emergency and the call center will contact you or emergency personnel as appropriate.

    PERS can be purchased or leased, and prices vary widely. Expect to pay $200 to $1,500 if your parents want to own their system, plus a small monthly monitoring fee. Rentals, which usually include monitoring, average $15 to $50 a month. Lots of companies sell PERS; one way to find one in your area is to do an online search that includes your state or region.

  7. YOUR WORRY: My hard-of-hearing parents will miss phone calls or leave visitors standing outside the door.

    TECH SOLUTION: Doorbell-telephone flashing-light signaler. If your parents are getting hard of hearing, a device that enables a ringing doorbell or phone to trigger a flashing light -- including existing house lamps and special strobes for rooms where lamps aren't generally used -- lets them know when they have a call or visitors have arrived. Search for one online using terms such as doorbell and hard of hearing. Such gizmos usually cost $70 and up for doorbell only; $110 for doorbell and phone.

  8. YOUR WORRY: I can't be there all the time -- how will I know my parents are OK?

    TECH SOLUTION: Monitoring systems. A number of high-tech monitoring systems on the market now do what you can't: watch over your parents to make sure that nothing out of the ordinary is happening -- and report in to you, your computer, or a dispatcher when something does (for example, one of your parents goes into the bathroom and still hasn't come out an hour later). They usually cost about $200, plus a monthly monitoring fee of about $100. Obviously, to avoid having your parents see you as Big Brother, you'll need to discuss the idea and make sure they're OK with it before buying.

    Some, like the QuietCare Plus, work with any PERS your parents already have but add motion detection and also monitor whether the house gets too warm or too cold. All this information is sent to a website that you can check any time, but QuietCare representatives are also on the lookout for anything out-of-the ordinary.

    Another option is BeClose, which places discreet sensors throughout the home to track your loved one's daily routine, and sends you an e-mail any time there's a disruption.

    Similarly, the E-Neighbor System is programmed to detect unusual activity in the home. A shower left running or a fridge that goes unopened for a day could trigger a phone call to you or a caregiver. Such devices cost about $300 plus $20 per month for emergency call center service.

    The GrandCare Como adds a new twist: It reprograms your parents' television via the Internet to monitor their well-being and, unlike other systems, acts as a two-way street, creating a customized "channel" through which you can send photos of grandchildren and coordinate a calendar with caregivers. Prices vary.

Was this checklist helpful?

65 Comments So Far. Add Your Wisdom.

25 days ago

this is really a very good advice. My 78 year old parents live alone in Lisbon, while I have to be miles away (although my brother is nearby), I am trying to find a way that of one falls around the house and cannot lift himself, there is an alarm device that they can wear that will alert the other first (perhaps with the blinking of the house lights as they are both a bit deaf...but so far didn't find exactly what I need)


about 1 month ago

Just wanted to give my two cents on this already great list. FotoDialer is a wonderful gadget that is a tremendous boon. FotoDialer connects into an existing telephone and allows the user to call people/places/emergency numbers by pressing a large button next to the, 2"x3" photo of whomever they wish to call. There are 24 available numbers, but the first page is dedicated to emergency numbers. The numbers stay in memory even if the batteries die, the power goes out, or you connect it into a different phone (can go with you on trips). http://www.FotoDialer.com/ or http://www.harriscomm.com/fotodialer-telephone-companion.html or http://www.maxiaids.com/products/7174/FotoDialer-Telephone-Speed-Dialer.html


3 months ago

Nice post. I used to be checking continuously this weblog and I'm inspired! Extremely useful info specifically the ultimate section :) I maintain such information a lot. I used to be looking for this particular info for a very lengthy time. Thanks and best of luck.


3 months ago

Can you tell us more about this? I'd love to find out some additional information.


4 months ago

If youe unsure about exactly where you stand or exactly where youe going? A lot more browser mode press Alt-1 and also the Kindle will plot your present place online maps. Alt-2 will learn nearby gasoline stations, and Alt-3 will discover restaurants. You must use Alt-5 to generate your individual search.


5 months ago

I recently purchased a phone that came with one of those "I've fallen and I can't get up" gadgets. No monthly fee which was the selling point for me. I haven't hooked it up yet, but will eventually. They sell them at BJ's and Kmart for


6 months ago

Great checklist. I wish that we had had gadgets like this when my grandpa was getting his home healthcare. Still, he didn't really need them. It would have just been for our benefit. Thiago


7 months ago

i need a gadget for the front door to let me every time my mother opens the door. to walk out.


11 months ago

Anyone know of a portable device that could help my 82 yr old dad find his way back home when he goes out for his morning walk? He's still fairly functional but gets disoriented sometimes and cellphone based GPS would be too hard for him to operate. I need something that has a light up arrow that points in the direction of home or maybe a voice guidance that will tell him where to turn to get home. It also would have to be on a necklace or perhaps a watch. Any ideas??


11 months ago

Here's a website advertising a 2 handle cup that will help those with shaky hands prevent spills. It costs about $6.75 each. http://www.colonialmedical.com/2-handle-independence-mug-P-5494.html


11 months ago

is there anywhere I can get a 2 handled cup or mug for my trembling hands Glebe


11 months ago

Hi my mum & dad are still at home my mum is his Carer. Dad has fallen a couple of times when mum is just doing housework etc is there something he can wear in his wrist that he can press to get her attention. We hve tried walkie talkies etc but he needs something on him because the walkie talkies etc are always out if reach when he falls as he is a very sick man. Thanks


12 months ago

There is a one time cost medical alert pendant ("Freedom Alert" thru LogicMark) that hooks to your landline, dials up to four numbers, and then dials 911. Very simple and inexpensive. Jumping to mobility issues I invented an innovative bed mobility "system" called "Friendly Beds" to keep elderly/disabled safe, independent, and at home longer. Check it out.


12 months ago

Is there something on the market like a wireless electronic monitoring bracelet for the elderly. like something will let me know she has wondered outside the property line while I am at work. she has Alzheimer and she wonders off sometimes. I know this is for criminals, but I think this would work great with someone with this disease and give the family a little ease if it would alert them when their love one wonders outside the perimeter. is there something on the market like this? Any suggestions?


12 months ago

Hello all, I need help!! I am have an elderly grandmother that lives alone and loves to be independent. However last night she was "sick" and has trouble seeing. I have seen the life alert but I don't think we are at the stage we need the monthly monitoring just yet like the life alert. But she needs to be ale to get in contact wiih us when need be asap. I am looking for something where she can wear it like a watch like the "FILIP" watch for kids or a necklace or even a large button cordless phone so she can just pick up and hit one number and it calls us directly. All assistance doesn't necessarily need 911 and don't want to have them called if they are not needed...


about 1 year ago

We searched for a similar service and found www.IAMFINE.com. It is similar to the todayimok.com service - except that the IAMFINE system calls my mother and requires her to press 1 on her phone. If she fails to answer then the system sends an email and text to my brother in London and me in California. We like this as we live a long way from her and still have piece of mind knowing she is OK everyday


about 1 year ago

Looking for simplicity. Is there a system, maybe via a smart phone app, that works like this: It is programmed such that every day at a preset time (or times) I push the OK button. If I do not push the OK button within a pre-selected time limit, the "system" automatically calls one (or more) pre-programmed phone numbers (or sends a TXT or email message) simply stating, "Mom/Dad/Uncle did not respond at XX:XX PM; Check with him/her". The system operates on an EXCEPTION basis; as long as the subject pushes the OK button at the preset time, no communication takes place. Simple, non intrusive, reassuring! Simplicity should equate economy!


about 1 year ago

I have a system that I developed for my dad called Today I'm OK. It sends a daily email to my dad in the morning. If he does not push the button, it sends another email 6 hours later. If he still does not push the button, it sends me an email to check on him. I live 10,000 miles away from him. I can call him or his neighbor to see what's up. www.todayimok.com. It is a free service.


about 1 year ago

This Market Overview of Technology for Aging in Place was updated in July, 2013, and includes a number of smartphone and tablet apps for caregiving. http://www.ageinplacetech.com/files/aip/Market%20Overview%207-5-2013.pdf Laurie Orlov Industry Analyst, Aging in Place Technology Watch (http://www.ageinplacetech.com)


about 1 year ago

Thanks for including the GrandCare System in this list... GrandCare now offers so many additional features - - the feature listed above was our original 2005 model. We now offer an interactive touch-based solution that not only can monitor activities of daily living, but also vitals and biometric readings. It also enables a loved one to video chat, play games, check weather/news, receive messages, pictures, reminders, medication scheduling and more. ZERO computer experience needed for the loved one!! We still have folks checking us out thanks to this article - - many thanks caring.com to check a live demo, visit www.grandcare.com


Anonymous said about 1 year ago

to the person looking for a simple call bell with silent vibration. I just got the Help Dialer 700 from ATS. It is a non monitored dialer with pendant and wrist band emergency notifier buttons. Essentially you connect it to the phone line and program three numbers into it. It will dial those in order when your elderly parent presses the button, you can then open a two line of communication or just hang up and go check on them. I programmed my cell and keep it with me at night in case of emergency. It cost one time $75 and seems to work pretty good. Very basic but good emergency tool.


about 1 year ago

For the person wanting to communicate with their Mom in another room of the house at night. This pair of wireless intercoms works fine. http://www.chamberlain.com/ccv2/pages/productmodeldetail.aspx?modelId=7808


Anonymous said about 1 year ago

Can someone recommend a simple call bell with silent vibration option for night use for my elderly mum for night use. She often needs help at night as she has breathing difficulties and needs to call my bedroom upstairs while she sleeps in her downstairs bedroom. Where can I get a simple call bell ideally with a silent vibrating option so that no one else gets disturbed at night. Any links to suppliers or products will be welcome. Thanks on advance.


over 1 year ago

I'm currently working on developing a mobile remonte monitoring system for seniors that also connects family members and caregivers through an online portal. This would allow family members and caregivers to check -up on the elderly person whenever they want (they could see things such as how active the senior is, where they are, the last time they were moving). I'd love to talk to anyone who would be interested in using a product like this. I graduated from Mechatronics Engineering and have an elderly grandmother who is my inspiration for making this device. We will be launching a pilot program with a retirement home next month and I'd love to get some additional feedback form anyone in this community who has a few minutes to let me know their thoughts.


over 1 year ago

I need to see what my mother is doing when I'm working I here there is a way to do it from your tablet ?


Anonymous said over 1 year ago

I am 75 an keep a trac phone handy with friends numbers at hand. one could have a neck loop holder made.


over 1 year ago

If anyone has a loved elderly person living next door and needs to be monitored. What we do with our mom (we live next door) is a baby monitored. It works great...we can hear her move around, if she falls we can hear her call out , if is coughing too much we will hear that. This way we and she is comforted and doesnt feel all alone. A very inexpensive way to monitor a house or two away.


over 1 year ago

Great list of gadgets! But I have to ask....honestly, how much success are you all having getting your parent to use any of these? My father is 90, still lives in his home alone...and still drives. We've tried the home alert necklace and cell phone -- though he initially seemed interested in each of them, we eventually returned the necklace because he wouldn't wear it, and he wouldn't keep the cell phone charged or on him. He used to be the "king" of the gadgets, but only shows a passing interest in them now.


over 1 year ago

whoever needs a PERS, like Help, I've fallen and can't get up let me know on techno_rave81@yahoo.com


over 1 year ago

Great list of gadgets! Here's a couple more that are extremely useful including: "Talking" devices: "talking" devices are gadgets or tools that inform the user audibly. Medical alarm is a device that is simply a must-have for all seniors, especially for those who live alone. Here's an article with a list http://rescuealertofca.com/elements-of-an-easy-safe-modern-living


almost 2 years ago

Adaptive clothing is another product for the "age in place" trend, which should be added to this excellent list! www.easyundies.net


almost 2 years ago

I want want to monitor my parents who live next door for falls or emergencies without paying the monthly fees. Is there a product that I can buy that can be programmed to call my cell phone if a fall happens.


almost 2 years ago

The prices should be low.


almost 2 years ago

Does anyone need help with reaching high shelves?


almost 2 years ago

I am currently living with my 75 y/o mom after she had surgery. She wants to take care of herself, especially her bath. I worry she may need help in the bathroom. The wireless doorbell may work to mount in her bathroom so she could "buzz" me. Anyone else have recommendations? I have also considered a baby monitor.


almost 2 years ago

amplifiers for the phone are available thru the independent living centers for people with disabilities.also join a commision or support group that deals with seniors or people with disabilities are available as a helpful scource.


over 2 years ago

This is a great list. I found another product called PathLights Automatic Lighting System that automatically light the path on dark staircases and hallways. There are three parts to the system. When you approach the first unit, it lights up and sends a signal to the other units to light up as well. The three units stay on for about a minute and then automatically turn off. It's made going up and down stairs much easier and safer. The system is battery operated and very simple to install -- just sticks up with the provided double-stick tape on the back plate. I got mine from Improvements Catalog http://www.improvementscatalog.com/pathlights-wireless-led-stair-lights/226408?defattrib=&defattribvalue=&listIndex=0


over 2 years ago

Thank you for the great information! This is a great list, and it is amazing how much technology has advanced in the field of eldercare! New technologies have allowed seniors to age-in-place much longer, and much more often. <a href=http://rescuealertofca.com/medical-alert>Medical alert systems</a> provide automatic help at the push of a button, allowing families of seniors to know that if their loved one falls, they can push a button and get instant help. There are stationary systems as well as mobile systems that use gps to locate a senior who has fallen outside of their home, and there are so many different useful features and add-ons that can help to ease a senior into living independently.


over 2 years ago

does anyone know of an email based service which sends an email each day to an elderly person who lives alone (my aunt checks her email first thing every morning) and the person need only click reply and send in order for the service to know they're ok. If an email goes unanswered for 12 hours say, then an alert would be sent to whomever is designated to check up on the person. If the person goes away on vacation say, they need only provide the service those specific dates. If this kind of simple service doesn't exist, it should! I work away at sea and it is difficult for me to check on her every day. An automated email monitoring system like this would be unobtrusive for the person and provide a timely alert when an email goes unanswered. Feedback appreciated.


over 2 years ago

I was wondering if anyone has found a solution for the post by Denise53. Denise53 7 months ago Is there a gadget available to help remember to use a walker? My name is also Denise. I'm new to this board and I'm looking for a device that will beep if my mother gets more than about 4 feet from her walker. She needs something that will beep to remind her to keep her walker next to her at all times as she will walk off without it. She has had numerous falls recently. I'm hoping to find something to attach to her walker and something to attach to her shoe or ? Last night, she wasn't using her walker to walk and was very unstable so she was holding onto furniture as she was walking and she actually tripped on the wheel of her walker that she had left behind another chair. Luckily she didn't break anything but spent 6 hours in the ER getting checked out. I hope this makes sense.


over 2 years ago

Great list! An important aspect of an "aging-in-place" technology is that it empower older adults, caregivers, and families. Some technologies currently available encourage self-care and prevention that starts at home, which helps reduce readmissions to the hospital and avoidable ER visits. Additionally, in this age of constant connection, having real-time information about the care and condition of the person in the home is essential. Home health technology platforms should make the life of the caregiver easier and be able to accessed on the go from a device such as a tablet or phone. Best, Melody Wilding Program Coordinator eCaring


over 2 years ago

I think this information is so useful for old person. I appreciate you for sharing this content. <a href="http://www.skindermatology.com.au">Dermatologist Brisbane</a>


over 2 years ago

great new source of technical support .


over 2 years ago

I still live alone and I love it. Now if my daughter would like to come over and clean ... I love that! Haven't seen that happening yet. I think she's all talk. LOL


over 2 years ago

yes technical support works well provided you have a generator for back up power source.


Anonymous said over 2 years ago

all of it


almost 3 years ago

Is there a gadget available to help remember to use a walker?


about 3 years ago

i need to know more about products for safety. Like how to keep him from turning on the stove and having the gas come out (which he can't smell)


about 3 years ago

My husband is 63 and my biggest worry was not having him answer the phone when I called from work to check on him. He,s physically disabled and would forget to put the phone on his walker when he got up and moved around. Our problem was solved with a new type of cell phone. We live in Canada and when I went to Roger,s our cable and phone provider to exchange my old cell phone we were shown a pair of phones that have become a lifeline. They have the larger numbers and instant dial features as well as a button on the back that if pressed three times will contact me as well as one other number at the same time in an emergency. It comes with a cord that can be attached and he wears his around his neck so it,s never misplaced or forgotten. All the calls made between us regardless of how many or how long are free of charges. This has given me the freedom to work a few days a week or run errands etc. free from the constant worry of what,s going on at home. He has me hanging around his neck all day and I have him in the pocket of my jeans.


Anonymous said about 3 years ago

My mother-in-law's Dashaway walker has helped her stay independent and we don't worry about her falling nearly as much as we used to. It's not only changed her life, but it's taken a huge load off of my husband and I. We thought it was expensive when we first learned about it from her friend. But, it's probably paid for itself several times over at this point.


over 3 years ago

Although some products have been around for a while, they are always being improved and or new technology taking their place. Your very helpful article has been posted on my Aging-In-Place Home Solutions Facebook Page. Thanks for your many contributions.


over 3 years ago

all these electical item are fine. But most can be totally electric and use your telephone line without usen an outside the family to alert a problem. Hence, no monthly fees for us that can't afford extra charges. I know, I hce several no monthly fee alert mechinisms.


over 3 years ago

The Sandwich Generation issues of caring for elderly parents can be tough. I always love it when I can find new tools to help with that. I have to say, that grandcare como sounds intriguing. I'll have to check into it. Thanks for the info. :)


almost 4 years ago

I'll be 73 in February, live alone and can tell I'm not what I used to be. No big problems yet but want to be ready with information for my son when it's necessary. Thanks!


over 4 years ago

My uncle keeps on losing his cell phones, he forgets and leave the cellphone in the cab or at a shop or at a Restaurant, any gadget or device which would buzz, if he goes say 50 meters away from it.


over 5 years ago

Great Article! I wish I had seen it sooner. While covering the CES show in January, we were introduced to some of the latest, "state of the art" monitoring gadgets for seniors living at home away from their children. One of the most amazing concepts was a watch that vibrated when it was time to take medicine. The Senior then pushed a button on a special device which opened a drawer on a PDA looking device containing their pills. After taking the pills and closing the drawer, a message was sent to the senior's children and doctor confirming the pills had been taken and keeping a record. "Imagine the Future of Aging," a video made by CAST Center for Aging Technologies, shows this pill system and many more devices which amazed us showcased at CES, and which I am sure will amaze you. The link to the video on ElderGadget is http://eldergadget.com/in-home-monitoring/aging-in-place-gadgets-for-senior-independence/,or if you prefer, you can probably still find it on You Tube. It is well worth watching. Thank you for all the good work you do. All the best, ElderGadget.Com


over 6 years ago

Hi All, This is not exactly a gadget, but my Mom has thoroughly enjoyed the Side Plate for Deluxe Over Bed Table (http://www.enablemart.com/Catalog/Healthcare-Furniture/Side-Plate-for-Deluxe-Over-Bed-Table). She suffered a recent hip fracture, and has been in bed recuperating. She loves to read, and because of the medications she is taking - she is constantly thirsty. We keep water or juice with her all the time. She was spilling both, but when we found this table, whew...did it make a difference!!! This is a split table that allows one section to stay horizontal while the other can be tilted to several positions to make reading easier. Hey, anything that makes Mom's life easier now is a lifesaver! If you have a parent that is bed-ridden, or likes to read in bed - this could be the answer for you as well! Check it out!


over 6 years ago

These are all useful things for improving the care of our great seniors! Our company manufactures a 2-Way key finder that has been used by many seniors and caregivers as a memory aid for conditions such as Alzheimers. See http://www.FindOneFindAll.com DavidM


over 6 years ago

I have a neighbor that lives in a apartment in our 4 plex. He has no phone. I needed to find something that he could use to alert me incase he had problems. i contacted many companies explaining my problem. They had many answers that cost in the hundred of dollars. It hit me that a wireless doorbell would work. I bought one for $10.00. I mounted the receiver in my apartment and gave him the button to push if he needed me. It works great and gives us both piece of mind. He carries the button in his pocket. It has a range of about 150 feet. Even if you have someone living with you, this would be a good addition.


Anonymous said over 6 years ago

This websit is just what I needed. I highly recommend this site. I parents who are 88 and 89 and absolutely do not want to leave their home. Some of these things could help. Thanks to American profile, a newpaper magazine, with the website listed in one of their articles. Thanks again.


Anonymous said almost 7 years ago

In conjunction with these items, I've also come across another website, http://www.enablemart.com/Catalog/Assistive-Living, that provides some great resources as well. Thought readers might like to add a few more options to their list!


almost 7 years ago

Although at first I thought it sounded a little HAL-ish, I have to say, these are really brilliant. Folks have considered what the need is and met it.


Anonymous said almost 7 years ago

My 87-year-old grandmother lives with me and these will be great additions for the coming years.


Anonymous said about 7 years ago

These gadgets are amazing... they address so many concerns and issues with elderly living on their own, and would be extremely helpful if they fit your budget.


Anonymous said about 7 years ago

I never knew there was so many cool gadgets. This is a great list.


Default_avatar-hhd399496100
Stay Connected With Caring.com

Receive the latest news and tips in your inbox

Join our social communities: