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Veterans' Benefits and Household Help

9 Government Benefits You Might Be Missing Out On: Page 4

By , Caring.com senior editor
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8. Burial benefits for veterans

Who's eligible: Veterans approved for eligibility with the Veteran's Administration

What you get: A grave site and headstone and, for some, a burial allowance for funeral expenses

How it works: If you're a veteran, you're eligible to be buried in any of the 131 national cemeteries, or in the state cemetery in the state you're living in at the time of death. Your spouse and children are eligible for the same benefit. The choice to be buried in a particular cemetery depends on whether there are grave sites available, and grave sites can't be reserved prior to death. There's no cost to your family for the grave site or for a government headstone or marker, which the cemetery provides. However, this benefit doesn't include the cost of either a funeral or cremation, which must be made privately.

For vets who prefer to be buried in a private cemetery, the government will still provide a government headstone or marker and burial flag. In addition, the Veteran's Administration offers a funeral and burial allowance to some veterans. If a veteran dies of a service-related disability, the V.A. pays up to $2,000 for burial expenses, plus the cost of transportation to a V.A. national cemetery. If the death isn't service-related but the veteran died while receiving care at a V.A. hospital or one under contract to the V.A., or the veteran is on a veteran's pension, the V.A. will pay up to $700 for funeral and burial expenses and another $700 for the cost of a burial plot or interment space. To find out more about medical and death benefits for veterans, contact the Department of Veterans Affairs.

9. Help with household chores

Who's eligible: Those over 60 or disabled

What you get: Free or low-cost home and yard maintenance and moving help

How it works: If you're struggling to maintain your home, it may be possible to obtain help with all those household tasks that have become difficult or impossible to cope with. Under the auspices of the Older Americans Act, many Area Agencies on Aging offer help with household chores as part of the umbrella of services they offer to help people live independently in their homes. In Florida, for example, the Mid-Florida Area Agency on Aging covers a wide array of household chores including seasonal cleaning, yard work, and household repairs that don't require a specialized license. They'll sometimes even cover pest control if it's part of overall house maintenance. They'll also send someone out to help with lifting and moving furniture, appliances, and other heavy objects.

In some areas, the Area Agency on Aging charges a fee for these services, but it's typically much less than you'd normally pay. In Minnesota, for example, one agency charges $15 an hour for snow removal and yard work. Some programs are free but require participants to pay for the services upfront, then apply for grants for reimbursement. In many cases, the minimum age to qualify is 60. Get started by finding your local Area Agency on Aging.