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Severe (Late-Stage) Alzheimer's Disease

The Stages of Alzheimer's: What to Expect: Page 3

By , Caring.com contributing editor
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By this final Alzheimer's stage, it's common to be bedridden and completely dependent on others, as the person can no longer reason or manage the most basic self-care.

Memory: As memory problems worsen, they begin to affect recollections from even the distant past. He or she may no longer recognize even close family members, including a spouse or children. He or she may not even recognize his or her own self when looking at photos or in the mirror and may consistently forget to take medicine and do everyday tasks like tooth brushing.

Communication and social skills:
As language skills decline, many peole at this stage speak nonsensically. They may make strange sounds, hum, or moan. Or they might cease to speak altogether. It's likely by now that the person you're caring for is quite socially withdrawn and has abandoned many previously enjoyed and familiar activities.

Everyday life:
Even relatively simple, necessary activities, such as eating and taking care of personal hygiene, require assistance. Both gross motor skills (walking and sitting up) and fine motor skills (buttoning a shirt, holding a spoon) are affected. Falls and injuries are a risk as coordination and depth perception decline. Repetitive movements and actions are common. Someone at this stage spends a lot of time sleeping.

Personality:
Because the changes have become so marked, he or she may seem nothing like his or her old self. Sometimes jolly people turn crotchety, while formerly stern people may become docile and benign. By the last stages of Alzheimer's, many people express no emotions at all.

Other: Monitoring health, nutrition, and safety and general caretaking is now a round-the-clock task. He or she may lose significant weight (because eating is difficult) and acquire infections or fall ill easily (because of general weakness). People weakened by this final Alzheimer's stage more often die from another health problem (pneumonia, secondary infection, cancer) than they do from Alzheimer's itself.