(800) 973-1540

Breast cancer warning sign #5: A change in nipple appearance or sensitivity

7 Early Warning Signs of Breast Cancer: Page 5

By , Caring.com senior editor
99% helpful
Change-in-nipple-appearance-and-sensitivity

One of the most common locations for a breast tumor is just beneath the nipple, which can cause changes in the appearance and feel of the nipple itself. In particular, nipple changes are often the giveaway for men with breast cancer.

How it feels: You may notice that one of your nipples sticks up less than it used to, or it might have become inverted, flattened, or indented. Women with breast cancer often recall that they noticed a decrease in nipple sensitivity, which is most likely to come to your attention -- or your partner's attention -- during sex. Another nipple change to take seriously is discharge when you're not breastfeeding, whether it's bloody, milky, or watery. The skin of the nipple may become crusty, scaly, or inflamed.

What causes it: Many breast cancers start in the milk ducts just under and around the nipple, affecting the nipple's appearance or causing pain or discharge. There's also a rare cancer, Paget's disease of the breast, that specifically strikes the nipple. A tumor in the milk ducts, just behind or to one side of the nipple, pushes the skin up around the nipple or pushes the nipple aside. As tumors grow, they may attach to -- and thus retract -- the skin or the nipple itself. The tumor might also cause irritation and infection, leading to discharge.

Scary stat: The American Society of Breast Surgeons recently released research that male breast cancer is typically identified later and is deadlier than breast cancer in women.

What to do: Because some women have naturally inverted nipples or have discharge during and post-pregnancy, a doctor won't necessarily notice this symptom. Since you're the one who knows best what your nipples look like, pay close attention to any changes and discuss them with your doctor. Mastitis is a common conclusion for doctors presented with nipple changes, in which case you'll be sent home with antibiotics. If they haven't cleared up the symptoms within ten days, go back and request scans.