Be alert to warning signs of depression after a stroke

Stroke and Depression: Page 2

By , Caring.com senior editor
96% helpful

It's not always easy to recognize depression. In the case of someone who's had a stroke, the situation can be even more complicated. If a patient has trouble talking or understanding language, it might be especially difficult to recognize depression. Increased emotional liability -- sudden and extreme mood swings, common after a stroke -- may also hide symptoms of depression.

You may also think he has good reason to feel depressed. After all, he's just had a stroke and can't do the things he used to be able to do. But there's a difference between the normal grieving process and depression. The warning signs of depression include:

  • Frequent crying episodes
  • Feelings of hopelessness or worthlessness
  • Poor appetite or increased appetite
  • Sleeping too much or not enough
  • Increased agitation and restlessness
  • Loss of interest in life
  • Expressing thoughts of dying or suicide

A stroke survivor should be evaluated for depression if he has had several of these symptoms for more than two weeks.